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YU High School for Boys Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Great Debate Tournament

When Harriet Levitt began teaching English at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB) / The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy in 1982, she saw a tremendous opportunity to enrich her students’ education through a competitive sport that had long been her passion: debate. “The degree of intellectuality that exists at the high school was amazing to me,” she said. “Our students argue gemara back and forth every morning. I realized the activity of debate would push that even further.”

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Harriet Levitt, along with her husband, Dan, formed the Yeshiva Debate League in 1988.

Having loved her own experience as a high school and college debater, Levitt wanted YUHSB students to be able to participate in the National Forensic League. But there was a problem—the League’s debates all took place on Saturdays. Read the rest of this entry…

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Dec 15, 2009 — Yeshiva University (www.yu.edu) announced today that 20 outstanding tenth graders from the Yeshiva University high schools – 10 from the Yeshiva University High School for Boys/Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (YUHSB) and 10 from the Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls (YUHSG) – will be participating in a unique six-week student exchange program with Israeli high schools. Now in its second year, the program aims to immerse the American students in Israeli culture and help them connect with their Israeli counterparts.

The YUHSG students, who arrived in Israel on December 6, have already joined their peers at Ulpanat Tzvia in Ma’aleh Adumim, while the YUHSB students will begin classes at Yeshivat Mekor Haim in Kibbutz Kfar Etzion upon their December 17 arrival.

“What’s unique about this program is that the students are fully-integrated into the Israeli classrooms,” said Tova Rosenberg, coordinator of the exchange program and Director of Hebrew Language Studies at both Yeshiva University high schools. “The students sit in on all Judaic studies classes, are included in all school activities, and are housed in the same dormitories as the Israeli students. They are not treated as guests, but as members of the student body.”

The Yeshiva University high school students will also take part in a series of field trips intended to show them Israel’s out-of-the-way treasures – “not the usual tourist spots” – and will enjoy special Shabbat programs at the Yeshiva University Gruss Kollel in Bayit Ve’Gan arranged by the Kollel families themselves.

Later this year, six Yeshivat Mekor Haim students and four Ulpanat Tzvia students will travel to New York to study at the Yeshiva University high schools for a six-week period. In addition to attending classes, the Israeli students will tour New York City and Philadelphia to learn about American history and culture, and will experience life in U.S. Jewish communities.

“By sending our students to Israel and bringing the Israeli students to our schools, we are opening the eyes of every student involved in the program to the reality of the ‘Global Jewish Community.’ As our future Jewish leaders, it is vital that they understand and are accepting of other cultures,” added Rosenberg.

“The culture of deep spiritual purpose and constant reflection that is the hallmark of the Mekor Haim experience has exposed our students to serious religious and intellectual growth in ways unimagined for the typical tenth grader,” said Rabbi Mark Gottlieb, head of school at YUHSB. “Additionally, the visiting Mekor Haim students inject a sense of passion, urgency and authenticity into the rhythm of school life here. Armed with a newfound understanding of the American Jewish scene, these exceptional students have the potential to become the next generation of shlichim (emissaries to Israel).”

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Elie Klein
Ruder Finn Israel for Yeshiva University
Cell: + 972-54-467-6967
Office: + 972-2-589-2013
Email: elie@ruderfinn.co.il

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Jul 26, 2010 — Chaya Batya (C.B.) Neugroschl, an educator with nearly 20 years of pedagogic, curricular and administrative experience in both Limudei Kodesh and general studies, has been named head of school of the Yeshiva University High School for Girls (Central). The appointment is the culmination of a search that involved parents, faculty, board members and YU administrators, spanning both the United States and Israel.

Prior to joining YUHSG, Neugroschl has served as assistant principal and co-director of general studies at SAR High School since 2004, where she has introduced innovative curricular initiatives and special programming. Before coming to SAR, Neugroschl was the director of admissions at Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls, where she taught Jewish history and philosophy.

Neugroschl’s educational background is impressive. She studied for two years at Michlala in Bayit V’gan before earning her BA at Stern College for Women in 1993. She continued her studies at Bernard Revel Graduate School, and then at Harvard University, where she received her MA in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 1998.

“Mrs. Neugroschl brings to our school a very well developed and integrated educational vision,” noted Miriam Goldberg, chair of Yeshiva University High Schools Board of Trustees. “She has earned a well deserved reputation for working collaboratively with faculty and parents. Mrs. Neugroschl brings an established and accomplished track record of creating dynamic environments for learning, true intellectual exchange, coupled with setting standards for high levels of student growth.”

To learn more about Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls visit www.yuhsg.org.

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Apr 28, 2010 — Inspired by the story of Ruth, some 200 young women assembled at Stern College for Women for an evening of Jewish scholarship and siyum [completion] presented by the Torah Leadership Network (TLN), a program coordinated by the Center for the Jewish Future (CJF). Representing high schools from across the tri-state area, the students divided into four chaburot [groups] to study and complete the entire Megillat Rut [Book of Ruth]. The evening also featured a lecture by Deena Rabinovich, an instructor in Bible at Stern and director of Stern’s Jewish Educators Project.

“We wanted to do something special to mark the end of a year spent creating a community of Torah learning among the high school students and madrichot [advisors],” explained Sarah Emerson Helfand, director of women’s programming for the CJF. “By studying the story of Ruth—the epitome of strong Jewish female leadership—we were able to convey to our own undergraduates and the high school students, our firm commitment to teaching and developing strong Jewish women leaders.”

Participating schools included Yeshiva University High School for Girls (Central), SKA, Maayanot, Bruriah, Shalhevet, Yeshiva of Flatbush, HANC, Shulamith and Hillel.

“I had a wonderful time seeing my friends from other schools,” said Devora Eisenberg, a sophomore at Shalhevet. “The food was great and the learning was awesome.”

The program was organized and led by 40 undergraduate madrichot from Stern and women in the graduate-level Tanach Learning Program, who trained the madrichot and provided them with detailed source sheets.

“As an alumna of Stern, it was both inspiring and heartwarming to witness the love of learning displayed by today’s generation of Stern students and wonderful madrichot,” said Mindy Sussman, a school administrator at Shalhevet. “I was equally impressed by the caliber of the Stern Torah studies faculty.”

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Apr 28, 2010 — Yeshiva University High Schools (YUHS) will hold their Annual Dinner of Tribute on Sunday, May 16, 2010 at New York City’s Grand Hyatt. Zev and Judy (Hecht) Berman will be the guests of honor. Special tribute will be paid to their parents, Rabbi Julius and Mrs. Dorothy Berman and Rabbi Michael and Mrs. Sara Hecht. Mrs. Vera Glatt will be awarded Faculty Member of the Year and Rabbi Elie Weissman will receive the Young Leader of the Year award.

Judy Berman is a graduate of YUHSG (Central), Stern College for Women and NYU Law School. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of YUHS and has served as the chair of the Parents Council of YUHSG for the past four years and held the same position at YUHSB (MTA) for four years. Zev Berman, a Yeshiva College graduate, is a founding member of the Board of Directors of Yeshiva College and serves on its executive committee. They reside in Jamaica Estates and are proud parents of four children – all former, current and future YUHS students.

Their parents have longstanding relationships with YU.

Rabbi Berman currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Yeshiva University’s affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) and as a member of the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee of YU. He also serves as the Chairman of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany, Inc. and as an honorary president of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Mrs. Berman, a Stern College and Ferkauf Graduate School alumna, currently serves as a vice chair of the Board of Overseers of Stern College.

Rabbi Hecht, a former dean and graduate of YUHSB, currently serves as its Maggid Shiur. A graduate of Yeshiva College and Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, he received semikhah from RIETS. He taught at YUHSB and Yeshiva College for almost 30 years and served formally in the role of dean of Yeshiva College and as YU’s pre-law advisor. Mrs. Hecht spent many years working at the registrar’s office at YU’s Cardozo Law School.

Mrs. Glatt is completing her 36th year as a teacher of English, ranging from junior high through college, the last 10 of which have been spent at her alma mater, YUHSG. She lives in Hillcrest with her husband, Jay.

Rabbi Weissman has been teaching Torah and Tanach at YUHSG since 2006. He received his rabbinic ordination from RIETS. Since 2005, Rabbi Weissman has served as Rabbi of Young Israel of Plainview, where he lives with his wife, Avital.

For reservations, to place an ad in the journal or for more information about the dinner please contact 212-960-5366 or email yuhsdinner@yu.edu.

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Mar 11, 2009 — The 18th annual Red Sarachek Basketball Tournament is coming to Yeshiva University from March 26-30. The event, considered the most prestigious Jewish high school basketball tournament in North America, will feature 20 teams from across the United States and Canada. Games will be held at YU’s Max Stern Athletic Center, located on its Wilf Campus in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan, as well as at Torah Academy of Bergen County and the Frisch School. Games will be broadcast live by YU students at www.macslive.com.

“The Sarachek tournament gives yeshiva high school players an opportunity to dream of playing in the big leagues,” said Michael Kranzler, YU director of undergraduate admissions. “It also provides high school students from diverse backgrounds with the opportunity to meet and compete with their counterparts.”

The Yeshiva University High School for Boys/Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy will host the tournament and players will spend Shabbat together off-campus with YU administrators.

Bernard “Red” Sarachek became the fifth head men’s basketball coach at Yeshiva University in 1942, and during the 1942-43 season, he led YU to a 10-5 record. After taking a hiatus from Yeshiva during the 1943-45 seasons, Sarachek returned to the Yeshiva sideline for the 1945-46 season, and remained there for 24 seasons, winning a total of 202 games. During his historic tenure as head coach at Yeshiva, Sarachek became renowned as one of the greatest basketball minds in the country, developing strategies and techniques used by college and professional coaches today.

The Red Sarachek Tournament was established in 1992 as a way to honor Sarachek’s accomplishments and contributions to the sport and the Jewish community. Since the inception of the tournament, nine different schools have been crowned champions. Last year, Ida Crown Jewish Academy (Chicago, IL) defeated Hebrew Academy of Nassau County (Uniondale, NY) to win the 2008 championship.

For more information, please visit www.yu.edu/sarachek.

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Feb 23, 2009 — Four students at The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy /Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB) were named finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Program after performing extremely well on their Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Tests (PSAT/NMSQT). Three of the academically talented seniors are New Jersey natives Yosef Kornbluth and Moshe Shulman of Teaneck and Eli Putterman, of Bergenfield.

“These are some of the most gifted students to ever come through the school,” said Dr. Edward Berliner, professor of physics at YU, who teaches calculus and AP physics at YUHSB and directs the new Honors College for gifted students. “They all worked extraordinarily hard and I was extremely fortunate to have had all four as my students.”

The National Merit Scholarship Program is an academic competition for recognition and scholarships that began in 1955. Awards are given annually to students with the highest PSAT/ NMSQT selection index scores (critical reading, mathematics, and writing skills scores) qualifying them for recognition in the National Merit Scholarship Program. Of the approximately 1.5 million entrants from over 21,000 high schools, about 15,000 or less than 1 percent advance to finalists standing.

To become a finalist, students must have an outstanding academic record throughout high school, be endorsed by their principal, and earn SAT scores that confirm the students’ earlier performance on the qualifying test. The finalists continue in the running for the opportunity to compete for some 8,200 National Merit Scholarships worth more than $35 million, which will be offered next spring.

“I was very excited when I found out I was named a finalist,” said Shulman, who aspires to join the YU honors program and pursue a degree in math or science. “It is truly a great honor to receive this award.”

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Representing Yeshiva University High School for Boys as finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Program are, from left, Aaron Yevick, Yosef Kornbluth, Moshe Shulman and Eli Putterman.

Feb 18, 2009 — Four students at The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy/Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB) were named finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Program after performing extremely well on their Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Tests (PSAT/NMSQT). They were: New Jersey natives Yosef Kornbluth and Moshe Shulman, of Teaneck and Eli Putterman, of Bergenfield, and Toronto native Aaron Yevick.

“These are some of the most gifted students to ever come through the school,” said Dr. Edward Berliner, clinical professor of physics at YU, who teaches calculus and AP physics at YUHSB and directs the new Honors College for gifted students. “They all worked extraordinarily hard to be among the very best students in the country. I was extremely fortunate to have had all four as my students.”

The National Merit Scholarship Program is an academic competition for recognition and scholarships that began in 1955. Awards are given annually to students with the highest PSAT/ NMSQT selection index scores (critical reading, mathematics, and writing skills scores) qualifying them for recognition in the National Merit Scholarship Program. Of the approximately 1.5 million entrants from over 21,000 high schools, about 15,000 or less than 1 percent advance to finalists standing.

To become a finalist, students must have an outstanding academic record throughout high school, be endorsed by their principal, and earn SAT scores that confirm the students’ earlier performance on the qualifying test. The finalists continue in the running for the opportunity to compete for some 8,200 National Merit Scholarships worth more than $35 million, which will be offered next spring.

“When I found out I was named a finalist, I felt a great sense of accomplishment,” said Yevick, who praised his school and teachers. “YUHSB has always helped me pursue my academic goals. My teachers, particularly Dr. Berliner, have always given me the opportunity and the motivation I needed to excel.”

“I was very excited when I found out I was named a finalist,” said Shulman, who aspires to pursue a degree in math or science and join the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program at Yeshiva College. “It is truly a great honor to receive this award.”

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Feb 4, 2009 — Hundreds of high school students from across North America will gather at the Sheraton Hotel in Stamford, Connecticut to debate the world’s fate at the 19th annual Yeshiva University National Model United Nations (YUNMUN) conference. The event will take place on February 8 – 10 and is expected to draw about 450 students representing 42 high schools from both the United States and Canada.

“We hope to give the students the opportunity to participate in an intellectual conference, learn the processes of the United Nations and diplomacy, and provide a forum to discuss issues facing the global community,” said Yehudis Isenberg, the event organizer.

Playing the roles of real United Nations delegates, students will represent a variety of views, including those with which they may not traditionally agree with. They research their country’s position, adding both to their knowledge of world affairs and to their appreciation of the importance of preparation and critical evaluation.

During simulated meetings of the UN, the students will debate topics such as world health, disarmament, and trade and development. Each school will represent at least one UN-member country and students will be assigned to one of 15 committees, including the International Court of Justice, the World Health Organization, and the Middle East Summit. Beyond learning about politics, public speaking, and negotiation, students will meet and work with peers from other high schools.

The conference will also include guest speakers, Yeshiva University President Richard M. Joel, and Tom Martinez, a noted speaker and human rights activist. Martinez, a former member of the KKK, will talk about his experiences and how hatred, racism and bigotry are not only extremely prevalent in today’s day and age, but provide a major impetus toward achieving of world peace.

YUNMUN Secretary General, Ilana Snyder, a Stern College for Women senior, will participate in her eighth YUNMUN conference. “In my senior year on Model UN, our topic was Darfur, and, as the delegate from Rwanda, which had seen such atrocities, I learned to care,” said Snyder, who subsequently chose to pursue a career in human rights law.

“It is my hope that the students will garner this passion for a specific topic. The most important thing is that each individual student connects to any issue they strongly care about.”

For more information on YUNMUN, visit the conference’s Web site at www.yu.edu/yunmun.

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Nov 13, 2008 — This fall, Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB)/ The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy inaugurated its Honors College, a forum for enriched spiritual and intellectual stimulation geared to engage gifted students. Twenty-four students were recruited from the top echelons of their elementary school classes for the incoming class of the Honors College. The program reflects a synergy of Torah principles with the broader intellectual world.

Edward Berliner, director of the Honors College, said the program will establish an “intellectual hothouse for participating students.”

“We spend a lot of time at yeshiva high schools with students who need extra attention but the question is how much time are we spending with students who need and deserve special attention to further their intellectual growth?” Dr. Berliner said.

After eight months of planning, the program was developed with four academic features in mind: investment in academic excellence, interdisciplinary studies, experiential learning and directed mentoring.

Throughout their four years in the program, students will have additional thematic readings and will read perspectives of various authors ranging from Mark Twain to Rabbi Joseph B. Soleveitchik. They will also go on field trips, which will include preparatory research and debriefing. They have studied both the biology and politics that play a role in the preservation of the Meadowlands wetlands in preparation for a scheduled pontoon boat tour of the wetlands in New Jersey.

Meir Hirsch, a freshman from Teaneck, NJ, said he joined the Honors College in the hope of a deeper challenge in both secular and Judaic studies. “I saw the opportunity as a chance to gain knowledge and skills from sources that are not available to all the high school students, such as advanced fieldtrips and speakers,” Hirsch said.

Dr. Berliner and his colleagues were pleased with student participation at the program’s opening event, a seminar discussion on the boys’ summer reading assignment, ‘Huckleberry Finn,’ led by Dr. Fred Sugarman, associate dean of Yeshiva College.

“Students made comments that were so profound,” Dr. Berliner said. “These kids want to be challenged and it is our job to live up to that.”

To learn more about the Honors College or YUHSB contact Shuey Jacoby, director of admissions at sjacoby@yuhsb.org or call 212-960-5400, ext. 6676.

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