Yeshiva University News » 2007 » March

Mar 29, 2007 — And the award goes to ChaZack, created by Richard Lewis, Josh Graber, and Mathew Cherney. The winners of the Student Short Film competition were announced today by Yeshiva Universitys Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), which sponsored the festival, in which the winning producers, all Sy Syms seniors, received $2,000 toward the purchase of film equipment or Jewish books.

The festival’s theme this year was “Who is Your Jewish Hero?” Over 2,500 people saw the films and cast votes for their favorite.

ChaZack is the story of Zack Pollack, who suffers from cerebral palsy. He has overcome his disabilities and serves as a role model and inspiration to all of those around him. To view the film click here.

“All of the hard work and effort finally paid off. I’m thrilled,” said Josh Graber. “The more people who get to experience Zack Pollack, even if it’s on a screen, the better off this world will be.”

Using the new communications lab in Belfer Hall, some 30 undergraduate students created short films on the Jewish hero of their choice. A panel of three judges chose the top eight films—all five minutes long, or less—and the audience at the Schottenstein Cultural Center screening on March 21 narrowed the field to five.

“By encouraging students to use the tools of modern media and draw on their personal creativity, we want to encourage their individual voices in building the Jewish future,” said Jordana Schoor, CJF’s director of special projects.

The other contenders for the top prize were: Embracing the Dichotomy, produced by Chai Hecht and Shealtiel Weinberg; The Patriarch, produced by Ariel Saidian; Lchol Ish Yesh Shem: Every Person Has a Name, produced by Uri Westrich; and A Man of Ideals: The Story of Richard M. Joel, produced by Jonah Raskas.

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President Richard M. Joel with Sylvia Herskowitz, director of the YU Museum (left), and Jo Anne Anguilo (right), a systems analyst in Management Information Systems, who both celebrated 30 years of service.

Mar 26, 2007 — With more than 1,431 years of service behind them, the 78 members of staff and faculty at Yeshiva University’s Service Recognition Luncheon on Wednesday, March 4, had much to celebrate. The event honored employees marking their 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, and 40th anniversaries at YU.

“The ultimate lesson of education—to build community—is in the hands of the people in this room,” said President Richard M. Joel. “This is a community that stands as a model for how our students should treat the world.”

For photos from the event, click here.

Forty years ago, when Ethel Orlian and Rabbi Robert Hirt started working at YU, gas cost just 32 cents a gallon and the top show on TV was Bonanza. In 1966, Mrs. Orlian, now associate dean of Stern College, had just graduated from Stern and began teaching chemistry in the lab there and Rabbi Hirt, senior advisor to the president, began his fruitful career at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, rising from administrator to various leadership positions, including dean of the Max Stern Division of Communal Services.

By 1976, when Jo Anne Anguilo and Sylvia Herskowitz joined the University, gas cost 59 cents a gallon and movie audiences flocked to see Rocky. Ms. Anguilo, now a systems analyst in Management Information Systems on the Wilf Campus, began working as an assistant in the registrar’s office at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Ms. Herskowitz worked as director of the recently opened YU Museum, a job that she said launched her third career and changed her life.

Members of the “classes” of 1966, 1976, 1981, 1986, and 1991 received service certificates and special recognition was given to three of YU’s longest-serving employees: Reuben Heisler, production database manager, who began YU’s production department as a student and returned to work there 51 years ago; Jacob Blazer, supporting services administrator with 53 years of service—35 as facilities manager; and Joseph Ellenberg, who was awarded the Presidential Medallion at commencement last year for his 62 years of service as director of budgets and costs.

The following staff and faculty members were honored:

40 Years of Service
Rabbi Robert Hirt Ethel Orlian

30 Years of Service
Jo Anne Angiulo Sylvia Herskowitz

25 Years of Service
Judith Bacher
Edith Fein
Hilda Garcia
Florence Littwin
Filiberto Lopez Jr.
Luis Quintanilla
Julio Rodriguez
Avis Thompson
Franco Vitiello
Galina Vovchuk

20 Years of Service
Shulamith Berger
Zelda Braun
George Bruno
Zahava Cohen
Herman Colon
Albert Ephraim
Norma Feld
Raphael Fernandez
Terry Gair
Adam Gleicher
Norman Goldberg
Dale Hochstein
Gloria Marin
Raphael Montas
Joseph Motta
Alexander Ratnovsky
Sondra Solomon
Toby Stone
Judy Tashji
Errol Thompson

15 Years of Service
Richard Brown
Hallie Cantor
Irina Derzhavets
June Glazer
Lancelot Green
Nadav Greenspan
Joseph Horowitz
Bryan Kartzman
Bettye Knight
Brian Shanblatt
Albert Stulman

10 Years of Service
Rochelle Brand
Rose Calka
Victor Campos
Luis Caraballo
Orlando Castillo
Bienvenido Castro
Louis Chillino
Frank Del Vecchio
Ursuline Destouche
Stuart Donner
Francisco Garcia
Wendy Ingram-Nunes
Leonard Judson
Angel Landeta
Matthew Levine
Ruben Lopez
Malka Micznik
Tonnie McRae
Verol Nelson
Chaim Nissel
Frances Nitschke
Anselmo Pena
Diane Paul
Roy Ramprasad
Neury Rodriguez
Jose Ruiz
Henry Sokoler
Jose Velazquez
Kecheng Yu
Walter Zee

Special Recognition
Jacob Blazer (53 years)
Joseph Ellenberg (62 years)
Reuben Heisler (51 years)

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Left to right are Shira Orbach, Shira Lankin, Avi Posnick, Alex Boris, Maytal Fligelman, and Jackie Saxe.

Mar 23, 2007 — Six Yeshiva University (YU) undergraduates, who were given Activist of the Year awards by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) at their annual policy conference in Washington DC last week, were recognized by YU’s Office of Student Affairs and YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) at a reception last Thursday night in Belfer Hall. Both offices supported and subsidized the students’ trips to the policy conference.

The awardees are Avi Posnick, president of YU Political Action Committee (YUPAC); Jackie Saxe, YU AIPAC Liaison; Alex Boris; Maytal Fligelman; Shira Lankin; and Shira Orbach.

The award, which recognizes the students’ work in strengthening the relationship between the United States and Israel, was a special achievement for YU according to AIPAC field organizer Daniel Ginsburg. “The passion of YU students for Israel has always been unswerving. Turning that commitment into activism required taking the commitment to another level and the award demonstrates their success against a field of other colleges.”

The award winners were part of a group of 14 YU students who attended the conference along with more than 1,200 students from 391 college and university campuses from all 50 states.

The well-attended reception included Rabbi Kenneth Brander, CJF dean, who delivered words of inspiration to deans, faculty, students and staff.

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Zack Pollack, who was chosen by students Richard Lewis, Josh Graber, and Mathew Cherney as their Jewish hero.

Mar 22, 2007 — It may not be the Oscars, but the suspense was just as great for the students vying for awards in the Center for Jewish Life’s short film competition, “Who is Your Jewish Hero?”.

Using the new communications lab in Belfer Hall, some 30 undergraduate students created short films on the Jewish hero of their choice. A panel of three judges chose the top eight films—all five minutes long, or less—and the audience at the Schottenstein Cultural Center screening on March 21 narrowed the field to five.

“By encouraging students to use the tools of modern media and draw on their personal creativity, we want to encourage their individual voices in building the Jewish future,” said Jordana Schoor, CJF’s director of special projects.

In an open invitation to YU undergraduates, would-be filmmakers were asked to celebrate a hero of their choice, someone “who means the most to you,” whether a friend, family member, or “someone from the annals of Jewish history.” Students began submitting their films on March 1, and the heroes they chose were as diverse as the films themselves.

In his film, which was chosen as one of the finalists, freshman Ariel Saidian chose to feature his grandfather, Samuel Saidian, one of the leaders of the Jewish Iranian community in New York. “After all the amazing things he has done, he has never received a moment of glory,” Mr. Saidian said. “My film is a tribute to my grandfather after an entire lifetime devoted to the Jewish community.”

For sophomore and fellow finalist Uri Westrich, the person most worthy of a film tribute is his friend Itai Baniel, with whom he served in the IDF. “In the film, I relate the heroism that Itai demonstrated last summer in the Lebanon war, and how he risked his life in order to save a fellow soldier,” Mr. Westrich explains.

Voting for the winning film is open on the center’s Web site at www.yu.edu/cjf/filmfest until midnight on Tuesday March 27. The grand prize winner will receive a $2,000 prize toward film equipment or Jewish books.

The top five movies, in no particular order, are:

Embracing the Dichotomy
Producers: Chai Hecht & Shealtiel Weinberg

Becoming a Hero: A Conversation with Dr. Rabbi Norman Lamm—The Past, Present, and Future of the Chancellor of Yeshiva University.

ChaZak
Producers: Richard Lewis, Josh Graber, and Mathew Cherney

Zack Pollack suffers from cerebral palsy. He has overcome his disabilities and serves as a role model and inspiration to all of those around him.

The Patriarch
Producer: Ariel Saidian

A tribute to a leader of the Iranian Jewish community, Samuel Saidian, this is the epic story of a man that has dedicated his life to the physical and spiritual well being of his community and was forced to flee his home country due to an anti-Semitic revolution.

Lchol Ish Yesh Shem: Every Person Has a Name
Producer: Uri Westrich

Itai Baniel, a close friend of the filmmaker, with whom he served in the Israeli Army. Itai’s story serves as an example of the incredible lengths that the members of the IDF went to in securing the safety of every Israeli soldier during Israel’s war with Lebanon last summer.

A Man of Ideals: The Story of Richard M. Joel
Producer: Jonah Raskas

A compilation of interviews describing Richard M. Joel’s reinvigoration of Hillel, The Campus for Jewish Life and his achievements as President of Yeshiva University. A film dedicated to showing the extraordinary qualities of a truly special person, a man of ideals.

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Mar 22, 2007 — In an edge-of-your-seat finale to the 16th Annual Red Sarachek High School Basketball Tournament, the Young Israel of Century City Panthers (YICC) clinched their sixth trophy as one of the star players from Chicago’s Ida Crown Jewish Academy Aces barely missed a three-point shot at the buzzer. To view tournament photo gallery click here.

The tournament, which features 18 Jewish high schools from across North America, is named for YU’s celebrated basketball coach, Bernard “Red” Sarachek, who died in 2005. Sarachek coached YU’s basketball team in 1942 and 1943, and from 1945 to 1969. During his career, he amassed more than 200 victories and pioneered strategies and methods that helped shape the modern game of basketball.

“It’s great to be here at YU,” said Myron Escovitz, father of YICC wing, Aaron Escovitz. “The boys meet kids from all of the other schools. They have a great time, but more importantly, they get great experience playing basketball.”

In this year’s five-day long tournament, Ida Crown dominated Columbus Torah Academy (Columbus, OH), Hebrew Academy of Five Towns Rockaway (Cedarhurst, NY), and top-seeded Frisch School (Paramus, NJ). Many excited fans and parents took time off to come to the championship game on YU’s Wilf Campus.

Howard Braun, coach of Chicago’s Ida Crown Jewish Academy, has nothing but praise for the Sarachek Tournament. “I think it’s terrific that YU brings together more than 200 Jewish students for five days to compete against each other,” said Coach Braun. Prior to coming to the tournament, the Ida Crown Aces had won 18 consecutive games in the Chicago Metro Prep Conference.

In addition to the five days of basketball, the tournament gives the players a chance to meet other young Jewish students from across North America and to spend Shabbat together.

This year’s participating schools were the Frisch School (Paramus, NJ); Moshe Aaron Yeshiva High School (South River, NJ); Young Israel of Century City (Los Angeles, CA); Ida Crown Jewish Academy (Chicago, IL); Shaarey Zedek (Valley Village, CA); Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway (Cedarhurst, NY); Yeshiva University’s Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (MSTA) (New York, NY); Ben Lipson Hillel Community High School (Miami, FL); Yeshivat Rambam (Baltimore, MD); Yeshiva Bnei Akiva Or Chaim (Toronto, Canada); Fuchs Mizrachi (Cleveland, OH); Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy (Overland Park, KS); Columbus Torah Academy (Columbus, OH); Cooper Yeshiva High School (Memphis, TN); Stern Hebrew High School (Philadelphia, PA); Hebrew Academy of Montreal (Montreal, Canada); Akiva Hebrew Day School (Southfield, MI); Block Yeshiva High School (St. Louis, MO).

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Mar 21, 2007 — Annual Red Sarachek High School Basketball Tournament Now in Its 16th Year

New York, New York, March 12, 2007 — Yeshiva University’s annual Red Sarachek High School Basketball Tournament, named for the university’s legendary men’s basketball coach, will be held March 15 – 19 at YU’s Max Stern Athletic Center on its Wilf Campus, 185th Street and Amsterdam Avenue in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan. The games will be broadcast live at www.macslive.com.

The tournament, now in its 16th year, is a prestigious event for Jewish high school students and attracts participants from all across the United States and Canada who compete for the championship trophy. Players representing 18 yeshiva high schools will spend Shabbat together off-campus along with YU administrators and students.

Howard Braun, coach of Chicago’s Ida Crown Jewish Academy, has nothing but praise for the Sarachek Tournament. “I think it’s terrific that YU brings together over 200 Jewish students for five days to compete against each other,” said Coach Braun, whose team has won 18 consecutive games in the Chicago Metro Prep Conference, and has two players being looked at by Division III college teams.

The Torah Academy of Bergen County (TABC) in Teaneck, NJ will host some of the games. The bid for the championship tips off at 2 pm on Monday, March 19 at YU’s Max Stern Athletic Center. The top eight teams from last year’s tournament are automatically qualified to play, with other schools chosen by lottery.

This year’s participating schools are the Frisch School (Paramus, NJ); Moshe Aaron Yeshiva High School (South River, NJ); Young Israel of Century City (Los Angeles, CA); Ida Crown Jewish Academy (Chicago, IL); Shaarey Zedek (Valley Village, CA) Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway (Cedarhurst, NY) Yeshiva University’s Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (MSTA) (New York, NY); Ben Lipson Hillel Community High School (Miami, FL); Yeshivat Rambam (Baltimore, MD); Yeshiva Bnei Akiva Or Chaim (Toronto, Canada); Fuchs Mizrachi (Cleveland, OH); Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy (Overland Park, KS); Columbus Torah Academy (Columbus, OH); Cooper Yeshiva High School (Memphis, TN); Stern Hebrew High School (Philadelphia, PA); Hebrew Academy of Montreal (Montreal, Canada); Akiva Hebrew Day School (Southfield, MI); Block Yeshiva High School (St. Louis, MO).

Bernard “Red” Sarachek, the tournament’s namesake who died in 2005, coached YU’s basketball team in 1942 and 1943, and from 1945 to 1969. During his career, he amassed more than 200 victories and pioneered strategies and methods that helped shape the modern game of basketball.

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(Left to right) Avi Posnick, president of YU Political Action Committee (YUPAC), AIPAC Field Organizer Daniel Ginsberg, and YU AIPAC Liaison Jackie Saxe.

Mar 19, 2007 — Six Yeshiva University (YU) undergraduates, under the leadership of Avi Posnick, president of the student-run Yeshiva University Public Action Committee (YUPAC), were awarded Activist of the Year honors last week at the annual American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington DC. The award recognizes the students’ work in strengthening the US-Israel relationship on campus.

They were part of a group of 14 Yeshiva University students who attended the conference along with more than 1,200 students from 391 college and university campuses in all 50 states.

This was the second year that YU attended the conference and the first time Yeshiva University students have won this significant award.

According to YU President Richard M. Joel, “These are critical times for Israel. By turning their beliefs into action, our students confirm their dedication both as Jews and as citizens of the United States and the world.”

Avi Posnick, a senior at Yeshiva College studying political science, says winning the award is significant because the students have demonstrated that they can be a powerful asset when it comes to political activism and pro-Israel advocacy.

“Over the past three years, we’ve augmented our own commitment to Israel with the guidance and resources provided by AIPAC,” said Mr. Posnick. “This is only a small example of what YU students have to offer and we believe that by receiving this award we will encourage more students to get involved.”

YUPAC has over 200 members, with four or five board members for each campus and about a dozen dedicated core students.

Jackie Saxe, a communications and political science student at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women, took on the role of AIPAC Campus Liaison because she “believes that her peers have unlimited potential to influence the political system in ways that support Israel.”

The other YU award winners are Alex Boris, Maytal Fligelman, Shira Lankin, and Shira Orbach.

Activism and advocacy through the political system “require taking a further step,” says Mr. Posnick. In addition to the two AIPAC conferences, YU’s Israel activist students have participated in political leadership conferences, an Advanced Advocacy Mission to Israel, and have spent time interning at AIPAC offices in Washington, DC and New York.

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Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein (right) and Rabbi Perry Tirschwell (left)

Mar 15, 2007 — More than 120 professional and lay leaders from across North America gathered in New Jersey in March for the annual Leadership Shabbaton of the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools and Yeshiva High Schools (AMODS), a division of Yeshiva University’s (YU) Center for the Jewish Future (CJF).

Addressing “Professional Development in Action” over the course of three days, participants devised strategies to incorporate the numerous resources available through AMODS, YU’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, and throughout the University to support the educational efforts of participating institutions. Among the many critical issues discussed was the impact that their educators’ serious professional growth might have on their schools and local communities.

In addition to hearing innovative speakers offer creative ideas and tackle numerous educational challenges, attendees had the opportunity to converse with prominent rabbis and leaders,including Rav Aharon Lichtenstein, Rosh Kollel of YU’s Gruss Kollel in Jerusalem and Rosh Yeshiva at Yeshivat Har Etzion. Rav Lichtenstein addressed questions about the value of a secular education as well as hashkafa-related questions.

Rather than render any definitive and binding Jewish legal decisions (responsa), Rav Lichtenstein chose to offer guidelines that would allow the questioners to arrive at their own determinations.

When asked about secular reading materials for day school students, Rav Lichtenstein noted that “the kind of spiritual diet you want to present [students] cannot be dealt with without some consideration of who you’re feeding.” In general, he avoided using categories such as permitted and prohibited. Rav Lichtenstein suggested that high-quality literature, such as that published in the Great Books series, has value because it is “inspirational, deals with fundamental issues of human nature, human destiny, of one’s relationship to the world, the Ribono Shel Olam and oneself.”

On the subject of Rav Joseph B. Soloveitchik’s view of high school coeducation, Rav Lichtenstein said “it would be foolish of me to discuss its permissibility.” Instead, he recommended that each community determine for itself which approach would yield the best results in terms of students attaining greater spirituality and a deeper level of Torah learning: “When a community is confronted with [the issue of] having a co-ed school or no school at all because of financial constraints, the fiscal viability of the sponsoring community warrants careful consideration.”

He also stated that the “decision to have separate-gender education should not disenfranchise one or the other of the genders, and that “there is a lot of good work being done within [coeducational schools] and a lot of good students coming out of them and I appreciate and admire all that’s being done by the mekhankhim and administration in those schools.”

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Mar 14, 2007 — On the morning of April 8, 2003, Dr. Donny George awoke to the sound of bombs exploding in the city of Baghdad as US forces invaded. He rushed to the Iraqi National Museum, where he was director, and together with the chair of the museum’s board and some staff, he hunkered down behind locked doors to keep watch over the museum’s antiquities.

“I felt very strongly—and still do—that the Iraq Museum’s collection represents the cultural heritage of mankind—it does not belong just to Iraqis,” Dr. George said at a presentation of slides documenting the looting of the museum and archeological sites, which was sponsored by the Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs and the Yeshiva College Office of the Dean on March 7.

Dr. George—who has devoted more than 30 years of his life to excavating, restoring, and preserving the region’s archeological riches—has been visiting professor of anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook since fleeing Baghdad last year, first to Damascus and then to Long Island.

When the museum became caught in the crossfire, Dr. George and his staff were forced to leave. Looters moved in, taking about 15,000 items and smashing many of those that they couldn’t remove. After learning about the destruction on the news, Dr. George appealed to the US army to protect the building, located precariously close to the hot spot of Haifa Street.

“The looters left glasscutters behind and didn’t touch many replicas, which leads us to believe that they came prepared and knew what they were doing,” he told the audience of YU students, faculty, and alumni.

After a period of amnesty was announced and rewards were offered for the return of various pieces, many antiquities were returned—3,709 to date. Nonetheless, the stolen objects—particularly clay tablets—have flooded underground markets in Europe, the United States, and Japan.

Dr. George shared his ideas for how to address the problem of looting. “The protection of antiquities should be regarded as a human rights issue and should be brought before the United Nations Security Council,” he said. “And museums should be built in such a way that they can defend themselves because there will be no-one guarding them in times of war.”

Although he no longer runs the museum—which remains sealed at this time—Dr. George continues to try to track down stolen material. “My pain is like a line of blood drawn in the sand from Baghdad to Damascus—and now to New York,” he said.

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Mar 12, 2007 — Yeshiva University’s annual Red Sarachek High School Basketball Tournament, named for the university’s legendary men’s basketball coach, will be held March 15 – 19 at YU’s Max Stern Athletic Center on its Wilf Campus, 185th Street and Amsterdam Avenue in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan. The games will be broadcast live at www.macslive.com.

The tournament, now in its 16th year, is a prestigious event for Jewish high school students and attracts participants from all across the United States and Canada who compete for the championship trophy. Players representing 18 yeshiva high schools will spend Shabbat together off-campus along with YU administrators and students.

Howard Braun, coach of Chicago’s Ida Crown Jewish Academy, has nothing but praise for the Sarachek Tournament. “I think it’s terrific that YU brings together over 200 Jewish students for five days to compete against each other,” said Coach Braun, whose team has won 18 consecutive games in the Chicago Metro Prep Conference, and has two players being looked at by Division III college teams.

The Torah Academy of Bergen County (TABC) in Teaneck, NJ will host some of the games. The bid for the championship tips off at 2 pm on Monday, March 19 at YU’s Max Stern Athletic Center. The top eight teams from last year’s tournament are automatically qualified to play, with other schools chosen by lottery.

This year’s participating schools are the Frisch School (Paramus, NJ); Moshe Aaron Yeshiva High School (South River, NJ); Young Israel of Century City (Los Angeles, CA); Ida Crown Jewish Academy (Chicago, IL); Shaarey Zedek (Valley Village, CA) Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway (Cedarhurst, NY) Yeshiva University’s Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (MSTA) (New York, NY); Ben Lipson Hillel Community High School (Miami, FL); Yeshivat Rambam (Baltimore, MD); Yeshiva Bnei Akiva Or Chaim (Toronto, Canada); Fuchs Mizrachi (Cleveland, OH); Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy (Overland Park, KS); Columbus Torah Academy (Columbus, OH); Cooper Yeshiva High School (Memphis, TN); Stern Hebrew High School (Philadelphia, PA); Hebrew Academy of Montreal (Montreal, Canada); Akiva Hebrew Day School (Southfield, MI); Block Yeshiva High School (St. Louis, MO).

Bernard “Red” Sarachek, the tournament’s namesake who died in 2005, coached YU’s basketball team in 1942 and 1943, and from 1945 to 1969. During his career, he amassed more than 200 victories and pioneered strategies and methods that helped shape the modern game of basketball.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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