Yeshiva University News » 2007 » February » 08

Feb 8, 2007 — Yeshiva University (YU) will present a Community Day of Learning on the topic of “Jewish Medical Ethics and Contemporary Case Studies: The Role of The Doctor, The Role of The Rabbi,” hosted by the Congregation Beth Hakneses Hachodosh, on Sunday, February 18, from 9:30 am to 12:00 pm, at 19 Saint Regis Drive N, in Rochester, NY.

The talk, which is free and open to the public, will feature Rabbi Dr. Edward Reichman, associate professor of emergency medicine and of philosophy and history of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and attending physician at the Department of Emergency Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center. There will also be a panel discussion which will include Rabbi Dr. Edward Reichman, Rabbi Mordechai Hochheimer, and Rabbi Shaya Kilimnick. Free babysitting is available during the entire conference. To RSVP or for more information call 585-244-2740. More information is available at www.congbhh.org.

Community Day of Learning is a program of the Legacy Heritage Fund Rabbinic Enrichment Initiative at Yeshiva University.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Feb 8, 2007 — Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) has developed what is believed to be the first formal program at any rabbinical school in America designed to give rabbis’ wives the opportunity to meet with professionals to discuss issues of self, family, and community in a safe and supportive environment. The second Annual “Rebbetzins’ Yarchei Kallah” program will take place from February 12-14 at Congregation Keter Torah in Teaneck, NJ.

The conference is for wives of rabbis who are participants in the Yarchei Kallah Program which is part of the Legacy Heritage Fund Rabbinic Enrichment Initiative.

Rabbis’ wives face an increasingly complex series of opportunities and challenges in the 21st century. Many seek their own identities while striving to assist their husbands and fill the traditional role of a rabbi’s wife. Until recently, there wasn’t a “road map” that addresses their evolving role and provides them with guidance on how to navigate family and professional responsibilities.

“Rabbis’ wives play a pivotally important role, indeed many roles, in their communities,” said Rabbi Jacob J. Schacter, the internationally prominent rabbi who serves as Senior Scholar of the CJF and is directing this initiative. “Contemporary Orthodox Jews, from rabbis and rabbis’ wives to lay leaders and community members, are sophisticated, intelligent and rooted professionally and culturally in the secular world while living traditional Jewish lives,” said Rabbi Schacter. “We must ensure that they have the tools and guidance necessary to lead these lives creatively and intellectually, now and in the future.”

Over 40 rabbis’ wives, from 32 cities throughout the US and Canada will attend this conference where they will partiicipate in sessions such as “The Blessing and Fulfillment of Being a Rebbetzin,” “Physical and Mental Abuse in Families,” “Raising Healthy Children.” In addition, they will have mentoring sessions in which more experienced rebbetzins will provide insights and respond to questions raised in the sessions.

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Feb 8, 2007 — A group of 14 undergraduate students from Yeshiva University (YU), under the direction of university’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), traveled to Rabinal, Guatemala, during semester break on a humanitarian aid mission to volunteer in a developing community. The trip was organized in cooperation with American Jewish World Service (AJWS), who also sent two staff members to join the trip.

The YU students helped Fundación Nueva Esperanza (New Hope Foundation) at a school in Tacux, a small village approximately 20 minutes away from Rabinal. The school has flooding problems during the rainy season, and the YU group helped community members and students from the school dig a trench to provide drainage.
When the students were not using hammers, nails, and other construction equipment, they studied Talmudic texts related to social justice ¬¬¬¬– all while living in a village that follows Maya-Achi culture and norms.

The group also confronted challenges because of their religious observance. They brought new pots and pans to prepare corn meal daily. No kosher meat, dairy, or fish was available, so they ate corn meal, rice, beans, and vegetables — plus any kosher snacks they brought with them. There weren’t any showers, running water or electricity — quite an eye-opening experience for young people who generally come from middle-class backgrounds.

Because of the Jewish legal prohibition against carrying on the Sabbath unless within the confines of an eruv (boundaries defined by Jewish law), the students had to symbolically buy property for the eruv from village leaders for two boxes of matzah.

The purpose of the trip was to expose YU students to less privileged communities and individuals, and to encourage them to think about ways to help the world community. All of the students committed to follow-up social-action programs upon their return.

“I wanted to go on the trip because I believe that Jews have a responsibility to perform tikun olam (acts contributing to bettering humanity) when the opportunity presents itself, and this was certainly an excellent opportunity for helping out.” said Teaneck resident Michal Levine, a student at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women. Last year the university sponsored a similar trip to Honduras in conjunction with CJF, AJWS, and YU’s Office of University Life.

A list of the students who participated, their hometowns, and their emails is below. Photos are attached and identifications follow.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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