Yeshiva University News » Professor

Moses Pava

Apr 8, 2009 — While heated debates continued over the proposed bailout plan, Moses Pava, the Alvin Einbender Professor of Business Ethics at Sy Syms School of Business, said at a recent lecture that a change in consciousness at how our culture approaches wealth is more necessary than a change in policy.

The Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University sponsored the event at the Beren Campus on March 25, which drew a crowd eager for its topic: “The Great Financial Meltdown of 2008-2009: Jewish Ethics and Business Ethics.”

But instead of discussing politics or economics, Pava called for a cultural change, especially among high school and college-age students, by educating them in good ethics. He believes we need to broaden our understanding of business to integrate social and environmental effects.

“Rather than looking backwards and trying to place blame, I want to see Jewish ethics as a way of looking forward to a possible future,” Pava said. “Perhaps this crisis offers us an opportunity to reexamine some basic assumptions about our society and our culture. Rather than focusing on getting the bailout plan exactly right, I would question the entire assumption of individual economic self-interest.”

Examining entrepreneurship through a Jewish lens, Pava discussed social responsibility, which is apparent in Biblical institutions such as the Jubilee and Sabbatical Year and the commandment “to love the stranger.”

“I suggest that we challenge those who separate business affairs from the rest of life,” Pava stressed, “and that we resurrect and reinvigorate the Biblical vision of combining earning a livelihood and acting in a just and caring way.”

Pava, author of “Business Ethics: A Jewish Perspective” and the forthcoming “Jewish Ethics as Dialogue,” believes corporations should provide triple bottom-line statements that measure social and environmental, in addition to economic, performance.

He cited Timberland Company, maker of outdoor products with revenues of half a billion dollars a year, as an exemplary business. Its CEO, Jeff Swartz, has attributed his company’s commitment to social responsibility to his interest in Jewish values.

Pava drew insight from both ancient and modern sources. Rabbi Irwin Kula’s book “Yearnings: Embracing the Sacred Messiness of Life” provided him with spiritual guidance, while the Second Temple sage Yochanan ben Zakai “offered building blocks for a complete theory of entrepeneurship: creativity, playfulness, power, efficiency and independence joined integrally with continuity, seriousness, sacrifice, fairness and interdependence.”

As another prime case, Pava mentioned Aaron Feuerstein, an Orthodox Jew (and YU graduate) whose Polartec fleece company, Malden Mills, was destroyed in a fire in 1995.

Feuerstein shocked the country by continuing to pay his 3,000 unemployed workers’ salaries while he rebuilt his factory. The decision cost him $25 million before he was eventually forced to file for bankruptcy. He later explained his decision by quoting lessons learned from the Talmud.

Pava concluded that Feuerstein’s kindness to his employees offers “a glimpse of what life might look like if we somehow learn together what it means to love the stranger.”

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Peter Achinstein was appointed the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Professor of Philosophy at Yeshiva College.

Aug 27, 2008 — Yeshiva University continues the steady expansion of its faculty this academic year with the appointment of 30 new faculty members this fall. Of these, ten are newly created positions, some of which replace adjunct professors.

“We’re continuing the momentum forward to make sure we have a first-class faculty and to keep the student-to-faculty ratio at 10 to 1,” said Morton Lowengrub, PhD, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.

New faculty have been added across the entire University, with a particular focus on undergraduate philosophy, mathematics, English, biology, and Jewish studies. Three full professors have been hired in the philosophy, English, and math departments.

Peter Achinstein, a distinguished professor of history and philosophy of science from Johns Hopkins University, has been appointed the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Professor of Philosophy at Yeshiva College. Achinstein, who will begin in January 2009, will play a major role in the college’s Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program. Achinstein has won numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Lakatos Award from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and numerous research grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has written five books, edited seven others, and published widely in scholarly journals.

Linda Shires, PhD, an eminent scholar of Victorian literature, has been appointed professor of English at Stern College for Women. Previously at Syracuse University for the past 12 years, Shires has also taught at New York University and Princeton, from which she received her PhD in 1981. She has published widely and was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. She will take over the chair of the English department at Stern in fall 2009.

Yisong Yang, PhD, joins Yeshiva College as a professor of mathematics from Polytechnic University in Brooklyn. His areas of research are nonlinear partial differential equations, mathematical physics, and applied mathematics. Yang was an Othmer Senior Faculty Fellow at Polytechnic in 2006 and 2009, and he received the Institut Henri Poincare/Gauthier-Villars Prize in Paris in 1996. He has organized a number of national conferences and has received numerous research grants from the National Science Foundation.

Other Appointments:

Stern College for Women
Kira Adaricheva, Clinical Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Kim Evans, Associate Professor of English,
Patrycja Grzelonska, Assistant Professor of Economics
Richard Hidary, Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies
Lauren Levy Harburger, Assistant Professor of Psychology
Lee Manion, Assistant Professor of English
Matthew Miller, Assistant Professor of English
Marnin Young, Assistant Professor of Art

Yeshiva College
Joseph Angel, Instructor of Bible
Michael Machczynski, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Yakov Peter, Assistant Professor of Biology
Jessica Seessel, Instructor of English
Erin Stalcup, Instructor of English
Todd Thompson, Visiting Assistant Professor of English
Matthew Udkovich, Lecturer in French
G. Lee Warren, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Sy Syms School of Business
David Brock, Visiting Professor of Management
Shu Han, Assistant Professor of Information Systems
Joseph Kerstein, Visiting Professor of Accounting; Acting Director of the MS in Accounting, Program
Veneta Sotiropoulos, Instructor of Marketing

Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
Peter Markowitz, Clinical Assistant Professor of Law; Director of the Immigration Law Clinic

Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies
Daniel Tsadik, Assistant Professor of Sephardic and Iranian Studies

Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology
Michael S. Fisher, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology
Jeffrey Gonzalez, Assistant Professor of Psychology
John Pachankis, Assistant Professor of Psychology
Jody Resko, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology

Wurzweiler School of Social Work
Amanda Sisselman, Instructor of Social Work

For appointments at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, click here.



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Sep 24, 2007 — Some came to read favorite pieces of literature – John Donne’s sonnet, Death Be Not Proud, the George Herbert poem, Life – some came to read tehilim (Psalms). Some held back tears; others gave vent to their emotions. They all came to reflect on the life of Dr. Lana Schwebel, a dear friend, colleague and spirited teacher who died on July 7, following an automobile accident while touring the shores of Lake Baikal in southern Siberia.

The student-organized, open-microphone memorial on September 17 was attended by people from across the Yeshiva University (YU) community including YU President Richard M. Joel, and Dr. Karen Bacon, the Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean at YU’s Stern College for Women (SCW).

President Joel spoke about the reflective nature of Unetaneh Tokef (a prayer recited on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). “Even though man is like a withering flower, a passing dream, in order to be those things one has to first be a flower, there has to first be a dream. Lana was our flower – she was full of dreams and hopes,” said President Joel.

“Some people are able to live in either the world of ideas or the world of reality, but few people can be equally comfortable in both. Lana was one of those people,” said Dean Bacon.

Perhaps the most moving tributes came from her students – those whose lives she influenced at the very time when people yearn for a teacher to help them find their own voices and their own paths through life.

Shira Margulies spoke about how she could finally share her passion for Harry Potter with a teacher. Dr. Schwebel taught Latin to Ms. Margulies and they studied it together. When Ms. Margulies found out that Harry Potter was available in a Latin translation she told Dr. Schwebel, who said “I know isn’t that cool, I have a copy!”

Shira Schwartz (SCW’08), who organized the memorial, closed with a reading from Dr. Schwebel’s own
Tanakh – a discussion of the relationship between Elijah and Elisha his student.

Formerly an assistant professor of religion and literature at the Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School, Dr. Schwebel had been an assistant professor of English at SCW since 2006.
Ann Peters, a colleague of Dr. Schwebel’s in the English Department, said of her late friend and fellow teacher: “She was not only an expert on literature, but on dance, theater, New York restaurants, modern art, China, obscure Russian orthodox religious practices—really, there seemed to be nothing she hadn’t explored. Yet, she never passed on information in a way that made you feel she was showing off. Her teaching came out of a generous need to communicate.”

Dr. Schwebel, who held a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Barnard, taught Survey of English Literature, Love and War in Medieval Romance, Elementary Latin, Women in Medieval Literature and Masterpieces of World Literature.

Students have created a blog where they and others share thoughts about Dr. Schwebel and the impact her death has had on them – drlanaschwebel.blogspot.com.

She is survived by her parents, Philip and Lilly Schwebel, and her sisters Elizabeth Wind (and Shalom) and Pamela Swickley (and Gary).

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Dr. Lana Schwebel

Sep 20, 2007 — Some came to read favorite pieces of literature – John Donne’s sonnet, Death Be Not Proud, the George Herbert poem, Life – some came to read tehilim (Psalms). Some held back tears; others gave vent to their emotions. They all came to reflect on the life of Dr. Lana Schwebel, a dear friend, colleague and spirited teacher who died on July 7, following an automobile accident while touring the shores of Lake Baikal in southern Siberia.

The student-organized, open-microphone memorial on September 17 was attended by people from across the Yeshiva University (YU) community including YU President Richard M. Joel, and Dr. Karen Bacon, the Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean at YU’s Stern College for Women (SCW).

President Joel spoke about the reflective nature of Unetaneh Tokef (a prayer recited on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). “Even though man is like a withering flower, a passing dream, in order to be those things one has to first be a flower, there has to first be a dream. Lana was our flower – she was full of dreams and hopes,” said President Joel.

“Some people are able to live in either the world of ideas or the world of reality, but few people can be equally comfortable in both. Lana was one of those people,” said Dean Bacon.

Perhaps the most moving tributes came from her students – those whose lives she influenced at the very time when people yearn for a teacher to help them find their own voices and their own paths through life.

Shira Margulies (SCW ’08) spoke about how she could finally share her passion for Harry Potter with a teacher. Dr. Schwebel taught Latin to Ms. Margulies and they studied it together. When Ms. Margulies found out that Harry Potter was available in a Latin translation she told Dr. Schwebel, who said “I know isn’t that cool, I have a copy!”

Shira Schwartz (SCW’08), who organized the memorial, closed with a reading from Dr. Schwebel’s own Tanakh – a discussion of the relationship between Elijah and Elisha his student.

Formerly an assistant professor of religion and literature at the Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School, Dr. Schwebel had been an assistant professor of English at SCW since 2006.

Ann Peters, a colleague of Dr. Schwebel’s in the English Department, said of her late friend and fellow teacher, “She was not only an expert on literature, but on dance, theater, New York restaurants, modern art, China, obscure Russian orthodox religious practices—really, there seemed to be nothing she hadn’t explored. Yet, she never passed on information in a way that made you feel she was showing off. Her teaching came out of a generous need to communicate.”

Dr. Schwebel, who held a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Barnard, taught Survey of English Literature, Love and War in Medieval Romance, Elementary Latin, Women in Medieval Literature and Masterpieces of World Literature.

Students have created a blog where they and others share thoughts about Dr. Schwebel and the impact her death has had on them.

Dr. Schwebel is survived by her parents, Philip and Lilly Schwebel, and her sisters Elizabeth Wind (and Shalom) and Pamela Swickley (and Gary).

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Professor Michel Rosenfeld

Aug 24, 2007 — The government of the greater Paris region has appointed Michel Rosenfeld, the Justice Sydney L. Robins Professor of Human Rights at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, to an International Blaise Pascal Research Chair. These chairs are awarded annually to preeminent scholars in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities to conduct research and deliver public lectures in the Paris region. Rosenfeld, who is also director of the Program in Security, Democracy, and the Rule of Law at Cardozo, is only the second legal scholar to be appointed since these chairs were established in 1996.

Since its inception 11 years ago, the Blaise Pascal Chair has been awarded to 50 international scholars; 19 have been Americans and include two Nobel Prize winners. They are administered by the École Normale Supérieure (ENS-Paris), France’s most prestigious institution for the training of academics. Each chair holder’s research project is sponsored by a Parisian academic institution; in Professor Rosenfeld’s case it will be the University of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne), which includes France’s top law school.

The Blaise Pascal Chair will enable Professor Rosenfeld to continue his research on “Rethinking Constitutionalism in an Era of Globalization and Privatization,” a project he started through Cardozo’s Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy. He is co-organizing two international conferences this fall, one in Paris and the other in New York, on November 4-5, 2007 to be held jointly by Cardozo and NYU Law School in commemoration of the fifth anniversary of the International Journal of Constitutional Law (I. CON), of which he is editor-in-chief.

Professor Rosenfeld plans to spend his spring 2008 sabbatical semester in Paris conducting research and participating at conferences, followed by shorter trips to Paris for conferences and public lectures during the 2008-2009 academic year.

Professor Rosenfeld, who has been a member of the Cardozo faculty since 1988, is widely published in several languages in the fields of American and comparative constitutional law and legal theory. His books include Just Interpretations: Law Between Ethics and Politics and Affirmative Action and Justice: A Philosophical and Constitutional Inquiry. He was the president of the International Association of Constitutional Law from 1999-2004. Among his many honors is the French government’s highest and most prestigious award, the Legion of Honor.

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Feb 12, 2007 — Richard Steiner, PhD, professor of Semitic languages and literature at Yeshiva University’s Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, deciphered the earliest connected Semitic texts and presented the results of this research publicly for the first time at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Dr. Steiner’s lecture, entitled “Proto-Canaanite Spells in the Pyramid Texts: A First Look at the History of Hebrew in the Third Millennium BCE,” was sponsored by the Academy of the Hebrew Language in cooperation with the Hebrew University and the World Union of Jewish Studies. His lecture is posted online at http://hebrew-academy.huji.ac.il.

In his presentation, Dr. Steiner interpreted Semitic passages in Egyptian texts that were discovered more than a century ago, inscribed on the subterranean walls of the pyramid of King Unas at Saqqara in Egypt. The pyramid dates from the 24th century BCE, but Egyptologists agree that the texts are older. The dates proposed for them range from the 25th to the 30th centuries BCE. No connected Semitic texts from this period have ever been deciphered before.

“This finding should be of great interest to cultural historians,” said Dr. Steiner, a past fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies at the Hebrew University and a member of the Academy of the Hebrew Language. “Linguists, too, will be interested in these texts. They show that Proto-Canaanite, the common ancestor of Phoenician, Moabite, Ammonite and Hebrew, existed already in the third millennium BCE as a language distinct from Aramaic, Ugaritic, and the other Semitic languages. And they provide the first direct evidence for the pronunciation of Egyptian in this early period.” The texts will also be important to biblical scholars, since they shed light on several rare words in the Bible, he said.

The passages, serpent spells written in hieroglyphic characters, had puzzled scholars who tried to read them as if they were ordinary Egyptian texts. In August 2002, Dr. Steiner received an e-mail message from Robert Ritner, professor of Egyptology at the University of Chicago, asking whether any of them could be Semitic. “I immediately recognized the Semitic words for ‘mother snake,’” Dr. Steiner said. “Later it became clear that the surrounding spells, composed in Egyptian rather than Semitic, also speak of the divine mother snake, and that the Egyptian and Semitic texts elucidate each other.”

Although written in Egyptian characters, the texts turned out to be composed in the Semitic language spoken by the Canaanites in the third millennium BCE, a very archaic form of the languages later known as Phoenician and Hebrew. The Canaanite priests of the ancient city of Byblos, in present-day Lebanon, provided these texts to the kings of Egypt. While the Egyptians took a disparaging view of their neighbors’ culture, their fear of snakes and desire to protect royal mummies against them made them open to the borrowing of Semitic magic

“This is a sensational discovery,” said Moshe Bar-Asher, Bialik Professor of Hebrew Language at the Hebrew University and president of the Academy of the Hebrew Language. “It is the earliest attestation of a Semitic language, in general, and Proto-Canaanite, in particular.”

The discovery has made news around the world, appearing in USA Today, the International Herald Tribune, National Geographic, Haaretz, Jerusalem Post, and MSNBC.com.

Dr. Steiner plans to publish his findings in an English article or monograph intended for specialists in Semitics and Egyptology.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Oct 1, 2006 — Susan Band Horwitz, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor and co-chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and the Falkenstein Professor of Cancer Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine.

Members are elected through a highly selective process that recognizes people who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health. Election is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of medicine and health.

Dr. Horwitz, who was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 2005, is world-renowned for her pioneering work in elucidating the mechanisms of action of anti-tumor agents. Her pivotal research in the 1980’s eventually led to the development of Taxol®, one of the most important anti-cancer agents ever developed. In recent years, she has focused on the mechanisms of drug resistance, an increasingly serious problem in cancer treatment.

Dr. Horwitz received her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. in biochemistry from Brandeis University. She joined the Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty in 1968, and became a professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology in 1980 and the co-chair of that department in 1985. Dr. Horwitz was appointed Rose C. Falkenstein Professor of Cancer Research in 1986, Associate Director for Therapeutics at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center in 2000, and Distinguished Professor in 2005.

Dr. Horwitz is a past-president of the American Association for Cancer Research. She has received numerous honors and awards including the Cain Memorial Award of the American Association for Cancer Research in 1992, the ASPET Award for Experimental Therapeutics in 1994, the C. Chester Stock Award from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1996, the Barnard College Medal of Distinction in 2003, and the Mayor’s Award for Excellence in Science & Technology in 2004.

Dr. Horwitz was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994 and she received the Warren Alpert Foundation Prize from Harvard Medical School in 2005. She is a member of the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

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Sep 20, 2006 — Allan W. Wolkoff, M.D., professor of medicine and of anatomy & structural biology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, will receive the 2006 Distinguished Service Award presented by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) at its annual meeting this October.

Presented annually, the Distinguished Service Award will honor Dr. Wolkoff for his service to AASLD while also recognizing his lifelong commitment to the field of liver disease research.

Throughout his career, Dr. Wolkoff, who is also associate director of the Marion Bessin Liver Research Center at Einstein and director of its Belfer Institute for Advanced Biomedical Studies, has been a pivotal contributor to the overall mission of AASLD in many different ways. This includes serving as an editorial board member and an associate editor of HEPATOLOGY, as an AASLD councilor-at-large, as a member of the Basic Research and the Training and Workforce Committees, and as an AASLD representative to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. He currently chairs the Hepatobiliary Pathophysiology Study Section at the NIH. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the American Liver Foundation, serving as Chair of Public Policy.

During his career, Dr. Wolkoff has been a major contributor to the literature that has defined the basic mechanisms contributing to liver disease. He has authored more than 150 peer reviewed research papers, review articles, and book chapters; and his work is regularly selected for presentations at AASLD meetings. His work has consistently been funded by the NIH, published in leading scientific journals, and recognized nationally and internationally by distinguished lectureships and honors.

Dr. Wolkoff received his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College, where he also completed his first two years of medical school. He completed his medical education at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He has been a member of the Einstein faculty since 1976 and lives in Mamaroneck, N.Y.

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Prof. Morris Altman will deliver Yeshiva University's 2006 Alexander Brody Lecture in Economics.

Jan 4, 2006 — Morris Altman, professor and head of the Department of Economics at the University of Saskatchewan and elected fellow of the World Innovation Foundation, is scheduled to deliver Yeshiva University’s annual Alexander Brody Lecture in Economics Feb. 23 on the Wilf Campus.

Prof. Altman’s presentation, “Is There Free Will in Economics? The Ethical Economy and Free Markets” will take place at 7:30 pm in Belfer Hall, room 502. The lecture will be preceded by a dinner at 6 pm.

A former visiting scholar at Cornell, Duke, Hebrew, and Stanford universities, Prof. Altman was recently elected President of the Society for Advancement of Behavioral Economics (SABE). He is also the editor of the Journal of Socio-Economics (Elsevier Science) and former associate editor of the Journal of Economic Psychology. Prof. Altman has published more than 60 papers on behavioral economics, economic history, and empirical macroeconomics and three books in economic theory and public policy. He has made more than 100 international presentations on these subjects. Most recently he has published A Handbook of Contemporary Behavioral Economics Foundations and Developments and Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance with M.E. Sharpe.

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Dec 7, 2005 — Susan Crawford, a member of the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law faculty since 2003, has been nominated to the board of directors of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a not-for-profit organization responsible for assigning Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and managing the worldwide system of domain names.

Professor Crawford officially joined the board on December 4, 2005 at the conclusion of ICANN’s Annual General Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, and her term will end at the conclusion of the organization’s annual meeting in 2008.

“Susan’s nomination to the ICANN Board of Directors is well deserved and will inform her scholarship and provide an exciting aspect to her teaching at Cardozo,” Dean David Rudenstine said. “She has written extensively about ICANN, is extremely knowledgeable about the issues and policy, and will be an asset to the organization.”

“The ICANN experiment is a big idea that meets a crucial need,” said Professor Crawford on her blog. “It’s not a regulatory agency. It’s a forum for the discussion of global policies for domain names. Its form of standard-setting (which includes policymaking), done right, should match the way the Internet works: Most things should be left to local control, with only a few global rules imposed with which most people are willing to go along.”

Professor Crawford, a well-known expert in cyberlaw, is the only newly nominated board member. She joins Njeri Rionge of Kenya, Africa, who was reappointed this year. Crawford, who is an advocate for keeping the Internet open and free, came to Cardozo from the law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, where she was a partner.

Her practice, which included litigation, counseling, and transactional work, focused on intellectual property, advertising, privacy, domain names, and ecommerce policy issues. Crawford is a Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude graduate of Yale College, a graduate of Yale Law School, a Policy Fellow with the Center for Democracy and Technology, and a Fellow of the Yale Law School Information Society Project.

Among Professor Crawford’s current projects is the founding of OneWebDay, a way to celebrate, according to Crawford, “the health and diversity of the Internet, and to remind people they need to work to maintain the values that have made the Internet a gift.” Similar to Earth Day, OneWebDay will be celebrated around the globe on September 22.

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