Yeshiva University News » Jewish

Sep 20, 2010 — Inspired by the holiday of Sukkot and the creation of Sukkah City, the Yeshiva University Museum will host a panel discussion on Monday, Sept. 27 at 6 pm entitled “Judaism and Sacred Space: Meditations on Sukkah City.” The program brings together a multidisciplinary panel of scholars and academics to discuss the nature of sacred space in Jewish thought, narrative and law in a highly interactive mode.

Sukkah City is an international design competition aimed at reimagining the Sukkah, developing new methods of material practice and parametric design, and proposing radical possibilities for traditional design constraints in a contemporary urban site. Twelve finalists were selected by a panel of celebrated architects, designers and critics to be on display in a visionary village in Union Square Park from September 19-20, 2010.

Two of the winning designs from Sukkah City will be on display at Yeshiva University Museum in The Center for Jewish History for viewing before and after the program—and throughout the holiday of Sukkot.

The panelist will explore how the conception of space in multiple areas of Jewish practice and ideals reflect: the private and public spheres; notions of home and civilization; and the encounter between the human and the divine.

Panel Participants include Dr. Jill Katz, adjunct professor of anthropology and archaeology at Yeshiva University; Dr. Jacob J. Schacter, YU Professor of Jewish history and Jewish thought, and Senior Scholar at the YU’s Center for the Jewish Future; and Dr. Lawrence H. Schiffman, Ethel and Irvin A. Edelman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, Chair of Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University. The panel will be moderated by Rabbi Yehuda Sarna, rabbi of The Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life and university chaplain at New York University.

Yeshiva University Museum is located at The Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York City. The program is free to the public and organized and co-sponsored by Yeshiva University Museum and the Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life at NYU.

The program is free to the public and organized and co-sponsored by Yeshiva University Museum, the Center for the Jewish Future and the Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life at NYU.

Comments

Sep 14, 2009 — In the two weeks since the Jacob and Dreizel Glueck Center for Jewish Study opened on the Wilf Campus, its walls have vibrated with the hum of students learning in its two-storey beit midrash [study hall]. That “harmonic symphony of Torah study,” to use President Richard M. Joel’s words, erupted into a rousing chorus of celebration as students and their rebbes, alumni and staff danced in the streets at the dedication of the new building on Sunday, Sept. 13.

“Today we celebrate a new chapter in the history of Yeshiva University and the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS),” said President Joel. “The Glueck Center has already revolutionized this campus, adding a proud new space for scholarship and learning that is both timeless and timely, and a convening center for our thriving community.”

Read more about the building here.

See a photo gallery from the event here

“RIETS was the first yeshiva to wave the flag of Yavneh on American soil,” he said. “From an inaugural class of only a dozen students meeting in a small room on the Lower East Side, RIETS can now proudly boast of this wonderful state-of-the-art beit midrash, which serves as just one of many under its auspices.”

Vivian Glueck Rosenberg, the daughter of donor Jacob Glueck, said that her parents’ survival of the Holocaust motivated them to devote themselves to supporting Jewish community institutions. Rosenberg, together with her husband, Henry, was instrumental in realizing her father’s vision for a new beit midrash at YU that began under the administration of Dr. Norman Lamm in 1997.

“My parents believed in the primacy of education,” said Rosenberg, a member of the Boards of YU and Stern College for Women. “Our dedication of this building to YU is a statement of our belief in the importance of limud haTorah [the study of Torah] and the need for the vast majority of our youth to have the opportunity to earn a parnasa [a living].”

Addressing the students in the crowd, she said, “We pray you use to the fullest the opportunity put in front of you and thus assure the continuity of our people and our traditions.”

Special guests at the dedication included Sheldon Silver ’65YC, Speaker of the NY State Assembly and recipient of an honorary degree from YU, and NY State Representative Herman “Denny” Farrell, Jr.

Silver, who President Joel welcomed as “a ben Torah [son of Torah],” wished his alma mater congratulations. “I am proud to see YU expand in its size and prestige,” said Silver, whose three children are also alumni. “As it grows, YU invigorates the city and the state and especially this Washington Heights community.”

President Joel paid tribute to the many supporters whose gifts made the building possible, including the Nagel family, after whom the Jack and Gitta Nagel Family Atrium and Student Commons in the adjoining Mendel Gottesman Library is named.

The new stone and glass structure, he said, is a “tangible symbol of our absolute optimism in the future of our yeshiva and our University.”

“We must fill this space with the best of our community,” added President Joel. “A YU education must be both aspirational and non-negotiable. This is where our children will learn and grow into proud leaders of a proud and purposeful people of our nation.”

Comments

Sep 8, 2009 — Our sages teach that “the very world rests on the breath of children in the schoolhouse.”
Yet, without the finest quality teachers providing the “oxygen” – knowledge, skills, love of learning – that world rests on a shaky foundation.

To help ensure a solid and secure foundation, the San Francisco-based Jim Joseph Foundation has awarded Yeshiva University an initial $4 million grant to produce a significantly larger cadre of the best trained Jewish educators to work with Jewish youth and young adults. The grant, to be administered over the next five years, will develop The Jim Joseph Foundation Jewish Educator Continuum at YU, a university-wide initiative to create and nurture exceptional new Jewish educators. With both this and future grants from JJF, Yeshiva will identify myriad entry points to dramatically expand its capacity to train the very best young people for careers in both formal and informal Jewish education.

JJF’s commitment to further increase the number of future educators and to improve the quality of professional preparation and Jewish education they receive extends beyond YU’s walls. In a bold move, it has made similar multimillion dollar grants to The Jewish Theological Seminary and Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Indeed, the grants represent a $12 million initial investment JJF is making in these three institutions to propel forward the common purpose of advancing Jewish life through Jewish education.

Initially, the grants will be used by each school as financial aid for students pursuing education degrees or certification in programs of both formal and experiential Jewish education, and to assist each institution in planning new and enhanced programs that, with JJF support, will attract more educators to the field.

The grants will provide $700,000 to each institution for each of the next five academic years for such scholarships. The remaining grant funds will be divided among the institutions – $563,000 for YU, $221,900 for JTS, and $212,110 for HUC – to be used in the 2009/2010 academic year for planning purposes and innovative programs that will both seed and sustain the field.

“The Jim Joseph Foundation is confident these three institutions will produce highly qualified educators who will inspire a next generation of young Jews to value Jewish learning,” said Executive Director Chip Edelsberg. “The promise of this initiative is that it will enrich students in their respective programs of study, strengthen each individual institution, and enable us to infuse the field with talented educators whose collective good work will positively impact the world of Jewish education.”

To leverage its investment and to facilitate increased cooperation, JJF will convene a steering committee comprised of the leadership of the three institutions. This group will monitor progress of the grant implementation and plan for additional initiatives that will be pursued with JJF’s support. Together, the institutions will work to foster best practices and identify areas of potential collaboration, the first of which will be the analysis and implementation of distance learning technology at each school.

YU President Richard M. Joel sees JJF’s investment as a rising tide that will lift the capacity of the entire Jewish community. “The future of Jewish life depends on a Jewish people who know and own their story,” he remarked. “The Jim Joseph Foundation’s extraordinary ongoing investment ensures that the best and the brightest are equipped to educate our children and to advance Jewish life. More than that, these four institutions can become a powerful advocacy voice to remind and encourage the Jewish community of the centrality of Jewish knowledge to Jewish life, and the essential nature of quality Jewish education to the advancement of the Jewish people.”

Yeshiva will apply the JJF grant to both its graduate and undergraduate schools. The Center for the Jewish Future’s Eimatai Leadership Development Project and tuition scholarships for students in the Stern College for Women Jewish Educators Project will create both formal and informal entry points into Jewish education for Yeshiva University’s undergraduates. Additionally, the Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration will utilize funds to expand scholarship support, launch distance learning courses, and offer, for the first time, a certificate program in experiential Jewish Education. The grant will also assist in awarding stipends and scholarships to students enrolling in the new Master of Arts in Biblical and Talmudic Interpretation at Stern College for Women.

Reflecting YU’s desire to both seed and sustain the field, Azrieli’s Institute for University-School Partnership is also exploring mechanisms to launch and expand both continuing education and new teacher induction.

“To create more, better trained Jewish educators, mentoring, guidance and learning cannot end at graduation,” commented Dr. Scott Goldberg, Director of the Institute. “We see the Institute’s role as maximizing both Yeshiva’s and Jim Joseph’s investment in our students by providing serious new teacher induction and vehicles for ongoing training so that teachers remain in the field and continue to grow.”

“Our commitment is to Jewish education, and the partnership now established with these three institutions through these grants should contribute greatly to advancing this cause,” said JJF President Al Levitt. “It is an exciting development for all who care about improving the quality of Jewish life. We’re simply playing our role in helping these institutions, and the educators they educate, reach their full potential and positively shape the lives of Jewish youth.”

Comments

Aug 26, 2009 –Four Yeshiva University graduate students, all advanced Torah scholars, traveled to Senegal this summer on a social justice mission sponsored by the American Jewish World Service (AJWS). Sion Setton and Noah Greenfield of Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) and Gilah Kletenik and Meira Levinson of the Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies (GPATS) at Stern College were part of a group of 25 students from across the spectrum of Jewish affiliation, all of whom—with the exception of the GPATS women—are studying to become rabbis.



See a photo gallery here.

The group visited impoverished Senegalese villages to both help and learn from the African villagers. Mornings were spent building latrines in the villages of Darou Mouride and Keur Songo, which will help fight the swift spread of disease; afternoons were devoted to meeting political officials, studying development in the world’s poorest countries and planning follow-up programs in students’ home communities.

“Most American Jews are shielded from this particular reality of the world,” said Rabbi Brent Spodek, director of Jewish communal relations at AJWS who led the mission. “I think it’s essential for Jews, especially students who will become community and spiritual leaders, to realize that God created everyone in this world and that many of those people live on less than $2 a day.”

Setton said the experience deepened his understanding of what Talmudic scholars have to say about wealth. “Witnessing how so many comfortable Americans can be dissatisfied with their lot and how Senegalese could live on so little and be so wealthy in much more important ways helped me understand our sages’ saying: ‘Who is rich? The one who is happy with his lot.’”

Kletenik, who co-led YU’s Social Justice Society last year, said she came away with a valuable lesson. “One thing that became clear from this trip is that despite our differences with Jews from other denominations, we can and, indeed, must unite in the areas on which we agree, like social justice,” she said.

Now that they are home, the four are planning to share their insights with the YU and wider communities. Kletenik and Levinson, who received sponsorship from YU’s Center for the Jewish Future to participate in the mission, will run an educational program for undergraduate students about social justice based on their experience in Senegal. Setton plans to incorporate what he learned in Senegal in future sermons and on other occasions as a communal leader, and Greenfield said he has been sensitized to broaden his advocacy to include worthy global causes.

Rabbi Spodek was impressed by the foursome’s unique contribution to the group. “Their strong educational background allowed them to use a framework of sources from Halacha and Midrash to make sense of the circumstances and suffering in Senegal. It takes a real sense of sophistication to use Jewish texts to explain what’s going on in Africa.”

Comments

The Beit Midrash will be led by RIETS graduate, Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner

Aug 18, 2009 — The Toronto Jewish community will be home to the Yeshiva University (YU) Torah Mitzion Beit Midrash (intensive Torah and Talmud study program) of Toronto beginning September, 2009. The Beit Midrash is an affiliate of YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) and Kollel Torah Mitzion. The mission of the Beit Midrash is to enrich and engage the greater Toronto Jewish community with inspired Torah living and learning. It will harness the resources of YU and its affiliates by deploying its scholars to service the local synagogues, day schools, youth movements, young couples, college students and the Federation community. While it will serve the entire Toronto Jewish community it will be located at the Clanton Park Synagogue, 11 Lowesmoor Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

“The Toronto Beit Midrash, a permanent cadre of Torah scholars who will reside in Toronto, will serve as a satellite of YU’s Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, (RIETS)” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner dean of CJF. “The multi-tiered program will tailor learning to the men, women and youth of the affiliated community, as well as reach out to the greater Jewish community.”

The Beit Midrash will be led by Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner, who was ordained at RIETS. He was the spiritual leader at Congregation Sons of Israel in Allentown, PA for eight years. Rabbi Torczyner excels in utilizing the Internet and social media outlets to spread Torah to people around the globe particularly with his WebShas online index to the Talmud. Rabbi Torczyner is also a member of the Rabbinical Council of America-Orthodox Union Joint Kashruth Commission, and the Rabbinical Council of America’s Task Force on Business Ethics.

Rabbi Azarya Berzon, a student of Rav Soloveitchik, was also ordained at RIETS will be a one year Beit Midrash Scholar-in-Residence. He taught in Israel for 13 years, served in the Israeli army for 14 years, and in 1991 established Yeshiva Sha’arei Mevasseret Zion where he served as Rosh Yeshiva (professor of Talmud) for 18 years.

“Toronto is already known for its commitment to Torah,” said Rabbi Torczyner. “We will add to that potent mix by disseminating Torah as well as presenting our unique emphasis on building bridges in the Jewish community, on supporting the State of Israel, and on engaging the broader society. We will serve communities across the religious spectrum including high school and college students.”

Under Rabbi Torczyner’s leadership, the Beit Midrash will foster an open, dynamic community of learning. “Even beginners with nominal Jewish education will be put on a trajectory to advance their Jewish learning and empower them to delve into the rich texts of our tradition,” added Rabbi Torczyner.

In addition to Rabbis Torczyner and Berzon the Beit Midrash will be comprised of four scholars who are dedicated to honing their skills as serious Jewish educators. A significant portion of their day will be dedicated to intensive analysis and research of the wisdom of Jewish tradition. Their interaction with the community will actualize and transmit their passion and knowledge to create a true community Beit Midrash.

Rabbi Brander further explained that “the Beit Midrash represents our continuing effort to shape and create experiences that will serve as incubators for Jewish leaders. They also represent a vibrant initiative to enable communities to experience the wealth of resources and presence of Yeshiva University right in their backyard.”

Comments

Aug 17, 2009 — The Toronto Jewish community will be home to the Yeshiva University (YU) Torah Mitzion Beit Midrash (intensive Torah and Talmud study program) of Toronto beginning September, 2009. The Beit Midrash is an affiliate of YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) and Kollel Torah Mitzion. The mission of the Beit Midrash is to enrich and engage the greater Toronto Jewish community with inspired Torah living and learning. It will harness the resources of YU and its affiliates by deploying its scholars to service the local synagogues, day schools, youth movements, young couples, college students and the Federation community. While it will serve the entire Toronto Jewish community it will be located at the Clanton Park Synagogue, 11 Lowesmoor Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

“The Toronto Beit Midrash, a permanent cadre of Torah scholars who will reside in Toronto, will serve as a satellite of YU’s Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, (RIETS)” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner dean of CJF. “The multi-tiered program will tailor learning to the men, women and youth of the affiliated community, as well as reach out to the greater Jewish community.”

The Beit Midrash will be led by Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner, who was ordained at RIETS. He was the spiritual leader at Congregation Sons of Israel in Allentown, PA for eight years. Rabbi Torczyner excels in utilizing the Internet and social media outlets to spread Torah to people around the globe particularly with his WebShas online index to the Talmud. Rabbi Torczyner is also a member of the Rabbinical Council of America-Orthodox Union Joint Kashruth Commission, and the Rabbinical Council of America’s Task Force on Business Ethics.

Rabbi Azarya Berzon, a student of Rav Soloveitchik, was also ordained at RIETS will be a one year Beit Midrash Scholar-in-Residence. He taught in Israel for 13 years, served in the Israeli army for 14 years, and in 1991 established Yeshiva Sha’arei Mevasseret Zion where he served as Rosh Yeshiva (professor of Talmud) for 18 years.

“Toronto is already known for its commitment to Torah,” said Rabbi Torczyner. “We will add to that potent mix by disseminating Torah as well as presenting our unique emphasis on building bridges in the Jewish community, on supporting the State of Israel, and on engaging the broader society. We will serve communities across the religious spectrum including high school and college students.”

Under Rabbi Torczyner’s leadership, the Beit Midrash will foster an open, dynamic community of learning. “Even beginners with nominal Jewish education will be put on a trajectory to advance their Jewish learning and empower them to delve into the rich texts of our tradition,” added Rabbi Torczyner.

In addition to Rabbis Torczyner and Berzon the Beit Midrash will be comprised of four scholars who are dedicated to honing their skills as serious Jewish educators. A significant portion of their day will be dedicated to intensive analysis and research of the wisdom of Jewish tradition. Their interaction with the community will actualize and transmit their passion and knowledge to create a true community Beit Midrash.

Rabbi Brander further explained that “the Beit Midrash represents our continuing effort to shape and create experiences that will serve as incubators for Jewish leaders. They also represent a vibrant initiative to enable communities to experience the wealth of resources and presence of Yeshiva University right in their backyard.”

Comments

Eichler founded the Jewish Studies Program at Penn beore coming to YU a year ago.

Aug 13, 2009 — Dr. Barry Eichler ’60Y, professor of Bible and ancient Near Eastern studies at Yeshiva College and Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, has accepted a two-year appointment as dean of Yeshiva College.

Eichler, a distinguished scholar and educator, joined YU full time last year after a 40-year career as professor of Assyriology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania. An alumnus of Yeshiva College, he has had a longstanding relationship with YU. He returned over the years as a visiting professor at Revel, and Yeshiva College honored him in 1993 with the Bernard Revel Outstanding Alumnus Award in Arts and Sciences.

“Professor Eichler is an academic scholar of the highest order who is dedicated to building the undergraduate enterprise at Yeshiva and advancing the quality of teaching and research,” said President Richard M. Joel. “He shares my commitment to have the student experience shine with integrity and inspiration, and to ensure that our students will be welcomed at the finest graduate and professional institutions and launched on successful careers.”

While at Penn, Eichler founded the Jewish Studies Program and served as its chair for 17 years. He also curated the Babylonian Tablet Collection at Penn’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Also during that time, Eichler taught at Penn’s Law School, was a visiting professor at Hebrew University and a fellow at Yale University.

Eichler is the author and editor of five books and dozens of articles. Most of his publications center on the study of the Bible in its ancient Near Eastern context.

Eichler has accepted his appointment with a deep sense of excitement and responsibility. “Students and faculty are the heart of the educational enterprise. I eagerly look forward to working together with students in strengthening both curricular and extra-curricular activities at YC,” he said. “I plan to create a student advisory board to the dean that will help channel the creativity and energy of our student body as we partner in exploring ways to enhance the undergraduate experience at Yeshiva.”

Speaking of faculty, he said, “I am strongly committed to faculty development and the welfare of junior faculty, the successful completion of our curricular initiatives and their timely implementation, the efforts to expand our student support services, including faculty advising, and the continued development of rules of faculty governance.”

Dean Eichler will succeed Dr. David Srolovitz who will be on leave as professor of physics, as he pursues a high-level research opportunity in Singapore, where he will serve as Scientific Advisor to the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research’s (A*STAR) Science and Engineering Research Council and Scientific Director to A*STAR’s Institute for High Performance Computing.

Comments

Jun 12, 2009 — Jewish communities throughout North America often struggle to find qualified teachers for Jewish schools that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship will fund five qualified recent college graduates this year—and 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at YU’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors this summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“This grant demonstrates the importance of the work we are doing,” said Joey Small, the Institute’s fellowship coordinator. “By recruiting and supporting these fellows in their initial years of teaching, the grant helps YU nurture the future leaders and practitioners in the field of Jewish education.”

The fellowship builds on the success of the Teacher Training and Give-Back Fellowships that were initiated a year ago. The Institute matched schools in Chicago, Memphis and Los Angeles with well-suited teachers. The new fellowship will continue to focus on schools outside the New York area, where the need for well-trained Jewish teachers is more acute.

Goldberg added, “We are excited to partner with schools across North America to develop the classroom professionals they need to ensure a quality Jewish educational experience for all our children.”

Comments

Mar 11, 2009 — As the economic downturn ripples through the US job market, Yeshiva University students, alumni and other community members interested in working in the Jewish community learned about various career opportunities at a job fair organized by YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) on the Wilf Campus on Feb 26.

Read the story in the Jewish Week.

More than 300 people attended the Jewish Job Fair, co-sponsored by the CJF in conjunction with the Institute for University-School Partnership at Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, the Career Development Center, the Yeshiva Student Union, Torah Activities Council and Jewish Social Enterprise Training (JSET), a student organization. Joining the 160 students who submitted resumes to CJF in advance were an additional 150 “walk ins,” both student and non-student, who attended on the day of the fair.

“The fair created and shared new venues for our young women and men to play a professional role in the Jewish community, and served as a resource for the entire Jewish community in these difficult times,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, dean of the CJF.

Twenty-one Jewish day schools from across the United States and 16 Jewish organizations participated in the fair.

Rabbi Shmuel Levine, head of Hillel Day School in Boca Raton, FL, spent the hours preceding the job fair interviewing YU seniors for teaching positions at his school. “One of the greatest challenges as an educator is finding quality Judaic studies faculty,” Levine said.

“This event helped us see the light at the end of the tunnel,” he said. “There is a real sense that the vision of the university is not just about YU but about the broader Jewish community and that’s exciting.”

Rabbi Daniel Kraut, executive director of Hillel Academy of Pittsburgh, said that his community’s search for a new rabbi through YU’s RIETS Rabbinic Placement Office gave him the idea to attend the fair. “It was only natural that we came to YU for the Jewish Job Fair to look for teachers,” Kraut said.

The fair was geared toward career development and not employment exclusively, said Aliza Berenholz and Keren Simon, CJF staff members and co-organizers of the event. Organizational representatives promoted a wide array of opportunities ranging from teaching positions and fellowships to scholarships for master’s programs and internships.

Erin Zimmerman, coordinator of a Young Judea Israel Program in New York City, for example, offered an alternate track for recent college graduates. The six-month program in Israel enables college graduates “to build their resumes by interning in their field of interest while experiencing Israeli culture.”

Recruiting for University Jewish Chaplaincy in England, Dov Lerner was looking for someone who would consider relocation to the U.K. “It’s an opportunity to be constructive in developing the Jewish community in England, in terms of systemizing kashrut [Jewish dietary laws] and education,” Lerner explained. “The American populace has more experience with this type of work.”

Berenholz and Simon plan to track the outcomes of the fair with a survey of the numbers of interviews and subsequent positions offered.

Comments

Jan 26, 2009 — Yeshiva University’s (YU) will hold its annual SOY (Student Organization of Yeshiva) Seforim Sale from February 1 to 22 on YU’s Wilf Campus in Manhattan, Belfer Hall, 2495 Amsterdam Avenue. Last year the acclaimed Judaica book sale drew more than 15,000 people from the tri-state area. Students, educators, and parents flock to the sale to take advantage of discounted prices on the latest of more than 10,000 titles in rabbinic and academic literature, as well as cookbooks, children’s books, musical recordings, and educational software.

The Seforim Sale has become a highlight for the Yeshiva University community, as students and alumni congregate to visit their alma mater, see old friends, and add books to their personal libraries.

“We expect another big turnout this year,” said Ophir Eis, CEO of the SOY Seforim Sale. “Aside from all the discounts available, we have a number of great events planned.”

The sale, North America’s largest Jewish book sale, is managed exclusively by students who run the entire operation from ordering to setting up the premises, marketing, and all the technology the project entails. Proceeds support SOY’s myriad of initiatives, which include student activities on campus and outreach programs in the Jewish community.

Scheduled events at the sale include:
• Alumni night on February 3, featuring a performance by the Maccabeats, the YU men’s a cappella group
• Live acoustic performance by Six13 on February 4
• A lecture by Dr. David Pelcovitz and Rabbi Steven Eisenberg on February 5 entitled,
“What happens when your child isn’t you: Understanding the religious change after year(s) of study in Israel”
• Musical performance by Aryeh Kuntsler on February 12
• Family Storytelling with Peninnah Schram, Professor of Speech and Drama at YU’s Stern College for Women on February 15
• Emunah cooking demonstration and book signing on February 16

For a complete listing of dates and times, to purchase gift certificates, or to view the online catalog, visit www.soyseforim.org.

Comments
October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Tag cloud

 

 

Most commented

  • None found