Yeshiva University News » School

Jun 30, 2010 — Dr. Marina Holz, assistant professor of biology at Stern College for Women, has received an NIH Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) R15 grant for identification and characterization of S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) targets in mammary cell proliferation. S6K1 is a therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

Holz’s research will attempt to provide a comprehensive assessment of the therapeutic potential of the S6K1 signaling pathway by identifying and characterizing downstream effectors of the S6K1 pathway in breast cancer cells.

“Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women,” explained Holz. “Current chemotherapies are indiscriminate, have toxic side effects and, in about half of the patients, do not prevent cancer progression or recurrence. We are hoping to identify new therapeutic targets against which new chemotherapy agents could be developed. These new drugs could be then used in the clinic in combination with other regiments to achieve greater response.”

The AREA grant, supported by funds provided to the National Institutes of Health under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009, supports small research projects in the biomedical and behavioral sciences conducted by faculty and students. The funds provided by this grant—totaling $408,000 over three years—will be used to support student research during the academic year and the summer semester in Holz’s lab.

This summer, Stern College students Faygel Beren, Miriam Steinberger and Tirtza Speigel, as well as research fellow Myriam Maruani ’09S, will work in the Holz lab on this and various other projects.

“This award represents an historic milestone for YU,” said Holz. “Receiving an NIH grant is a rite of passage for most biomedical researchers. I view this as a validation that the research environment at YU is nationally competitive and on par with the best research colleges.”

A resident of Greenwich, CT, Dr. Holz has supervised undergraduate honors projects at Stern since 2007. She received her PhD from Harvard Medical School.

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Sep 2, 2009 — Throughout North America, schools in smaller Jewish communities often struggle to find qualified teachers that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is funding five qualified recent college graduates this year—and will fund 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

One of the fellows, Raphael Rosenzweig of Syracuse, New York, will spend the year teaching Jewish History and Chumash in Dallas’ Yavneh and Akiba Academies.

“I want to have an impact in the Jewish community,” explained Rosenzweig, who graduated Yeshiva College in 2007 with a degree in English literature. “I find learning fascinating and want to make education exciting for others, but I recognized that simply having a strong interest and passion isn’t enough.”

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors during the summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

“We know how difficult it can be for new teachers,” said Rabbi Meir Tannenbaum, director of Judaic curriculum at Yavneh Academy. “We hope this program will help support Rafi during this crucial first year.”

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“This grant demonstrates the importance of the work we are doing,” said Joey Small, the Institute’s fellowship coordinator. “By recruiting and supporting these fellows in their initial years of teaching, the grant helps YU nurture the future leaders and practitioners in the field of Jewish education.”

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is open to students from all colleges. Visit the Institute’s Web site at www.yu.edu/azrieli/schoolpartnership for more information or to apply.

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Sep 6, 2007 — New York, NY September 5, 2007 – Shulamit Roditi-Kulak of Newton, MA is one of nine graduates of Yeshiva University’s (YU) Stern College for Women (SCW) who will not have to contend with the financial burdens of medical school education, thanks to the generosity of a woman she will never meet.

Anne Scheiber, who managed to accumulate an estate worth $22 million before she died in 1995, left it all to YU expressly for SCW students and graduates. The medical school fund, one of two funds, is for medical education at the university’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM).

The awards are based on financial need, and amounts can be as high as full tuition for all four years of medical school. Students must be accepted to Einstein prior to being nominated for the scholarship. The students also must demonstrate leadership potential, initiative, or creative excellence and indicate a desire to help humanity through their studies in order to qualify.

Ms. Scheiber, who was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1893, paid her own way through law school, and found employment as a federal tax auditor. Throughout her 23-year career, she received superior performance reviews, but was never promoted. She attributed this to being Jewish and a woman. When she retired, she devoted herself to investing in the stock market, where religion and gender didn’t matter. She had a keen understanding of the financial markets and was a savvy investor. By the time she died at age 101, she had parlayed a few thousand dollars of savings into a stock portfolio of some $22 million, which she bequeathed to YU – an institution with which she had no previous contact – to give young Jewish women opportunities she never had.
Ms. Roditi-Kulak feels that “Stern, with its combination of Jewish and secular studies and big city experiences, became the perfect incubator for medical school and a meaningful and fulfilled life,” she said. “I feel as if an unimaginable dream has come true,” said Ms. Roditi-Kulak.

Add one- YU Graduate Receives Pioneering Medical School Scholarship
“With the practice of medicine in so much flux, it is inspiring to know that so many Stern College women—who possess the intellectual skills to solve problems and the empathic skills to care for others—are entering the profession,” said Karen Bacon, PhD, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern. “They can and will make a difference.”
This year’s other scholarship recipients are Yelena Kozirovsky of (Ukraine); Ariella Nadler of Toronto, Canada; Michelle Simpser of Plainview, NY; Tehilla Stepansky of Passaic, NJ; Amanda Weiss of Miami Beach, FL; Elisheva Levine of Woodmere, NY; and Jordana Platt of New York, NY.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Sep 6, 2007 — Michal Simpser of Plainview is one of nine graduates of Yeshiva University’s (YU) Stern College for Women (SCW) who will not have to contend with the financial burdens of medical school education, thanks to the generosity of a woman she will never meet.

Anne Scheiber, who managed to accumulate an estate worth $22 million before she died in 1995, left it all to YU expressly for SCW students and graduates. The medical school fund, one of two funds, is for medical education at the university’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM).

The awards are based on financial need, and amounts can be as high as full tuition for all four years of medical school. Students must be accepted to Einstein prior to being nominated for the scholarship. The students also must demonstrate leadership potential, initiative, or creative excellence and indicate a desire to help humanity through their studies in order to qualify.

Ms. Scheiber, who was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1893, paid her own way through law school, and found employment as a federal tax auditor. Throughout her 23-year career, she received superior performance reviews, but was never promoted. She attributed this to being Jewish and a woman. When she retired, she devoted herself to investing in the stock market, where religion and gender didn’t matter. She had a keen understanding of the financial markets and was a savvy investor. By the time she died at age 101, she had parlayed a few thousand dollars of savings into a stock portfolio of some $22 million, which she bequeathed to YU – an institution with which she had no previous contact – to give young Jewish women opportunities she never had.

“The scholarship is a blessing,” Ms. Simpser said. “It will enable me to concentrate on my studies without the added stress of loans. I am thankful to have the freedom to explore many different options while at AECOM.” Both Ms. Simpser’s parents are YU alumni and her father is also an AECOM alumnus.

“With the practice of medicine in so much flux, it is inspiring to know that so many Stern College women—who possess the intellectual skills to solve problems and the empathic skills to care for others—are entering the profession,” said Karen Bacon, PhD, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern. “They can and will make a difference.”
This year’s other scholarship recipients are Yelena Kozirovsky of (Ukraine); Ariella Nadler of Toronto, Canada; Tehilla Stepansky of Passaic, NJ; Amanda Weiss of Miami Beach, FL; Elisheva Levine of Woodmere, NY; Shulamit Roditi-Kulak of Newton, MA; and Jordana Platt of New York, NY.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Sep 6, 2007 — Tehilla Stepansky of Passaic is one of nine graduates of Yeshiva University’s (YU) Stern College for Women (SCW) who will not have to contend with the financial burdens of medical school education, thanks to the generosity of a woman she will never meet.

Anne Scheiber, who managed to accumulate an estate worth $22 million before she died in 1995, left it all to YU expressly for SCW students and graduates. The medical school fund, one of two funds, is for medical education at the university’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM).

The awards are based on financial need, and amounts can be as high as full tuition for all four years of medical school. Students must be accepted to Einstein prior to being nominated for the scholarship. The students also must demonstrate leadership potential, initiative, or creative excellence and indicate a desire to help humanity through their studies in order to qualify.

Ms. Scheiber, who was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1893, paid her own way through law school, and found employment as a federal tax auditor. Throughout her 23-year career, she received superior performance reviews, but was never promoted. She attributed this to being Jewish and a woman. When she retired, she devoted herself to investing in the stock market, where religion and gender didn’t matter. She had a keen understanding of the financial markets and was a savvy investor. By the time she died at age 101, she had parlayed a few thousand dollars of savings into a stock portfolio of some $22 million, which she bequeathed to YU – an institution with which she had no previous contact – to give young Jewish women opportunities she never had.

“This scholarship will enable me to focus on my studies without the financial worries that come along with studying medicine,” Ms. Stepansky said. “I also believe that it will allow me more freedom to decide on a specialty. Words cannot even begin to express my gratitude.”

“With the practice of medicine in so much flux, it is inspiring to know that so many Stern College women—who possess the intellectual skills to solve problems and the empathic skills to care for others—are entering the profession,” said Karen Bacon, PhD, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern. “They can and will make a difference.”
This year’s other scholarship recipients are Yelena Kozirovsky of (Ukraine); Ariella Nadler of Toronto, Canada; Michal Simpser of Plainview, NY; Amanda Weiss of Miami Beach, FL; Elisheva Levine of Woodmere, NY; Shulamit Roditi-Kulak of Newton, MA; and Jordana Platt of New York, NY.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Sep 6, 2007 — Elisheva Levine of Woodmere is one of nine graduates of Yeshiva University’s (YU) Stern College for Women (SCW) who will not have to contend with the financial burdens of medical school education, thanks to the generosity of a woman she will never meet.

Anne Scheiber, who managed to accumulate an estate worth $22 million before she died in 1995, left it all to YU expressly for SCW students and graduates. The medical school fund, one of two funds, is for medical education at the university’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM).

The awards are based on financial need, and amounts can be as high as full tuition for all four years of medical school. Students must be accepted to Einstein prior to being nominated for the scholarship. The students also must demonstrate leadership potential, initiative, or creative excellence and indicate a desire to help humanity through their studies in order to qualify.

Ms. Scheiber, who was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1893, paid her own way through law school, and found employment as a federal tax auditor. Throughout her 23-year career, she received superior performance reviews, but was never promoted. She attributed this to being Jewish and a woman. When she retired, she devoted herself to investing in the stock market, where religion and gender didn’t matter. She had a keen understanding of the financial markets and was a savvy investor. By the time she died at age 101, she had parlayed a few thousand dollars of savings into a stock portfolio of some $22 million, which she bequeathed to YU – an institution with which she had no previous contact – to give young Jewish women opportunities she never had.

Ms. Levine, the daughter of Saul and Yehudit Levine, and a graduate of Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway (HAFTR), is grateful that she “will be able to focus all her energy on her studies.”. “It’s a very special honor and a unique opportunity,” she said.

“With the practice of medicine in so much flux, it is inspiring to know that so many Stern College women—who possess the intellectual skills to solve problems and the empathic skills to care for others—are entering the profession,” said Karen Bacon, PhD, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern. “They can and will make a difference.”
This year’s other scholarship recipients are Shulamit Roditi-Kulak of Newton, MA; Yelena Kozirovsky of (Ukraine); Elisheva Levine of Woodmere, NY; Michelle Simpser of Plainview, NY; Tehilla Stepansky of Passaic, NJ; Amanda Weiss of Miami Beach, FL; and Jordana Platt of New York, NY
Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Sep 6, 2007 — Helen Nissim of Los Angeles is one of nine graduates of Yeshiva University’s (YU) Stern College for Women (SCW) who will not have to contend with the financial burdens of medical school education, thanks to the generosity of a woman she will never meet.

Anne Scheiber, who managed to accumulate an estate worth $22 million before she died in 1995, left it all to YU expressly for SCW students and graduates. The medical school fund, one of two funds, is for medical education at the university’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM).

The awards are based on financial need, and amounts can be as high as full tuition for all four years of medical school. Students must be accepted to Einstein prior to being nominated for the scholarship. The students also must demonstrate leadership potential, initiative, or creative excellence and indicate a desire to help humanity through their studies in order to qualify.

Ms. Scheiber, who was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1893, paid her own way through law school, and found employment as a federal tax auditor. Throughout her 23-year career, she received superior performance reviews, but was never promoted. She attributed this to being Jewish and a woman. When she retired, she devoted herself to investing in the stock market, where religion and gender didn’t matter. She had a keen understanding of the financial markets and was a savvy investor. By the time she died at age 101, she had parlayed a few thousand dollars of savings into a stock portfolio of some $22 million, which she bequeathed to YU – an institution with which she had no previous contact – to give young Jewish women opportunities she never had.

While growing up in Los Angeles and Israel, Ms. Nissim developed an interest in both science and medicine. “I enjoyed the exhilaration that came from tackling a difficult scientific problem,” she said. After high school she volunteered in an organization for children with chronic diseases, an experience that convinced her that medicine was her calling. Ms. Nissim is grateful that, having received the Scheiber Scholarship, she can now pursue her goal of becoming a physician “and being a productive individual in my community.”

“With the practice of medicine in so much flux, it is inspiring to know that so many Stern College women—who possess the intellectual skills to solve problems and the empathic skills to care for others—are entering the profession,” said Karen Bacon, PhD, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern. “They can and will make a difference.”
This year’s other scholarship recipients are Shulamit Roditi-Kulak of Newton, MA; Yelena Kozirovsky of (Ukraine); Elisheva Levine of Woodmere, NY; Michelle Simpser of Plainview, NY; Tehilla Stepansky of Passaic, NJ; Amanda Weiss of Miami Beach, FL; Ariella Nadler of Toronto, Canada; and Jordana Platt of New York, NY

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Dec 19, 2005 — Sixteen undergraduate students from Yeshiva University are traveling with American Jewish World Service (AJWS )to Las Bendiciones in Central Honduras in January as part of the university’s first Alternative Break, a new humanitarian mission.

Las Bendiciones is a remote village in the province of San Jeronimo with no electricity. The Yeshiva University group will stay in the village for the week and work alongside community members to build a school that should be finished within the week.

While there, students will interact with the villagers, engage in Jewish text studies, and learn about issues relevant to the developing world.

Upon their return, the 16 students will initiate follow-up projects, including fundraising, raising awareness about poverty, AIDS, fair trade, etc.

Moshe Grusgott, a semicha student at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, and Rebecca Stone, Presidential Fellow for University Life are the YU group’s leaders. Group leaders from AJWS are Ira Horowitz and Rachel Gordon. Mr. Horowitz worked with YU students last year on Darfur activism, and Ms. Gordon is the Program Coordinator for all Alternative Break trips for AJWS.

American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is an international development organization that helps thousands of people in Africa, Asia, and the Americas move beyond poverty, illiteracy, disaster, and war. AJWS believes that empowering individuals and communities regardless of race, religion, or nationality advances human dignity and transforms the world for the better.

Mr. Grusgott will take care of all halakhic issues on the trip and is preparing to answer all kashrut and Shabbat questions.

For questions, contact Rebecca Stone at 212-960-5400 ext. 5440, or email at rstone@yu.edu.

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May 31, 2005 — Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration of Yeshiva University (YU) will present a one-day seminar for high school teachers affiliated with the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools (AMODS), a YU-sponsored network of Jewish day schools and yeshivas. The seminar will take place Wed., June 29 at the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT).

Dr. Moshe Sokolow will lead the seminar, on “Insights into Torah and Parshanut (Commentaries).” He is the Fanya Gottesfeld Heller Professor of Jewish Education at Azrieli Graduate School; author of numerous works on Jewish Bible and scholarship, as well as curricular material for teachers; and editor of Ten Da’at, a journal of Jewish education, and “Texts and Topics: Curricular Instruction Materials for Jewish Educators.” He received his BA, MA, and PhD degrees from Yeshiva University.

The seminar will include sessions on methodology, pedagogy, model lessons, and the use of computers (data bases, internal searches, and arranging lessons), and is free-of-charge to teachers in AMODS schools. To register and for further information, please contact Sam Kapustin, principal of Jewish studies at CHAT, at 416-636-5984. Session details are available upon request.

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Oct 14, 2004 — Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University broke ground on Oct. 13 for a 201,000 square foot research building at the corner of Morris Park Avenue and Eastchester Road in the Bronx. The new $200 million facility, to be built on property leased from the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation for a period of 99 years, represents an unusual collaboration between a private institution and a public entity.

The new five-story building will be named in honor of Michael F. Price and Muriel Block and her late husband Harold, who have made the two largest gifts in the 50- year history of the medical school. Mr. Price, a pioneer in the mutual fund industry, made a donation of $25 million toward the creation of the Michael F. Price Center for Genetic and Translational Medicine at Einstein. The Price Center will be housed in the new Harold and Muriel Block Research Pavilion. Mrs. Block’s gift, valued at $21 million, is the second largest donation ever received by the medical school.

“We are extremely grateful to Mrs. Block and Mr. Price for their extraordinarily generous gifts,” said Ira M. Millstein, chairperson of the Einstein Board of Overseers. “We are also most appreciative to Jacobi Medical Center, to the Health and Hospitals Corporation and to the City of New York for their cooperation in arranging for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine to lease 10 acres of land from Jacobi Medical Center, nearly doubling the size of the College’s Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus.” Jacobi, a public hospital, is a teaching affiliate of the medical school.

“The research that will take place in the Price Center and Block Pavilion will be at the frontier of biomedical science and has the potential to impact every area of medicine from cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes to genetic disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and many others,” explained Dr. Dominick P. Purpura, The Marilyn and Stanley M. Katz Dean of the medical school. “We will focus on genetic medicine and use our laboratory findings to develop medical advances that will benefit residents of the Bronx, New York City and, in the long term, the entire world,” Dr. Purpura said.

Einstein’s new building represents the largest medical research facility to be constructed in the Bronx since the College of Medicine opened in 1955. Designed by the architectural firm of Payette and Associates, the building will house 40 state-of-the-art laboratories in addition to research support facilities and a 100-seat auditorium. Tishman Construction Company is the construction manager. It is estimated that 400 people will be employed in the new building, which is expected to be completed by 2008.

Located directly opposite Einstein’s Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus, the Price Center and Block Pavilion will significantly increase the size of the Bronx campus from its original 16-acres to 26 acres. The building’s design will further advance Einstein’s long-standing emphasis on fostering scientific collaboration among its faculty and researchers. Each floor will contain “open laboratories” where biomedical researchers may easily consult with one another.

For nearly five decades, the College of Medicine has been a leader in genetics, establishing the first Department of Genetics in any medical school in the country. Recently, researchers at Einstein successfully helped to map the human genome.

The groundbreaking ceremonies for the Price Center and Block Pavilion took place as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine prepares to celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2005. Since it first opened its doors to students on September 12, 1955, the accomplishments of Einstein’s scientific investigators and the excellence of its programs in basic and clinical research have been widely recognized. The College consistently ranks among the nation’s leaders in basic research support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The medical school also has earned “Center of Excellence” status from the NIH in five major biomedical fields—brain research, cancer, diabetes, liver disease, and sickle-cell disease.

The College’s student body has grown to more than 1,000 including students at the medical school, at its Sue Golding Graduate Division of Medical Sciences and at its Belfer Institute for Advanced Biomedical Studies. More than 7,000 men and women have earned M.D., Ph.D. and combined M.D.-PhD. degrees at Einstein since its founding nearly 50 years ago.

Additionally, the College of Medicine runs the largest post-graduate medical training program in the country, offering some 150 residency programs to more than 2,500 interns and residents at its affiliated hospitals. Einstein’s affiliates span the entire New York metropolitan area, and include Montefiore Medical Center, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Jacobi Medical Center, Beth Israel Medical Center and Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center.

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