Yeshiva University News » 2010 » August » 24

Aug 24, 2010 — Six Yeshiva University students will intensify their focus on advanced undergraduate-level research this year as part of the Henry Kressel Research Scholarship program. The scholarship—established by Dr. Henry Kressel, chairman of the YU Board of Trustees, managing director of Warburg Pincus LLC and a Yeshiva College graduate—offers students the unique opportunity to craft a year-long intensive research project under the direct supervision of University faculty.

“This is the third year of the program and I am delighted with the achievement of the scholars,” said Dr. Kressel. “Our goal was to provide the opportunity for promising students to perform creative research with our outstanding faculty. Not only have these students gone on to excellent graduate and professional schools, but they have also received prestigious fellowships, including our first ever Carnegie and Fulbright Fellowships, as well as a National Science Fellowship.”

This year’s recipients are Joseph Attias, a philosophy major; Or Pikary, accounting; Ben Rosenzweig, psychology; Michael Turkel, English; and physics majors Dassi Shulman and Aaron Yevick.

The students’ research, each conducted under the mentorship of a faculty member, will focus on a variety of subjects.

Shulman will be mentored by Dr. Emil Prodan, assistant professor of physics at Stern College for Women, and will explore several fundamental aspects of a recently discovered state of matter called the topological insulating state.

“Having access to high-tech science facilities where I can pursue my physics and engineering studies and research opportunities such as the Kressel Scholarship has enabled me to develop my understanding and love of science and propel me forward in my career,” said Shulman, who hopes to pursue a career in structural engineering.

Pikary, the first Sy Syms School of Business student to be awarded the scholarship, will be conducting his research under the guidance of Dr. Joseph Kerstein, associate professor of accounting at Sy Syms.

“Through Yeshiva University’s strong offering of both Judaic and secular education, I’ve been able to grow both academically and as a Jew with strong ethical values that can better society,” said Pikary. “I have therefore become particularly interested in researching what types of corporate governance are associated with firms who choose to act ethically to meet their responsibilities under SEC disclosure rules.”

The scholars will each receive a stipend of $7,500 for the year, along with travel money and appropriate research-support expenses. Following their research tenure, Kressel Scholars will present their work to the student body to stimulate a larger intellectual discussion on their topics.

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Aug 24, 2010 — More than 600 men and women from all corners of the world flooded Yeshiva University’s Wilf and Beren campuses this week to begin their undergraduate study at the only institution that promises to enrich both their secular and spiritual knowledge.

Hailing from more than a dozen countries as far as India and Panama and states across the country, these students were drawn to YU by its unique mission, articulated by President Richard M. Joel in his opening address to new Yeshiva College students at an orientation barbeque. “A lot of young people today ask, ‘Do I matter?’ ” President Joel said. “I believe you’ve come to a makom [place] where together, individually and collectively, we can build worlds. Here, living by Torah values, you can equip yourselves to be great talmedei chachumim [Torah scholars], great scientists, great poets, great teachers…you can advance the sacred story of our people: G-d’s partnership with Avraham and Avraham’s partnership with G-d.”

[flickrslideshow acct_name="yeshivauniversity" id="72157624783490030"]

This year’s Orientation was jam-packed with vibrant and exciting events. New students on the Beren Campus got acquainted with club leaders at a “Chillin & Grillin” barbeque, engaged in chavruta learning at the new Lea and Leon Eisenberg Beit Midrash in Stanton Hall and explored New York City’s rich cultural offerings on a walking tour of the Brooklyn Bridge. Students on the Wilf Campus shared high tea with their new faculty mentors and heard about engaging opportunities to contribute to the global Jewish community from members of the University’s Center for the Jewish Future. And there’s always room for sheer fun: along with their counterparts at Stern College for Women, first-year students headed to New Roc City for a night of bowling, laser-tag and arcade games.

The excitement and ambition of these new beginnings is palpable. For Aliza Loshinsky of Brooklyn, NY, Stern College was the perfect place to cultivate her talents and interests while maintaining a strong connection to the Jewish community. “I hope to be able to use this opportunity to learn more and grow in my Judaism and to develop my strengths in a way that will benefit my family, my people and the world,” she said. Loshinsky is considering psychology as a major.

Davida Kollmar of Edison, NJ, felt drawn to the warm atmosphere fostered at Stern College. “I was impressed by the individual attention given to each student to help her achieve her goals,” she said. She intends to pursue a degree in math or science.

Shlomo Weissberg of Chicago, IL, wanted the opportunity to meet students from a wide range of backgrounds and Jewish traditions in a friendly environment. Hoping to major in accounting at Sy Syms School of Business, he is also excited to engage the learning community at YU. “The new beit midrash is really gorgeous,” he said.

Entering the college arena can be overwhelming. Yet Brad Karasik, associate dean of students at Yeshiva College, urged new students not to be afraid to dive in. “It’s your campus,” he said. “There are so many things waiting for you to take charge of and become active in. Student clubs range from academic interests to Israel advocacy to chessed [volunteer] opportunities and we have hundreds of students on campus for Shabbat every week. The atmosphere here is incredible.”

Zelda Braun, associate dean of students at Stern College, agreed. “Be open to new experiences, to meeting new people, to exploring new areas of interest,” she said. “You have a world of opportunity available to you.”

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Jonathan Schwab is a member of the teaching fellowship program’s inaugural cohort.

Aug 24, 2010 — This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.

Comments

Six Selected to Participate in Kressel Research Scholarship Program, Now in its Third Year

2010 Kressel Research Scholars

Six Yeshiva University students will intensify their focus on advanced undergraduate-level research this year as part of the Henry Kressel Research Scholarship program. The scholarship—established by Dr. Henry Kressel, chairman of the YU Board of Trustees, managing director of Warburg Pincus LLC and a Yeshiva College graduate—offers students the unique opportunity to craft a year-long intensive research project under the direct supervision of University faculty.

“This is the third year of the program and I am delighted with the achievement of the scholars,” said Dr. Kressel. “Our goal was to provide the opportunity for promising students to perform creative research with our outstanding faculty. Not only have these students gone on to excellent graduate and professional schools, but they have also received prestigious fellowships, including our first everCarnegie and Fulbright Fellowships, as well as a National Science Fellowship.”

This year’s recipients are Joseph Attias, a philosophy major; Or Pikary, accounting; Ben Rosenzweig, psychology; Michael Turkel, English; and physics majors Dassi Shulman and Aaron Yevick.

The students’ research, each conducted under the mentorship of a faculty member, will focus on a variety of subjects.

Shulman will be mentored by Dr. Emil Prodan, assistant professor of physics at Stern College for Women, and will explore several fundamental aspects of a recently discovered state of matter called the topological insulating state.

“Having access to high-tech science facilities where I can pursue my physics and engineering studies and research opportunities such as the Kressel Scholarship has enabled me to develop my understanding and love of science and propel me forward in my career,” said Shulman, who hopes to pursue a career in structural engineering.

Pikary, the first Sy Syms School of Business student to be awarded the scholarship, will be conducting his research under the guidance of Dr. Joseph Kerstein, associate professor of accounting at Sy Syms.

“Through Yeshiva University’s strong offering of both Judaic and secular education, I’ve been able to grow both academically and as a Jew with strong ethical values that can better society,” said Pikary. “I have therefore become particularly interested in researching what types of corporate governance are associated with firms who choose to act ethically to meet their responsibilities under SEC disclosure rules.”

The scholars will each receive a stipend of $7,500 for the year, along with travel money and appropriate research-support expenses. Following their research tenure, Kressel Scholars will present their work to the student body to stimulate a larger intellectual discussion on their topics.

Comments

Ambitious Students Prepare to Embark on Their Yeshiva University Journey

More than 600 men and women from all corners of the world flooded Yeshiva University’s Wilf and Beren campuses this week to begin their undergraduate study at the only institution that promises to enrich both their secular and spiritual knowledge.

Hailing from more than a dozen countries as far as India and Panama and states across the country, these students were drawn to YU by its unique mission, articulated by President Richard M. Joel in his opening address to new Yeshiva College students at an orientation barbeque. “A lot of young people today ask, ‘Do I matter?’ ” President Joel said. “I believe you’ve come to a makom [place] where together, individually and collectively, we can build worlds. Here, living by Torah values, you can equip yourselves to be great talmedei chachumim [Torah scholars], great scientists, great poets, great teachers…you can advance the sacred story of our people: G-d’s partnership with Avraham and Avraham’s partnership with G-d.”

[flickrslideshow acct_name="yeshivauniversity" id="72157624783490030"]

This year’s Orientation was jam-packed with vibrant and exciting events. New students on the Beren Campus got acquainted with club leaders at a “Chillin & Grillin” barbeque, engaged in chavruta learning at the new Lea and Leon Eisenberg Beit Midrash in Stanton Hall and explored New York City’s rich cultural offerings on a walking tour of the Brooklyn Bridge. Students on the Wilf Campus shared high tea with their new faculty mentors and heard about engaging opportunities to contribute to the global Jewish community from members of the University’s Center for the Jewish Future. And there’s always room for sheer fun: along with their counterparts at Stern College for Women, first-year students headed to New Roc City for a night of bowling, laser-tag and arcade games.

The excitement and ambition of these new beginnings is palpable. For Aliza Loshinsky of Brooklyn, NY, Stern College was the perfect place to cultivate her talents and interests while maintaining a strong connection to the Jewish community. “I hope to be able to use this opportunity to learn more and grow in my Judaism and to develop my strengths in a way that will benefit my family, my people and the world,” she said. Loshinsky is considering psychology as a major.

Davida Kollmar of Edison, NJ, felt drawn to the warm atmosphere fostered at Stern College. “I was impressed by the individual attention given to each student to help her achieve her goals,” she said. She intends to pursue a degree in math or science.

Shlomo Weissberg of Chicago, IL, wanted the opportunity to meet students from a wide range of backgrounds and Jewish traditions in a friendly environment. Hoping to major in accounting at Sy Syms School of Business, he is also excited to engage the learning community at YU. “The new beit midrash is really gorgeous,” he said.

Entering the college arena can be overwhelming. Yet Brad Karasik, associate dean of students at Yeshiva College, urged new students not to be afraid to dive in. “It’s your campus,” he said. “There are so many things waiting for you to take charge of and become active in. Student clubs range from academic interests to Israel advocacy to chessed [volunteer] opportunities and we have hundreds of students on campus for Shabbat every week. The atmosphere here is incredible.”

Zelda Braun, associate dean of students at Stern College, agreed. “Be open to new experiences, to meeting new people, to exploring new areas of interest,” she said. “You have a world of opportunity available to you.”

Comments

New Teaching Fellowship Program Allows Honors Students to Serve as Teaching Assistants

Article Photo

Jonathan Schwab is a member of the teaching fellowship program’s inaugural cohort.

This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.

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