Yeshiva University News » Beit Midrash

The Beit Midrash will be led by RIETS graduate, Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner

Aug 18, 2009 — The Toronto Jewish community will be home to the Yeshiva University (YU) Torah Mitzion Beit Midrash (intensive Torah and Talmud study program) of Toronto beginning September, 2009. The Beit Midrash is an affiliate of YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) and Kollel Torah Mitzion. The mission of the Beit Midrash is to enrich and engage the greater Toronto Jewish community with inspired Torah living and learning. It will harness the resources of YU and its affiliates by deploying its scholars to service the local synagogues, day schools, youth movements, young couples, college students and the Federation community. While it will serve the entire Toronto Jewish community it will be located at the Clanton Park Synagogue, 11 Lowesmoor Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

“The Toronto Beit Midrash, a permanent cadre of Torah scholars who will reside in Toronto, will serve as a satellite of YU’s Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, (RIETS)” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner dean of CJF. “The multi-tiered program will tailor learning to the men, women and youth of the affiliated community, as well as reach out to the greater Jewish community.”

The Beit Midrash will be led by Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner, who was ordained at RIETS. He was the spiritual leader at Congregation Sons of Israel in Allentown, PA for eight years. Rabbi Torczyner excels in utilizing the Internet and social media outlets to spread Torah to people around the globe particularly with his WebShas online index to the Talmud. Rabbi Torczyner is also a member of the Rabbinical Council of America-Orthodox Union Joint Kashruth Commission, and the Rabbinical Council of America’s Task Force on Business Ethics.

Rabbi Azarya Berzon, a student of Rav Soloveitchik, was also ordained at RIETS will be a one year Beit Midrash Scholar-in-Residence. He taught in Israel for 13 years, served in the Israeli army for 14 years, and in 1991 established Yeshiva Sha’arei Mevasseret Zion where he served as Rosh Yeshiva (professor of Talmud) for 18 years.

“Toronto is already known for its commitment to Torah,” said Rabbi Torczyner. “We will add to that potent mix by disseminating Torah as well as presenting our unique emphasis on building bridges in the Jewish community, on supporting the State of Israel, and on engaging the broader society. We will serve communities across the religious spectrum including high school and college students.”

Under Rabbi Torczyner’s leadership, the Beit Midrash will foster an open, dynamic community of learning. “Even beginners with nominal Jewish education will be put on a trajectory to advance their Jewish learning and empower them to delve into the rich texts of our tradition,” added Rabbi Torczyner.

In addition to Rabbis Torczyner and Berzon the Beit Midrash will be comprised of four scholars who are dedicated to honing their skills as serious Jewish educators. A significant portion of their day will be dedicated to intensive analysis and research of the wisdom of Jewish tradition. Their interaction with the community will actualize and transmit their passion and knowledge to create a true community Beit Midrash.

Rabbi Brander further explained that “the Beit Midrash represents our continuing effort to shape and create experiences that will serve as incubators for Jewish leaders. They also represent a vibrant initiative to enable communities to experience the wealth of resources and presence of Yeshiva University right in their backyard.”

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Aug 17, 2009 — The Toronto Jewish community will be home to the Yeshiva University (YU) Torah Mitzion Beit Midrash (intensive Torah and Talmud study program) of Toronto beginning September, 2009. The Beit Midrash is an affiliate of YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) and Kollel Torah Mitzion. The mission of the Beit Midrash is to enrich and engage the greater Toronto Jewish community with inspired Torah living and learning. It will harness the resources of YU and its affiliates by deploying its scholars to service the local synagogues, day schools, youth movements, young couples, college students and the Federation community. While it will serve the entire Toronto Jewish community it will be located at the Clanton Park Synagogue, 11 Lowesmoor Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

“The Toronto Beit Midrash, a permanent cadre of Torah scholars who will reside in Toronto, will serve as a satellite of YU’s Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, (RIETS)” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner dean of CJF. “The multi-tiered program will tailor learning to the men, women and youth of the affiliated community, as well as reach out to the greater Jewish community.”

The Beit Midrash will be led by Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner, who was ordained at RIETS. He was the spiritual leader at Congregation Sons of Israel in Allentown, PA for eight years. Rabbi Torczyner excels in utilizing the Internet and social media outlets to spread Torah to people around the globe particularly with his WebShas online index to the Talmud. Rabbi Torczyner is also a member of the Rabbinical Council of America-Orthodox Union Joint Kashruth Commission, and the Rabbinical Council of America’s Task Force on Business Ethics.

Rabbi Azarya Berzon, a student of Rav Soloveitchik, was also ordained at RIETS will be a one year Beit Midrash Scholar-in-Residence. He taught in Israel for 13 years, served in the Israeli army for 14 years, and in 1991 established Yeshiva Sha’arei Mevasseret Zion where he served as Rosh Yeshiva (professor of Talmud) for 18 years.

“Toronto is already known for its commitment to Torah,” said Rabbi Torczyner. “We will add to that potent mix by disseminating Torah as well as presenting our unique emphasis on building bridges in the Jewish community, on supporting the State of Israel, and on engaging the broader society. We will serve communities across the religious spectrum including high school and college students.”

Under Rabbi Torczyner’s leadership, the Beit Midrash will foster an open, dynamic community of learning. “Even beginners with nominal Jewish education will be put on a trajectory to advance their Jewish learning and empower them to delve into the rich texts of our tradition,” added Rabbi Torczyner.

In addition to Rabbis Torczyner and Berzon the Beit Midrash will be comprised of four scholars who are dedicated to honing their skills as serious Jewish educators. A significant portion of their day will be dedicated to intensive analysis and research of the wisdom of Jewish tradition. Their interaction with the community will actualize and transmit their passion and knowledge to create a true community Beit Midrash.

Rabbi Brander further explained that “the Beit Midrash represents our continuing effort to shape and create experiences that will serve as incubators for Jewish leaders. They also represent a vibrant initiative to enable communities to experience the wealth of resources and presence of Yeshiva University right in their backyard.”

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Jul 1, 2009 — Yeshiva University, through its Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), will introduce a Torah learning program at Lincoln Square Synagogue this summer for women of all ages who want to pursue advanced Talmud and Judaic study. The Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program, which takes place July 6-29, affirms the University’s status as a pioneer in developing Orthodox Jewish women as scholars, teachers and community leaders.

The program, focusing on “Crisis, Hope and Leadership in Jewish Tradition,” will provide women of all ages and Jewish educational backgrounds with the knowledge and tools to become Judaic scholars, community leaders and role models for the Orthodox community.

See The Jewish Channel’s coverage of the program here:



The program is a component of the CJF’s annual Manhattan Beit Midrash Community Program, which has offerings for men, women and youth at Lincoln Square Synagogue.

Highlighting this year’s Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program will be a mini-course on Mondays and Wednesdays led by Elana Stein Hain, who completed advanced studies in Talmud at YU’s Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies (GPATS) and is the community scholar at Lincoln Square Synagogue, the first woman to hold such a position at the prominent New York house of worship. The position is sponsored by the CJF.

Hain’s mini-course, “Chabura: Sugya Survey Workshop,” will focus on a sampling of sugyot [Mishnaic texts] which are ripe for both the yeshiva/Brisker (Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik) method as well as academic perspectives. The workshop will include 30 minutes of chavruta [group study] helping participants develop and sharpen their learning skills.

“Women are partners in the leadership of the Jewish community,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner Dean of the CJF. “What this program does is provide the tools for them to grow intellectually and develop the knowledge necessary to take on this role. It’s an outgrowth of our commitment to women’s leadership and Jewish education that dates back 40 years to the founding of Stern College for Women, the Midreshet Yom Rishon held weekly on campus, the GPATS program and numerous leadership fellowships for women.”

In addition to Hain, the faculty for the Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program includes Rabbi Moshe Kahn, a faculty member of Stern College, the GPATS program, and the Drisha Institute, who will address “The Call of the Shofar: A Halakhic Analysis” on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays; and Dr. Shawn Zelig Aster, assistant professor of Bible at Yeshiva College, who will focus on “Sefer Yeshayahu: Text and History” on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. In addition, Rabbi Brander will give a special shiur [lecture] on “Justice, Human Rights and Morality: The Ethics of Warfare” on Tuesday, July 14 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

For adults of all ages, there is a rotating scholar series on Tuesday evenings, a three-week course on Wednesdays, July 8, 15 and 22, and a morning program. Among the faculty will be Rabbi Hayyim Angel of Congregation Shearith Israel of New York and instructor at Yeshiva College; Yael Leibowitz, an adjunct professor at Stern College; Rebbetzin Smadar Rosensweig, professor of Bible at Stern College; Dapha Fishman Secunda, director of women’s programming at the CJF; Dr. Shai Secunda, the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Postdoctoral Fellow in Judaic Studies at Yale University; Rabbi Dr. Jacob J. Schacter, University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought and senior scholar at the CJF; and Rabbi Dr. Jeffrey Woolf, senior lecturer in Talmud at Bar-Ilan University.

Among the topics they will address are: “Jeremiah’s Confrontation with the Religious Establishment”; “Maimonides’ Analysis of Sefer Iyov”; “Yehudah and David”; “Theological Reflections of National Suffering”; “Interactions between Judaism, Islam, and Christianity”; “Reflections on Tisha B’Av”: “Our Patriarch Avraham”; and “Notes from the Destruction in Eichah Rabbah.”

For more information on YU summer programs or to register, please contact DFishma2@yu.edu or call 212.340.7700 x 430.

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Jun 30, 2009 — Affirming its status as a pioneer in advanced Talmud and Judaic study for women and its four decade long commitment to developing Orthodox Jewish women as scholars, teachers, and community leaders, Yeshiva University, through its Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), will sponsor the Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program next month.

The program, “Crisis, Hope and Leadership in Jewish Tradition,” which will take place at Lincoln Square Synagogue, 200 Amsterdam Avenue, from July 6 to July 29, is designed to provide women of all ages and Jewish educational backgrounds with the knowledge and tools to become Judaic scholars, community leaders, and role models for the Orthodox community.

The program is a component of the CJF’s annual Manhattan Beit Midrash Community Program, which has offerings for men, women and youth at Lincoln Square Synagogue.

Highlighting this year’s Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program will be a mini-course on Mondays and Wednesdays led by Elana Stein Hain, who completed advanced studies in Talmud at YU’s Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies (GPATS) and current Community Scholar at Lincoln Square Synagogue, the first woman to hold such a position at the prominent New York house of worship. The position is sponsored by the CJF.

Hain’s mini-course, “Chabura: Sugya Survey Workshop,” will focus on a sampling of sugyot (Mishnaic texts) which are ripe for both the yeshiva/Brisker (Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik) method as well as academic perspectives. The workshop will include 30 minutes of chavruta (group study) helping participants develop and sharpen their learning skills.

“Women are partners in the leadership of the Jewish community,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner Dean of the CJF. “What this program does is provide the tools for them to grow intellectually and develop the knowledge necessary to take on this role. It’s an outgrowth of our commitment to women’s leadership and Jewish education that dates back 40 years to the founding of Stern College for Women, the Midreshet Yom Rishon held weekly on the YU campus, the GPATS program and numerous leadership fellowships for women.”

In addition to Hain, the faculty for the Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program includes Rabbi Moshe Kahn, a faculty member of Stern College, the GPATS program, and the Drisha Institute, who will address the “The Call of the Shofar: A Halakhic Analysis” on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays; and Dr. Shawn Zelig Aster, an Assistant Professor of Bible at Yeshiva College, who will focus on “Sefer Yeshayahu: Text and History” on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. In addition, Rabbi Brander will give a special shiur on “Justice, Human Rights and Morality: The Ethics of Warfare” on Tuesday, July 14 from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

“I am thrilled to be part of this progressive program,” said Ms. Hain. It gives me great satisfaction to help foster a vibrant environment of leadership and learning for women of all ages who, like me, have a deep interest in becoming scholars and role models within their community.”

For adults of all ages, there is a rotating scholar series on Tuesday evenings, a three-week course on Wednesdays, July 8, 15 and 22, and a morning program. Among the faculty will be Rabbi Hayyim Angel of Congregation Shearith Israel of New York and instructor at Yeshiva College; Yael Leibowitz, an adjunct professor at Stern College; Rebbetzin Smadar Rosensweig, professor of Bible at Stern College; Dapha Fishman Secunda, director of women’s programming at the CJF; Dr. Shai Secunda, the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Postdoctoral Fellow in Judaic Studies at Yale University; Rabbi Dr. Jacob J. Schacter, University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought and Senior Scholar at the CJF; and Rabbi Dr. Jeffrey Woolf, senior lecturer in Talmud at Bar-Ilan University.

Among the topics they will address are: “Jeremiah’s Confrontation with the Religious Establishment”; “Maimonides’ Analysis of Sefer Iyov”; “Yehudah and David”; “Theological Reflections of National Suffering”; “Interactions between Judaism, Islam, and Christianity”; “Reflections on Tisha B’Av”: “Our Patriarch Avraham”; and “Notes from the Destruction in Eichah Rabbah.”

For more information on YU summer programs or to register, please contact DFishma2@yu.edu or call 212.340.7700 x430.

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President Richard M. Joel (far left) with the children of the late Rabbi Israel Miller (L-R): Judy Kalish, Deborah Kram, Rabbi Michael Miller, and Rabbi Dovid Miller.

Mar 25, 2008 — The Yeshiva University (YU) Israel Beit Midrash (study hall) was dedicated as a living memorial to the late Rabbi Israel Miller, formerly of the Bronx, as part of the Second Yeshiva University Colloquium in Israel. Rabbi Israel Miller guided the founding of YU’s Israel Campus in Bayit Vegan, Jerusalem, and established the Gruss Institute for advanced rabbinical study. He devoted 60 years of his life to YU first as a student and then as an administrator.

“Many of us were fortunate to have the opportunity and privilege to work alongside the late Rabbi Israel Miller, or spend our student years at YU with him as a guide, mentor and vast resource of Jewish life and experience,” said Yeshiva University President Richard M. Joel.

“We therefore dedicated our Beit Midrash in Israel, the room in which our students learn, share, and teach in Rabbi Miller’s memory. This room is the heart of our Gruss Institute in Jerusalem that was created, in good part, due to Rabbi Miller’s vision and determination, and was a place from which he derived personal inspiration for many years.”

The beit midrash, to be known as the Rabbi Israel Miller Beit Midrash/Beit Midrash Heichel Azriel, is at the center of the YU Israel campus. Rabbi Miller visited and studied there during each of his many trips to Israel.

The beit midrash is used by hundreds of people every day – students in the YU Israel Kollel, rabbis, scholars, and laymen from throughout Israel and abroad – under the direction of Rabbi Dovid Miller, associate director of the Gruss Institute and eldest son of Rabbi Miller. The rosh kollel’s office is dedicated in memory of Rabbi Miller’s wife, Ruth.

More than 300 friends and colleagues participated in the dedication and the Yeshiva College Alumni Association contributed $50,000 toward the Beit Midrash library.

Rabbi Miller’s four children, each prominent in their respective spheres, spoke at the dedication. Besides Rabbi Dovid Miller, they are: Rabbi Michael Miller, executive vice-president of the Jewish Community Relations Council in New York City; Deb Kram, director of adult learning at the Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater Boston and the founding program director of the award-winning Boston beit midrash initiative, Ma’ayan; and Judy Kalish, who works at The Hebrew University in public relations.

Dr. Norman Lamm, YU chancellor and former president of YU, spoke of Rabbi Miller’s impact on the Jewish community at large. “Rabbi Miller’s communal leadership was well known. As a vibrant and prominent Orthodox rabbi, he functioned in the broader Jewish community, not only for the benefit of Orthodox Jews, but for klal Yisrael (the Jewish community).

“He brought the message of Torah to all Jews not by preaching but by practicing. He acted out of genuine ahavat Yisrael (love of the Jewish people), and his love embraced every Jew. Rabbi Miller, our role model as a Jewish leader, became our elder statesman and one of our most eminent –and sweetest and most beloved–alumni.”

Yeshiva University has a long history of commitment to the State of Israel. Over 80 percent of undergraduates have spent a year in Israel and each year, many YU students spend their winter break volunteering in the country.

In addition, over 3,600 YU alumni have made aliya. Many alumni have served in the IDF, including some who have made the ultimate sacrifice. As YU students engage in Torah study in Jerusalem and thousands of alumni live their lives in Israel, Rabbi Miller’s aspirations are brought to life, and his vision is perpetuated.

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President Richard M. Joel (far left) with the children of the late Rabbi Israel Miller (L-R): Judy Kalish, Deborah Kram, Rabbi Michael Miller, and Rabbi Dovid Miller.

Mar 14, 2008 — In an interview with Time magazine, Rabbi Israel Miller, senior vice president of Yeshiva University who devoted his life to the Jewish people and the State of Israel, was asked about the dual loyalty of the Jewish community in America. “Is Judaism a noun or an adjective? Are you American Jews or Jewish Americans?” came the question. Rabbi Miller responded: “Judaism is neither a noun nor an adjective. Judaism is a verb. A Jew acts, a Jew behaves, a Jew thinks, a Jew speaks, all in consonance with the will of God, in consonance with his mitzvot [commandments].”

“That was my father,” said Rabbi Dovid Miller, eldest son of Rabbi Miller, in whose name the beit midrash [study hall] at the YU in Israel Campus was dedicated on Friday, March 14. “He was a verb—full of energy, passionate, eloquent, a deep thinker, and a very persuasive leader.”

Rabbi Miller, who guided and nurtured the founding of YU’s campus in Bayit Vegan, Jerusalem, devoted 60 years of his life to YU first as a student and then as an administrator. The beit midrash, to be known as the Rabbi Israel Miller Beit Midrash/Beit Midrash Heichel Azriel, is at the heart of the Israel campus. Rabbi Miller visited and studied there during each of his many trips to Israel.

“I wanted, as a personal privilege, to be partners with the family in making sure that Rabbi Dr. Israel Miller would not only be remembered but would be part of the vitality of Yeshiva University forever,” said President Richard M. Joel, who spoke at the dedication, which was attended by family, friends, and admirers of the late Rabbi Miller. “This makom [place] bears his name because it bears the fruits of his life’s work.”

The beit midrash is used by hundreds of people every day—students in the YU in Israel Kollel, rabbis, scholars, and laymen from throughout Israel and abroad—under the direction of Rabbi Dovid Miller, associate director of the Gruss Institute at the YU in Israel Campus.

Rabbi Miller, together with his siblings Rabbi Michael Miller, Deborah Kram, and Judy Kalish, spoke at the dedication ceremony about their father and about how beloved and respected he was by his students, his congregants, and the world leaders he met through his work in Jewish communal and organizational life. He and his siblings also dedicated the Office of the Rosh Kollel at the Gruss Institute in memory of their mother, Ruth.

In addition to President Joel and the Miller children, speakers at the dedication included Rabbi Zevulun Charlop, the Max and Marion Grill Dean at RIETS, and Rabbi Yona Reiss, RIETS dean-elect. Other family members at the dedication included Rabbi Israel Miller’s brother, Rabbi David Miller. The event began with shacharit [morning prayer service] and a shiur [lecture] by Rabbi Dovid Miller.

The dedication ceremony is one of four events comprising the Second Yeshiva University Colloquium in Israel. An academic convocation, held Wednesday, March 12, kicked off the series of events, followed on Thursday, March 13, by a conversation between President Joel and Rabbi Dr. Aharon Lichtenstein, the Rabbi Henoch and Sarah D. Berman Professor of Talmud and rosh kollel and director of the RIETS Israel Kollel in Jerusalem. Titled “Contemplating Torah Umadda: Bedieved or Lechatchila,” it was held at the Jerusalem Great Synagogue.

The colloquium concluded with an alumni Shabbaton hosted by President Joel and Morry J. Weiss, chairman of the YU Board of Trustees.

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Construction of the beit midrash at Stern College took place over the summer.

Aug 21, 2007 — After a summer of hammering and drilling, building, painting, and carpeting, Yeshiva University’s undergraduate and graduate campuses now boast many new high-quality facilities. The Office of Planning, Design and Construction oversaw the renovation and construction of about 40 projects, some of which will continue into the fall semester, said Jeffrey Rosengarten, vice president for administrative services.

To see a gallery of photos of the new facilities, click here.

“The lion’s share of what we’re doing at the moment will benefit academics and student life,” Mr. Rosengarten said. “It is a major step toward the modernization of all our campuses.”

245 Lexington Avenue
The Lea and Leon Eisenberg Beit Midrash at Stern College for Women opens this semester on the seventh floor of 245 Lexington Avenue. The new, glass-enclosed room will seat up to 120 people and is three times larger than the previous beit midrash (study hall). It features a uniquely designed aron kodesh (holy ark) and many elegant architectural touches, and will be dedicated at an event in October.

The front entrance way and first floor of 245 Lexington Avenue have been completely revamped. An elegant glass and steel façade rising from ground level to the third floor includes a covered portico where students can gather. Inside, the expanded lobby gives students and visitors more space to congregate. The space formerly occupied by the dean’s offices to the right of the lobby has been converted into two large adjoining classrooms, which also function as flexible meeting rooms that can be joined into one large space. The transparent glass walls looking onto the lobby can be electronically adjusted to become opaque when the rooms are being used for classes.

Classroom Modernizations

Multimedia systems have been installed in about 25 classrooms at the Beren Campus, matching work that was recently completed at the Wilf Campus, so that virtually every undergraduate classroom now has audio-visual capabilities.

New Dormitory at Stern
A new building has been added to the Beren Campus, reinforcing Stern College’s presence as a major educational institution in midtown Manhattan. About 130 students can be housed at the modern and luxurious dormitory at 150 East 35th Street. The facility features lounges and exercise facilities, and each unit includes a beautiful kitchen with marble countertops.

Belfer Hall
A little-known space in Belfer Hall, the concourse below the basement now hosts an extensive suite of state-of-the-art laboratories for psychology, physics, and computer research at Yeshiva College. The psychology department’s area includes an observation and subject lab with a one-way mirror, as well as a comfortable lounge and pantry for students’ and faculty use. The floor also features modern physics labs with a group work area, a suite of four advanced computer research labs with a dedicated server room, and two large computer teaching labs.

Additionally, large biochemistry and microbiology labs, a dedicated student research facility, and a biology prep room on the 14th floor were scheduled for completion by the end of August.

Furst Hall
A welcoming new Office of Admissions will greet prospective and current students and their families on the first floor of Furst Hall this semster. The suite will include the office of Hillel Davis, PhD, vice president for university life.

Underutilized areas in the Furst Hall lower level, previously a practice area for the fencing team, were renovated into about 40 work spaces to meet the growing need for staff offices. Fencing practice will now take place in Zysman Hall.

Other staff offices in Furst Hall have been revamped including Communications and Public Affairs on the fourth floor and the Chancellor’s suite on the fifth floor. The Office of Institutional Advancement, which has grown rapidly over the past two years, will also occupy part of that floor when work is completed in the fall.

Glueck Center
Construction has begun on the Jacob and Dreizel Glueck Center for Jewish Study, the first building to be constructed on the Wilf Campus in over 20 years. Over the summer, the site was excavated and the foundation laid. Structural work will begin in the fall and the building is slated for completion in 2008. The center will house a two-story, 470-seat beit midrash—the largest at YU—two large lecture halls, 50 faculty offices, nine classrooms, and facilities for seminars and classrooms.

Gottesman Library
Scheduled for completion by year’s end, the former space occupied by the YU Museum on the library’s first floor will be converted into a multi-functional event space. Primarily a student lounge, it will also serve as an auditorium accommodating close to 400 people, and an elegant banquet/dining facility for special events. A series of split levels will define the different areas and allow for flexible use.

A new entrance to the library, the Nagel Family Atrium, will be built on West 185th Street. Constructed of glass, it will complement the older brick structure of the library and echo the modern façade of the adjoining Glueck Center when it is finished.

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Jun 14, 2007 — Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future will sponsor the Teaneck Beit Midrash Summer Program for Women, the first program of its kind at Yeshiva University designed to provide women of all ages with the knowledge and tools to become both Judaic scholars and role models for the Orthodox community. The program will take place at Maayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls from July 2-26.

The Teaneck Beit Midrash Summer Program is administered by fellows of Yeshiva University’s Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies (GPATS), which advances a higher level of education for women in traditional communities, creates a movement of women’s learning, and shares their scholarship with the Jewish community.

“This is an outgrowth of our commitment to women’s leadership and Jewish education,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, dean of CJF. “This unique venture follows on the heels of Midreshet Yom Rishon–our Sunday learning program for women on the YU campus–the GPATS program, and numerous leadership fellowships for women. This is just the beginning.”

The Teaneck Beit Midrash will offer a multi-faceted agenda tailored to different segments of the community. The Youth Program has four components: chavruta [partner-style] learning for elementary, middle school, and high school girls; Mishnah Madness for girls in grades 5-8; and the Mitzvah of the Week Workshop and Pizza and Parsha, both for girls from grades 1-8.

“I am excited to be a part of this unique initiative,” said Malka Adatto, coordinator of the program. “The Teaneck Beit Midrash is the type of opportunity I yearned for in elementary school and high school. We have put together a program that fosters relationships with girls who will continue on a path of learning and leadership.”

The faculty for the community program will be Rebbetzin Smadar Rosensweig, a Stern College faculty member, who will discuss the “Haftarot of Calamity and Consolation” on Thursdays. Elana Stein Hain, a graduate of the GPATS program and currently the William Fischman Resident Scholar at The Jewish Center in Manhattan, will lecture on “Legal Loopholes: Case Studies in Halakhha” on Mondays and Wednesdays.

Rabbi Brander will give a shiur on Monday, July 16 at 2:30 pm and Rabbi Moshe Kahn will present a course on the halakhic basis of abiding by secular laws of government beginning on July 2. Rabbi Kahn is on the faculty of Stern College and GPATS, and is a member in-training at the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis.

The third pillar is the Beit Midrash Fellows Program given Monday through Thursday, which features “Analysis of the Sheva Mitzvot Bnei Noach” with Rabbi Shmuel Hain, rosh beit midrash of the learning program at GPATS. Rachel Friedman, who has served as a scholar-in-residence at synagogues and educational institutions across the US, will provide an in-depth analysis of the Book of Yechezkel (Ezekiel). She has an MA in Bible from YU’s Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies and a JD from Columbia University School of Law.

For more information on YU Summer Programs, please e-mail CJFSummer@yu.edu.

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