Yeshiva University News » 2003 » December

From left to right: Dean Karen Bacon, Dr. Zafrira Lidovsky Cohen, Rabbi Alter Metzger, Dr. Jeffrey Freedman, Dr. David Shatz, Dr. Jay Ladin, and Dr. Morton Lowengrub, vice president for academic affairs.

Dec 22, 2003 — To honor faculty members who published works this year, Karen Bacon, PhD, the Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern College for Women, hosted the annual book party on Dec. 18 at the Jerome and Geraldine Schottenstein Residence Hall on the Beren campus.

Each year the dean recognizes faculty members who contribute to their fields by publishing books and articles.

Faculty honorees and their books were:

• Dr. Zafrira Lidovsky Cohen, associate professor of Hebrew, for Loosen the Fetters of Thy Tongue Woman: The Poetry and Poetics of Yona Wallach

• Dr. Jeffrey Freedman, associate professor of history, for A Poisoned Chalice

• Dr. Jay Ladin, assistant professor of English, for Alternatives to History

• Rabbi Alter Metzger, professor of Jewish studies for Chasidic Perspectives: Discourses on the Jewish Holidays by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson and The Heroic Struggle: The Arrest and Liberation of Rabbi Yosef Y. Schneersohn of Lubavitch in Soviet Russia

• Dr. David Shatz, professor of philosophy, for Philosophy and Faith: A Philosophy of Religion Reader and Questions About God: Today’s Philosophers Question the Divine.

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Dec 19, 2003 — Yeshiva University exceeded its $400 million capital campaign goal two years ahead of schedule. News of the campaign reaching $405 million came in a speech by YU board chair Ronald P. Stanton at the university’s 79th Hanukkah Dinner and Convocation.

Mr. Stanton told 700 guests, including YU leaders and prominent philanthropists, at Manhattan’s Waldorf=Astoria, that the figure was significant as it underscored the depth and commitment of support for academic excellence for current and future students.

Campaign gifts, he said, included 90 gifts of more than $1 million, 610 gifts of between $25,000 and $1 million, and more than 22,000 gifts of less than $25,000. The funds support an array of academic and student life projects.

Hundreds of other projects have been supported by this effort. They include:

• The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program at Yeshiva College
• The S. Daniel Abraham Honors Program at Stern College
• 143 new endowed scholarship and fellowship funds – the Madoff Scholars
• The Beker Program for Psychological Services in Schools
• The Wilf Scholars
• The Michael F. Price Center for Genetic and Translational Medicine
• The Harold and Muriel Block Research Pavilion
• The Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center
• Cardozo School of Law Lobby and Renovation Project
• The Diener-Weissberg Reception Room at the 36th Street Residence
• The Wexner Kollel Elyon and Semikhah Honors Program
• The Norman F. Levy Lobby at 215 Lexington Avenue
• The Wilf Campus
• 26 chairs and deanships, including but not limited to, the Gottesman chairs, the E. Billi Ivry chair, the Kukin chair, the Merkin Family chair, the Katz deanship, among others.

“We are grateful to all those who contributed to our campaign to provide the best possible education to our students.”

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Article Photo From left to right: Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb, OU national executive vice president, Harvey Blitz, OU national president, and President Richard M. Joel.

Dec 17, 2003 — President Richard M. Joel kicked off the 13th annual Orthodox Union Torah Convention in Los Angeles on Thursday, Dec. 11, when he delivered the keynote address, “The State of the Jewish People,” at a dinner held at Congregation Shaarei Tefila.

During the five-day conference, “The Secret to Jewish Survival: The Jewish Family,” President Joel also delivered the drasha (sermon) on Shabbat morning at Congregation Beth Jacob in Beverly Hills, the largest Modern Orthodox shul in Los Angeles.

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Dec 16, 2003 — By law in a majority of states, teachers and administrators must report suspected cases of child abuse involving students. But how does an educator become trained to recognize abuse? And how can a school create an environment in which a child feels safe enough to come forward when abused?

These and other issues related to child abuse are components of policies regarding the conduct of educators and “mandated reporting” promulgated by the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools and Yeshiva High Schools (AMODS). AMODS was established in 1999 under the auspices of the Max Stern Division of Communal Services of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary to coordinate and deploy the educational strengths and resources of YU to improve the quality of member school’s educational offerings.

The policies were presented for approval at AMODS’ fifth annual conference, Dec. 7-8 at the New York Airport Hilton, attended by principals and lay leaders representing 40 schools from as far away as Canada, Washington, and Texas.

“Although we are hopeful that such abuse happens less in our community, we realize it does occur,” said Jeremiah Unterman, PhD, AMODS director. “We must be on the lookout to protect our children, whether it is physical or psychological abuse or neglect,” he said.

At the conference, a panel of three experts—clinical psychiatrist Atara J. Berliner, PhD, a psychologist at the Ramaz Middle School; David Pelcovitz, PhD, director of psychology at North Shore University Hospital-NYU School of Medicine; and Rabbi Yosef Blau, YU mashgiach ruhani [spiritual guidance counselor]—discussed the need for adopting AMODS’ policies, the first dealing with the behavior of faculty and staff towards students; the second delineating the education a school must provide its employees to be informed mandated reporters.

After the discussion, attendees endorsed a resolution that obligates them to recommend to their respective school boards that these policies be accepted.

“These guidelines perform an important service to protect our children, our parents, and our teachers and we applaud AMODS for bringing attention to this issue on a national level,” said Harry Kozlovsky, Yeshivat Rambam of Baltimore president, a conference attendee. “At Yeshivat Rambam we are planning a series of workshops to address this issue.”

The session on policies was one of 12 during the two-day gathering, titled “Funding and Marketing of the Schools.” Other sessions covered innovative curriculum development projects in Humash, Israel studies/religious Zionism for elementary schools, and a presentation on AMODS’ pilot project, Angel, a Web-based classroom management system that links students, teachers and schools in the Association network. It is currently in use at YU’s Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy.

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Dec 16, 2003 — Yeshiva University President Richard M. Joel delivered an address at the Edmond Benjamin de Rothschild Herzliya Conference in Herzliya, Israel, on Thursday, Dec. 18.

The fourth annual conference, “The Balance of Israel’s National Security: Setting National Priorities,” was sponsored by The Institute for Policy and Strategy, the Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy, and the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya.

President Joel spoke on “Building Future Jewish Leadership.” Other issues he addressed were The Jewish World Agenda and Future Challenges for Jewish Leadership; and Training and Nurturing Leadership for Diaspora Communities and Campuses.

The conference featured presentations by prominent policy makers and strategists from all over the world, including Benjamin Netanyahu, former prime minister of Israel and current finance minister; Silvan Shalom, Israel’s deputy prime minister and minister of foreign affairs; Lt. Gen. Moshe Ya’alon, chief of general staff, Israel Defense Forces; Dr. Yuval Steinitz, chair of Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee; Avishay Braverman, president of Ben-Gurion University, Ronald Heifetz of Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government; and Alan Dershowitz of Harvard Law School.

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Dec 16, 2003 — By law in a majority of states, teachers and administrators must report suspected cases of child abuse involving students. But how does an educator become trained to recognize abuse? And how can a school create an environment in which a child feels safe enough to come forward when abused?

These and other issues related to child abuse are components of policies regarding the conduct of educators and “mandated reporting” promulgated by the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools and Yeshiva High Schools (AMODS). AMODS was established in 1999 under the auspices of the Max Stern Division of Communal Services of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary to coordinate and deploy the educational strengths and resources of YU to improve the quality of member school’s educational offerings.

The policies were presented for approval at AMODS’ fifth annual conference, Dec. 7-8 at the New York Airport Hilton, attended by principals and lay leaders representing 40 schools from as far away as Canada, Washington, and Texas.

“Although we are hopeful that such abuse happens less in our community, we realize it does occur,” said Jeremiah Unterman, PhD, AMODS director. “We must be on the lookout to protect our children, whether it is physical or psychological abuse or neglect,” he said.

At the conference, a panel of three experts—clinical psychiatrist Atara J. Berliner, PhD, a psychologist at the Ramaz Middle School; David Pelcovitz, PhD, director of psychology at North Shore University Hospital-NYU School of Medicine; and Rabbi Yosef Blau, YU mashgiach ruhani [spiritual guidance counselor]—discussed the need for adopting AMODS’ policies, the first dealing with the behavior of faculty and staff towards students; the second delineating the education a school must provide its employees to be informed mandated reporters.

After the discussion, attendees endorsed a resolution that obligates them to recommend to their respective school boards that these policies be accepted.

“These guidelines perform an important service to protect our children, our parents, and our teachers and we applaud AMODS for bringing attention to this issue on a national level,” said Harry Kozlovsky, Yeshivat Rambam of Baltimore president, a conference attendee. “At Yeshivat Rambam we are planning a series of workshops to address this issue.”

The session on policies was one of 12 during the two-day gathering, titled “Funding and Marketing of the Schools.” Other sessions covered innovative curriculum development projects in Humash, Israel studies/religious Zionism for elementary schools, and a presentation on AMODS’ pilot project, Angel, a Web-based classroom management system that links students, teachers and schools in the Association network. It is currently in use at YU’s Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy.

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New York, NY, Dec 15, 2003 — Midtown Campus, the locale of Yeshiva University’s undergraduate programs for women, was last night named by Robert M. Beren, in honor of his distinguished, late uncle, Israel Henry Beren. Robert M. Beren is a longtime supporter of Yeshiva University and Chairman Emeritus of YU’s Board of Trustees. The late Israel Henry Beren of Marietta, Ohio, exemplified the ideals of Torah Umadda through his love of learning, commitment to excellence, and his philanthropic endeavors.

Since 1954, the Midtown campus has been the home of Stern College for Women, and since 1987 for the Sy Syms School for Business women’s division, and other YU programs. The campus, which began humbly as a single building for Stern’s pioneering program of women’s higher education, is now a $56 million complex of eight buildings stretching from 29th St to 36th St., across Park, Lexington, and Third Avenues, and the leading center for women’s Jewish education in North America.

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Marjorie Diener Blenden, chairman of Stern College for Women (left), and President Richard M. Joel applaud Dr. Bacon upon being awarded the first Presidential Medallion at the 79th Hanukkah Dinner and Convocation.

Dec 15, 2003 — More than 700 Yeshiva University leaders gathered Sunday evening (Dec. 14) at Manhattan’s Waldorf=Astoria for YU’s 79th Hanukkah Dinner and Convocation. The combined events recognized prominent philanthropists, recorded the success of YU’s $400 million capital campaign, and unveiled several major gifts.

Highlighting the Convocation was President Richard M. Joel’s presentation to Karen Bacon, Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern College for Women, of the University’s first Presidential Medallion for her dedication to Stern.

President Joel also conferred honorary doctorates upon: Ruth L. Gottesman, professor emerita of pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine; J. Ezra Merkin, managing partner of Gabriel Capital Group and chairman of YU’s investment and Israel committees; Marcia Robbins-Wilf, a noted reading expert and founding member of Stern College board of directors; and Josh S. Weston, the former chairman and chief executive officer of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. and a chairman emeritus of the board of directors of Sy Syms School of Business.

Ronald P. Stanton, chairman of the university’s board of trustees, used the occasion to thank benefactors in helping YU reach $405 million in capital campaign gifts, surpassing its $400 million goal two years ahead of schedule. He cited a number of academic and student life projects made possible by these gifts.

In his remarks, President Joel recognized Muriel Block for her $15 million gift to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine—among the largest ever received by YU—towards construction of the Harold and Muriel Block Research Pavilion, on the Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus in the Bronx.

Another proud moment came with President Joel’s announcement that YU’s Midtown Campus will be named the Israel Henry Beren Campus in memory of Robert M. Beren’s late uncle. Robert Beren, chairman emeritus of the YU board of trustees, is among the leading contributors to the campaign.

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Dec 11, 2003 — Bruce Adolphe, a composer and principal lecturer of the Chamber Music Society at Lincoln Center, spoke to a group of students at Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy-Yeshiva University High School for Boys on Wednesday, Dec. 10. The talk, part of a lecture series “How Does a Jewish Artist Function in a Secular Society?” was sponsored by ARISTA, the high school honor society. Adolphe is also a lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and has written music for Israeli violinist Itzhak Perlman.

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Shayna Greenwald

Dec 11, 2003 — Yeshiva University (YU) senior Shayna Greenwald was named Most Valuable Player of the Betty Shabazz Memorial Women’s Basketball Tournament, held Dec. 7 and 8 at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, NY.

The Toronto native and management major at YU’s Sy Syms School of Business averaged more than 20 points per game during the tournament. As point guard, Ms. Greenwald dominated the final game against Medgar Evers, which led by one point with three seconds remaining. Her three-pointer clinched the game for the Lady Macs, winning the championship 57-55.

“It’s an honor that a YU student was named MVP of the tournament,” Ms. Greenwald said. “We played really well as a team and everyone is doing a great job.”

Ms. Greenwald tallied 24 points, three assists, and one steal during the championship game, earning her MVP honors.

“In two very competitive games, Shayna’s tenacious defense and clutch shooting led the team to victory,” said Head Coach Karen Green.

The Lady Macs are now 6-0, the best start in their team history.

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