Yeshiva University News » 2007 » September

YU President Richard M. Joel (left) and Chairman of the Board Emeritus Ronald P. Stanton.

Sep 26, 2006 — Former YU chairman of the board and New York City industrialist Ronald P. Stanton has announced a gift of $100 million to Yeshiva University. The largest single gift ever in North America in support of Jewish education and Jewish life, Mr. Stanton’s contribution affirms his commitment to Yeshiva University’s distinctive mission and his endorsement of the strategic direction set by the University’s president, Richard M. Joel.

The contribution creates the Ronald P. Stanton Legacy, an innovative philanthropic fund to help realize the University’s bold strategic directions to enhance undergraduate and Jewish education. This “revolving” fund will provide the means to expeditiously pursue projects, acquisitions, and programs identified by the University President. The Ronald P. Stanton Legacy will benefit the University’s growth initiatives in facilities acquisition and renovation, the recruitment and retention of top quality faculty across the various disciplines, faculty research and scholarship, and undergraduate and Jewish education. Assets drawn from the fund will be replenished as named gifts for these initiatives are received from other benefactors.

Mr. Stanton is chairman of Transammonia, Inc., a private company that trades, distributes and transports fertilizer materials, liquefied petroleum gases, petrochemicals, and crude oil. Established by Mr. Stanton in 1965, Transammonia is listed by Forbes magazine as one of the nation’s 100 largest private corporations.

Born in 1928 in Wiesbaden, Germany, Mr. Stanton immigrated to the United States in 1937. His involvement with Yeshiva University began soon after, when he was offered a scholarship by Congregation Shearith Israel, the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue in New York, to study at the institution and prepare for a career in the rabbinate. He preferred a career in business, and chose to study economics at City College of New York, from which he graduated in 1950. However, he formed a long-standing personal and philanthropic relationship with the University. In 1976, he was elected to Yeshiva University’s Board of Trustees; in 1992, he was named a Vice Chairman and 10 years later was elected the seventh Chairman of the Board. He continues to serve as the longest serving member of the University’s board. As Chairman of the University’s successful $400 million capital campaign, launched in 2000, he guided the campaign to its goal in just three years. For that campaign, he established a $10 million capital fund.

“We are extremely grateful to Ron for his historic beneficence, as well as his steadfast confidence in Yeshiva University’s mission,” said President Richard M. Joel. “Indeed, Ron is ensuring that Yeshiva University solidifies its position as one of America’s ‘top-tier’ research universities, while also maintaining its unique identity in academia – a place where excellence in liberal arts and sciences is pursued hand-in-hand with the timeless teachings of the Jewish story, and where wisdom is brought to life through a value-centered education that fosters a heightened sense of advocacy and responsibility to the betterment of humanity.”

“The people who created Yeshiva University expressed a boldness of purpose and imagination as well as the dedication and willingness to give of themselves in order to achieve where we are today,” said Mr. Stanton. “I have confidence in President Joel’s far-reaching vision of where the University should be tomorrow, and am thankful to be able to give my own contribution to help him achieve it.”

A previous gift from Mr. Stanton endowed the Hedi Steinberg Library at Stern College for Women, the University’s undergraduate college of arts and sciences for women, named for Mr. Stanton’s mother. She was an inspiring life force for Mr. Stanton through her deep and abiding commitment to Jewish causes. This commitment was magnificently manifested in her efforts on behalf of Yeshiva University and other Jewish organizations.

Mr. Stanton was awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from the University in 1982.

In addition to his involvement with the University, Mr. Stanton is an honorary trustee of Congregation Shearith Israel, and a member of the boards of New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Lincoln Center.

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Sep 26, 2007 — When Columbia University announced that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was invited to speak on its Morningside Heights campus, Yeshiva University students immediately began organizing their protest. Despite being on vacation, at least 30 Yeshiva University students made their voices heard among the hundreds of other activists gathered to protest Ahmadinejad’s visit on Monday.

Jeremy Stern ’07Y, a second-year semikhah student at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) who is also completing a master’s degree at Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, felt that it was his duty as part of the academic community to go to Columbia and stand up for his beliefs. “We were not just protesting Ahmadinejad, but also that a university would take steps to give legitimacy on its campus to such a person. It is an issue for students across the board, not just at Columbia.”

The Yeshiva University contingent, organized by Stern with the help of fellow RIETS student and Columbia alumnus Eitan Ben David, assembled at the gates of Columbia bearing signs that read “Yeshiva University Won’t Talk With Terrorists,” “Don’t Talk With Terror,” and “Some Things Are Not Up For Discussion.”

Stern stressed that although “we are fully supportive of free speech, the issue is that this gives legitimacy to someone by letting him speak at Columbia. One can have the right to speak, but that doesn’t mean you have to give him a platform to spread his views.”

Other YU students, including many from Yeshiva University High School, and President Richard M. Joel gathered at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza across from the United Nations, where Ahmadinejad spoke on Tuesday. YU’s Office of Student Affairs distributed hundreds of thunder sticks to the protesters.

“Our students were there as proud Jews and Americans to send forth the message that we should not sanction giving bigotry and injustice a platform,” said President Joel. “I was honored to raise my voice alongside them.”

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Dr. Jeffrey Glanz

Sep 26, 2007 — Jeffrey Glanz, Ed.D, has been appointed the inaugural occupant of the Stanley and Raine Silverstein Chair in Professional Ethics and Values in Jewish Education at the Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration at Yeshiva University (YU). Dr. Glanz recently joined the Azrieli faculty after a long and distinguished career as a teacher and assistant principal in the New York City public school system, as a dean of graduate programs, and as a university professor.

“Dr. Glanz brings years of outstanding experience in public education and on the university campus, along with a long and impressive list of publications in many of the most prestigious journals in our discipline,” said Azrieli’s Dean David Schnall. “Dr. Glanz’s appointment to the Silverstein Chair signals a major contribution to the field as he sets his considerable talents toward the needs of Jewish education in all its facets.”

A sought-after speaker at national conferences, Dr. Glanz joins Azrieli as a full professor with tenure. He brings his broad array of scholarly and professional interests to his position including supervision, educational leadership, administration, curriculum, and teaching of history, theory, and practice; ethical and transformative leadership; leadership styles; establishing schools as collaborative learning communities; teaching of ethics in day schools and yeshivot; and education during and after the Holocaust.

‘I am honored and humbled to hold the Raine and Stanley Silverstein Chair in Professional Ethics and Values,” said Dr. Glanz. “Whether it’s talking about ethical behavior in the classroom, sifting through the moral dilemmas educators face daily, or discussing the viability of setting standards in Jewish education, this chair, so graciously donated by the Silverstein family, can serve as the fulcrum for much-needed attention to the study of ethics at Azrieli.”

Mr. Silverstein, founder and chairman of Nina Footwear and director of the Children’s Place Retail Stores, Inc. was recently awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters by YU at the university’s 76th annual commencement exercises in May. He is a longtime supporter of YU.

Prior to coming to YU, Dr. Glanz served as Dean of Graduate Programs and Chair of the Department of Education at Wagner College in Staten Island. Earlier, he served as executive assistant to the president of Kean University in Union, NJ. He was named Graduate Teacher of the Year in 1999 by the Student Graduate Association and was also that year’s recipient of the Presidential Award for Outstanding Scholarship.

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Dr. Srinath Reddy, president of the Public Health Foundation of India, gave the keynote address.

Sep 25, 2007 — Yeshiva University brought the public health systems of India and the United States closer together last week when President Richard M. Joel signed a historic memo of understanding with his counterpart from the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) at a conference, “Diversity and Disparity in Health,” sponsored by YU’s Institute of Public Health Sciences. The newly created institute is a joint project of Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology.

Read President Joel’s Condolences for Mumbai Tragedy

The agreement—the first of its kind between the PHFI and a New York institution—will provide world-class educational opportunities for both entities through interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study and will create unique perspectives on health and well-being to catalyze change in both nations’ public health systems.

More than 150 medical and psychology professionals, students, and faculty gathered for the two-day conference at the Geraldine Schottenstein Center on YU’s Beren Campus.

“Science discovers, medicine develops, and public health delivers,” said Dr. Srinath Reddy, president of PHFI, before signing the memo. “This trinity will be evident in our collaboration.”

Dr. Reddy discussed India’s major public health challenges in his keynote address at the conference. He focused on cardiovascular disease and pointed out that the disease’s prevalence in India varies along socioeconomic, geographic, and gender gradients. Dr. Reddy urged the country’s medical community to influence government to address these disparities by enacting effective policy changes.

“The conference was about empowering diverse people living in disparate circumstances toward optimal health and well-being,” said Sonia Suchday, PhD, assistant professor at Ferkauf and co-director of the Institute of Public Health Sciences with Dr. Paul Marantz, associate dean for clinical research education and professor of clinical epidemiology and population health at Einstein. “The institute’s activities will focus on innovative research and education to inform public health.”

Other speakers at the conference discussed health disparities in the United States. Dr. David G. Schlundt of Vanderbilt University discussed the risk of diabetes and obesity in a predominantly African-American urban area of Nashville, TN. Dr. Olajide Williams of Columbia University described the success of his stroke intervention program aimed at teaching young Harlem children the warning signs of stroke so that they, in turn, could inform their parents.

Trudy Spencer, a Hunter College graduate student, said she came to the conference to add to her professional knowledge. “As a home care nurse, I see how differently patients are treated if they don’t have insurance versus those that do,” Ms. Spencer said. “I came to this conference to broaden my knowledge of disparities that I see every day as a registered nurse.”

The Institute of Public Health Sciences sponsors conferences, conducts research, issues papers, and searches for viable answers to global health problems. This conference, which celebrated the 50th anniversary of Ferkauf Graduate School, was the institute’s inaugural conference and was cosponsored by the American Psychological Association and the Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University.

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Sep 24, 2007 — Some came to read favorite pieces of literature – John Donne’s sonnet, Death Be Not Proud, the George Herbert poem, Life – some came to read tehilim (Psalms). Some held back tears; others gave vent to their emotions. They all came to reflect on the life of Dr. Lana Schwebel, a dear friend, colleague and spirited teacher who died on July 7, following an automobile accident while touring the shores of Lake Baikal in southern Siberia.

The student-organized, open-microphone memorial on September 17 was attended by people from across the Yeshiva University (YU) community including YU President Richard M. Joel, and Dr. Karen Bacon, the Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean at YU’s Stern College for Women (SCW).

President Joel spoke about the reflective nature of Unetaneh Tokef (a prayer recited on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). “Even though man is like a withering flower, a passing dream, in order to be those things one has to first be a flower, there has to first be a dream. Lana was our flower – she was full of dreams and hopes,” said President Joel.

“Some people are able to live in either the world of ideas or the world of reality, but few people can be equally comfortable in both. Lana was one of those people,” said Dean Bacon.

Perhaps the most moving tributes came from her students – those whose lives she influenced at the very time when people yearn for a teacher to help them find their own voices and their own paths through life.

Shira Margulies spoke about how she could finally share her passion for Harry Potter with a teacher. Dr. Schwebel taught Latin to Ms. Margulies and they studied it together. When Ms. Margulies found out that Harry Potter was available in a Latin translation she told Dr. Schwebel, who said “I know isn’t that cool, I have a copy!”

Shira Schwartz (SCW’08), who organized the memorial, closed with a reading from Dr. Schwebel’s own
Tanakh – a discussion of the relationship between Elijah and Elisha his student.

Formerly an assistant professor of religion and literature at the Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School, Dr. Schwebel had been an assistant professor of English at SCW since 2006.
Ann Peters, a colleague of Dr. Schwebel’s in the English Department, said of her late friend and fellow teacher: “She was not only an expert on literature, but on dance, theater, New York restaurants, modern art, China, obscure Russian orthodox religious practices—really, there seemed to be nothing she hadn’t explored. Yet, she never passed on information in a way that made you feel she was showing off. Her teaching came out of a generous need to communicate.”

Dr. Schwebel, who held a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Barnard, taught Survey of English Literature, Love and War in Medieval Romance, Elementary Latin, Women in Medieval Literature and Masterpieces of World Literature.

Students have created a blog where they and others share thoughts about Dr. Schwebel and the impact her death has had on them – drlanaschwebel.blogspot.com.

She is survived by her parents, Philip and Lilly Schwebel, and her sisters Elizabeth Wind (and Shalom) and Pamela Swickley (and Gary).

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Nilda I. Soto, assistant dean for diversity enhancement at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Sep 21, 2007 — Nilda I. Soto, assistant dean for diversity enhancement at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, has been appointed by Governor Eliot Spitzer to serve on the New York State Minority Health Council. Ms. Soto’s term of service will be through March 2010.

As a member of the Minority Health Council, which was established in 1992, Ms. Soto will work with other council members in considering matters relating to minority health. In addition, Ms.Soto and other members of the Minority Health Council will submit recommendations to the Commissioner of Health.

A native of the Bronx, Ms. Soto has been a member of Einstein’s administration since 1990. In her role as assistant dean of diversity enhancement, Ms. Soto administers and supervises all minority student activities at the medical school, and is involved in the recruitment, admission, and retention of individuals underrepresented in medicine.

She serves as director of both the Einstein Enrichment Program and the Minority Students Summer Research Opportunity Program. The former offers educational components to minority and economically disadvantaged high school students during the school year and summer, while the latter places minority undergraduate students in the laboratories of Einstein researchers for a nine-week period during the summer.

Ms. Soto received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Fordham University. In addition to her new membership on the Minority Health Council, she currently serves as Vice President of the Association of Hispanic Healthcare Executives, as a member of the Board of Friends of the Double Discovery Center at Columbia University, and as Chair of the LeGrand Newman Scholarship Committee for the Northeast Region of the National Association of Medical Minority Educators, Inc.

Ms. Soto is a resident of the Bronx.

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Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of Einstein’s Institute for Aging Research.

Sep 20, 2007 — Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University has been awarded a grant of more than $9.25 million from the National Institutes of Health to further the medical school’s study of centenarians and the biology of aging.

Led by Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of Einstein’s Institute for Aging Research, the research will build on the team’s previous work to identify genes that appear to contribute to exceptional longevity in humans, and to assess the associations among these genes with the delay or absence of age-related diseases such as heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. To date, Dr. Barzilai and colleagues have identified several biological markers that, they believe, may have contributed to the health and long lives of the centenarians and their families—numbering over 400—who have participated in Einstein’s Longevity
Genes Project.

The NIH grant will support a program of integrated projects, which are aimed at illuminating and expanding the current knowledge of the biological mechanisms of healthy aging. Research goals include:

*identifying additional genes and genetic variations within genes associated with longevity;
*identifying the ways these genes and their variants interact in humans;
*identifying the specific mechanisms of these genes and their variants, as well as theirroles in the onset or absence of age-related diseases and/or mental and physical preservation;
*examining whether these longevity genes are likely to affect the incidence of cardiovascular disease and other life-threatening illnesses in the offspring of centenarians; and
*examining whether these longevity genes affect the incidence of cognitive impairment in relation to the presence of favorable genotypes and their phenotypic expression.

“We are very grateful to the NIH for its support,” said Dr. Barzilai, who also is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Aging Research at Einstein, as well as professor of medicine and of molecular genetics. “We have in place a strong interdisciplinary team of Einstein investigators, including specialists in the fields of gerontology, neurology, genetics, epidemiology, and statistical genetics. These exceptional individuals have collaborated on our previous longevity research and we will continue our work together in this critical next phase, afforded by the NIH grant.”

He added, “Ultimately, our goal is to learn, on a biomechanical and molecular basis, how to prevent heart disease, strokes, dementia, and other ailments associated with aging. We anticipate that these insights could lead to new modes of prevention against and treatment strategies for these diseases. As such, we believe that our research will have a profound impact on both the length and quality of life for all of us.”

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Dr. Lana Schwebel

Sep 20, 2007 — Some came to read favorite pieces of literature – John Donne’s sonnet, Death Be Not Proud, the George Herbert poem, Life – some came to read tehilim (Psalms). Some held back tears; others gave vent to their emotions. They all came to reflect on the life of Dr. Lana Schwebel, a dear friend, colleague and spirited teacher who died on July 7, following an automobile accident while touring the shores of Lake Baikal in southern Siberia.

The student-organized, open-microphone memorial on September 17 was attended by people from across the Yeshiva University (YU) community including YU President Richard M. Joel, and Dr. Karen Bacon, the Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean at YU’s Stern College for Women (SCW).

President Joel spoke about the reflective nature of Unetaneh Tokef (a prayer recited on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). “Even though man is like a withering flower, a passing dream, in order to be those things one has to first be a flower, there has to first be a dream. Lana was our flower – she was full of dreams and hopes,” said President Joel.

“Some people are able to live in either the world of ideas or the world of reality, but few people can be equally comfortable in both. Lana was one of those people,” said Dean Bacon.

Perhaps the most moving tributes came from her students – those whose lives she influenced at the very time when people yearn for a teacher to help them find their own voices and their own paths through life.

Shira Margulies (SCW ’08) spoke about how she could finally share her passion for Harry Potter with a teacher. Dr. Schwebel taught Latin to Ms. Margulies and they studied it together. When Ms. Margulies found out that Harry Potter was available in a Latin translation she told Dr. Schwebel, who said “I know isn’t that cool, I have a copy!”

Shira Schwartz (SCW’08), who organized the memorial, closed with a reading from Dr. Schwebel’s own Tanakh – a discussion of the relationship between Elijah and Elisha his student.

Formerly an assistant professor of religion and literature at the Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School, Dr. Schwebel had been an assistant professor of English at SCW since 2006.

Ann Peters, a colleague of Dr. Schwebel’s in the English Department, said of her late friend and fellow teacher, “She was not only an expert on literature, but on dance, theater, New York restaurants, modern art, China, obscure Russian orthodox religious practices—really, there seemed to be nothing she hadn’t explored. Yet, she never passed on information in a way that made you feel she was showing off. Her teaching came out of a generous need to communicate.”

Dr. Schwebel, who held a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Barnard, taught Survey of English Literature, Love and War in Medieval Romance, Elementary Latin, Women in Medieval Literature and Masterpieces of World Literature.

Students have created a blog where they and others share thoughts about Dr. Schwebel and the impact her death has had on them.

Dr. Schwebel is survived by her parents, Philip and Lilly Schwebel, and her sisters Elizabeth Wind (and Shalom) and Pamela Swickley (and Gary).

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Sep 19, 2007 — Six hundred high school students spent Wednesday evening preparing for one of the yamim noraim (days of awe) in a special way.

They got a taste of Yeshiva University’s (YU) vibrant beit midrash (study) experience when they visited YU’s uptown Wilf campus and midtown Israel Henry Beren campus last night for an evening of chaburah learning (small group discussion of Jewish texts) suffused with the university’s singular brand of ruach (spirit).

The chaburah learning was followed by shiurim (lectures) led by some of YU’s most learned and inspiring rabbis and teachers. It is part of the Torah Leadership Network (TLN), a program coordinated by Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future (CJF).

Each high school student learned in a small group with a YU undergraduate or student from the YU affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) in preparation for Yom Kippur (the day of atonement).

“Chaburah learning is a very special experience,” said Raffi Rosenzweig, a 2007 Yeshiva College (YC) graduate who is now a YU Presidential Fellow. “Learning with a small group of peers allows you to challenge yourself intellectually in a way that doesn’t always work in the more general setting of a classroom. It’s more focused, more nuanced – it makes you push yourself to a higher level.”

As a way to enhance this exceptional experience, each participant received a copy of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik’s makhzor (prayer book for Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur with commentary adapted from the teachings of Rabbi Soloveitchik). Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik (1903-1993), known as the Rav, was the world-renowned scholar at RIETS. He served as an advisor, guide, mentor, and role model for the Jewish community, both as a Talmudic scholar and as a religious leader. “It’s a special way to celebrate the history and wisdom of YU and to pass on the Rav’s insights to the next generation,” said Philip Moskowitz of CJF, who is coordinating the program.

The TLN boy’s evening shiurim were led by Rabbi Daniel Rapp, assistant visiting professor of Talmud at RIETS and assistant dean of undergraduate Judaic studies at YU and Rabbi Andi Yudin, Talmud instructor at the Marsha Stern Talmudic Academy Yeshiva high school for boys (MSTA) and rosh kollel (principal) at DRS yeshiva high school for boys.

The TLN girl’s evening shiurim were led by Rabbi Josh Blass, mashgiach ruchani (spiritual advisor) at RIETS, and Mrs. Shira Schiowitz, a noted Tanakh (the five books of the Torah plus the books of the prophets and additional writings) instructor. All are noted for their abilities to illuminate and make accessible even the most complex texts.

The students, from high schools all over the tri-state area, who had to apply to take part in the program, are part of a high school Torah leadership movement designed “to bring them in contact with role models who can help them grow as confident Jewish teenagers,” said Rabbi Aaron Leibowitz, interim director of Community Initiatives at CJF. ““High school students have the unique opportunity to experience the energy and vibrancy of YU. The camaraderie that is fostered here helps to nurture them as committed Jews,” said Rabbi Leibowitz. This is just one of several programs that take place throughout the year that revolve around Torah and personal leadership growth.

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Sep 18, 2007 — It began with contributions as small as $180, and has grown into a sum of more than $100,000 in just one year. The YC100 Fund, established by Shai Barnea ’03Y and Josh Goldman ’04SB in September 2006, recently highlighted its exponential growth at a shareholder’s meeting celebrating its first anniversary. The fund is focused on long-term asset appreciation, with the goal of turning over a sizable contribution to the college at full maturity.

Barnea, an energy trader at Sempra, and Goldman, who works at Kraft Foods, decided the college needed a fund to which alumni could contribute as much or as little seed money as they were able in the short term, invest it for a number of years, then give that compounded donation to the college in the long term.

“A lot of people want to give back to the school, but not everyone can make a massive donation,” Barnea said. “This enables people to invest in the future of Yeshiva College and Yeshiva University, to be long-term partners, and to effect change.”

Goldman added, “The YC100 Fund brings philanthropy down to a grass-roots level. It’s an opportunity for people to say, ‘My little piece will mean something.’”

Barnea and Goldman, co-chairmen of the fund, are in the midst of forming a board of directors who will help determine how the monies are dispersed. While the future needs of the university will ultimately determine the specific projects the fund assists, they have found a high level of interest among alumni and friends of the university who desire to play a greater role in making great things happen on campus.

Barnea got the idea for YC100 from the Yale University class of ’54, which contributed the largest class gift in history to its alma mater by pooling their resources and gathering over the next couple of years about $370,000 in seed money, which they entrusted to a professional money manager. Twenty-five years later, at the class’s 50th reunion, they turned it all over to Yale—more than $110 million.

Goldman jumped on board. “We had just graduated, and it was the perfect way to flip the switch from being active in the short term to the long term,” he said. “It struck us as a way to look toward the next generation of students.”

The two approached Yeshiva College board members, who were equally enthusiastic.

“While many of us are not able to make a donation that can have an immediate and lasting impact on the university, many of us have the desire to give back to our alma mater,” Goldman said. “The hope is that YC100 will turn a small amount into a large one, and deliver a bigger gift to YU than would have ever been possible the old-fashioned way.”

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