Yeshiva University News » Support

Sep 16, 2009 — A new fellowship offered by Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women this fall, with the partnership and support of the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women (JFEW), will enable high-achieving, incoming sophomores to excel in the sciences.

“Stern College is home to a record number of women enrolled in science programs in preparation for careers in both clinical areas and research,” said Dr. Karen Bacon, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern. “With the support and encouragement of the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women, a select group will now have the benefit of enhanced scholarships, individual mentoring and stipends to conduct research—a combination that will inevitably lead to the highest levels of achievement.”

The 10 recipients of the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women Science Fellowship will receive $10,000 annually in scholarship support for three years. An additional 10 will be awarded the fellowship next year. Each JFEW Fellow will have the opportunity to participate in summer research internships for which they will be offered a work stipend of $2,500.

The fellows will be offered leadership opportunities over the course of their academic career, including attending and presenting research at national and international science conferences.

In addition, they will receive one-on-one mentoring by a member of the Stern science faculty to foster and encourage academic achievement. The mentors will advise the students on course selection, research experience and preparation for graduate school applications.

The students will also participate in lectures and workshops on topics addressing leadership training, career development and academic success. The first year will focus on getting the most from an undergraduate education; the second year will feature workshops on developing research; and the final year will concentrate on transitioning to post-graduate life.

“Since 1880, JFEW has helped women to achieve their educational aspirations and to contribute to society,” said Jill Smith, vice president and chair of the foundation’s Jewish Community Program. “Stern is similarly committed to women’s educational achievement. We are proud to collaborate with Stern on the creation of this exciting and innovative program.”

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Sep 2, 2009 — Throughout North America, schools in smaller Jewish communities often struggle to find qualified teachers that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is funding five qualified recent college graduates this year—and will fund 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

One of the fellows, Jonathan Moses, will spend the year as a teacher in Philadelphia’s Stern Hebrew High School.

“Ever since a young age I have felt a propensity towards chinuch [education],” said Moses, a Philadelphia native who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a major in linguistics and a minor in cognitive science.

The school’s “fresh manifestation of an age-old philosophy” is what drew Moses to Stern. “It has quickly become an integral part of the community in which I grew up.”

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors during the summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

Rabbi Rafi Eis, limudei kodesh [Jewish studies] teacher and Israel advisor at Stern, will serve as Moses’ mentor. “The first year of teaching can be overwhelming,” explained Rabbi Eis. “I will look to help Jonathan reflect on his practice and support him. We will meet weekly and sit in on each other’s classes – seeing how we can keep improving.”

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“If our rebbeim and morot are to have a positive impact on their students, they simply must receive training in pedagogy, differentiated instruction, classroom management and be exposed to current thinking and best practices in education,” said Rabbi Mordechai Wecker, head of school at Stern Hebrew High School.

“Yeshiva University is uniquely positioned to support these efforts and play a critical role in enhancing the professionalism and effectiveness of our Judaic studies teachers.”

The Teacher Training Fellowship is open to students from all colleges. Visit the Institute’s Web site at www.yu.edu/azrieli/schoolpartnership for more information or to apply.

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Sep 2, 2009 — Throughout North America, schools in smaller Jewish communities often struggle to find qualified teachers that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is funding five qualified recent college graduates this year—and will fund 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

One of the fellows, Raphael Rosenzweig of Syracuse, New York, will spend the year teaching Jewish History and Chumash in Dallas’ Yavneh and Akiba Academies.

“I want to have an impact in the Jewish community,” explained Rosenzweig, who graduated Yeshiva College in 2007 with a degree in English literature. “I find learning fascinating and want to make education exciting for others, but I recognized that simply having a strong interest and passion isn’t enough.”

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors during the summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

“We know how difficult it can be for new teachers,” said Rabbi Meir Tannenbaum, director of Judaic curriculum at Yavneh Academy. “We hope this program will help support Rafi during this crucial first year.”

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“This grant demonstrates the importance of the work we are doing,” said Joey Small, the Institute’s fellowship coordinator. “By recruiting and supporting these fellows in their initial years of teaching, the grant helps YU nurture the future leaders and practitioners in the field of Jewish education.”

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is open to students from all colleges. Visit the Institute’s Web site at www.yu.edu/azrieli/schoolpartnership for more information or to apply.

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Aug 25, 2009 — Throughout North America, schools in smaller Jewish communities often struggle to find qualified teachers that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is funding five qualified recent college graduates this year—and will fund 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

One of the fellows, Rabbi Arye Sufrin of Miami, Florida, will spend the year as a teacher in Los Angeles’ YULA Boys High School.

“Working with different informal education programs over the years has inspired me to go into Jewish education,” said Sufrin, who graduated with honors in accounting from YU’s Sy Syms School of Business.

Sufrin and his wife spent their first year of marriage as Av and Aim Bayit (dormitory father and mother) in Yeshivat Reishit Yerushalayim. He has volunteered as director of YUSSR’s Pesach program, Yachad’s ruach [spiritual] coordinator, and had spent three summers in Camp HASC as counselor and division head.

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors during the summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

“I hope to infuse my students with a passion for Judaism while they can still feel comfortable pursuing professional careers,” adds Sufrin, who will be mentored by Rabbi Yitzchak Etshalom, YULA’s director of curriculum.

“I will work with Arye to help him develop his own teaching style and offer him guidance throughout his first year as a teacher,” explained Rabbi Etshalom. “I am confident that he will learn a lot about himself, about education and about the challenges and delights of shaping young minds and hearts.”

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“This grant demonstrates the importance of the work we are doing,” said Joey Small, the Institute’s fellowship coordinator. “By recruiting and supporting these fellows in their initial years of teaching, the grant helps YU nurture the future leaders and practitioners in the field of Jewish education.”

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is open to students from all colleges. Visit the Institute’s Web site at www.yu.edu/azrieli/schoolpartnership for more information or to apply.

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Aug 14, 2009 — Throughout North America, schools in smaller Jewish communities often struggle to find qualified teachers that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is funding five qualified recent college graduates this year—and will fund 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

One of the fellows, Chaya Shochet, will spend the year as a third-grade teacher in her alma mater, Stamford, Connecticut’s Bi-Cultural Day School.

“This is a perfect opportunity to give back to the community and inspire the students the way some of my teachers inspired me,” said Shochet, who graduated from Brandeis University in 2007 with majors in psychology and Hebrew language and literature.

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors during the summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

Shochet decided to become a full-time teacher after substituting at Bi-Cultural Day School for a while. With her husband Matt’s encouragement, Shochet decided to apply for the fellowship. “It is comforting as a new professional to have these resources available as I encounter new and different experiences as an educator.”

Elisheva Kilner, the school’s Jewish Education Coordinator will serve as Shochet’s mentor. “I will be there to answer any of Chaya’s questions, help her with the material and to offer some guidance,” she explained.

Dr. Gerald Kirshenbaum, headmaster at Bi-Cultural Day School, believes that the school’s connection to Yeshiva University is critical. “It is important that our school have a direct link to a major educational institution so that we can continue to foster the professional development of our staff.”

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“This grant demonstrates the importance of the work we are doing,” said Joey Small, the Institute’s fellowship coordinator. “By recruiting and supporting these fellows in their initial years of teaching, the grant helps YU nurture the future leaders and practitioners in the field of Jewish education.”

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is open to students from all colleges. Visit the Institute’s Web site at www.yu.edu/azrieli/schoolpartnership for more information or to apply.

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Aug 14, 2009 — Throughout North America, schools in smaller Jewish communities often struggle to find qualified teachers that will develop the next generation. A new grant from Legacy Heritage Fund Limited will address this problem by providing support to attract, train and retain more high-quality teachers for placement at Jewish day schools.

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is funding five qualified recent college graduates this year—and will fund 20 in total over the next three years—to teach at schools across North America while studying towards master’s degrees at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

“This fellowship will improve the quality of Jewish education by providing training for young talented people interested in making a difference,” said Scott J. Goldberg, PhD, director of YU’s Institute for University-School Partnership, which piloted the program last year.

One of the fellows, Ephraim Ross of Marin County, California, will spend the year as a teacher in Atlanta’s Greenfield Hebrew Academy.

“When I joined the fellowship I was ready to travel,” said Ross, who graduated from Arizona State University with a major in women and gender studies in May 2009. “I wanted to find the perfect school, regardless of the location.”

Legacy Heritage Teacher Fellows will receive a full-tuition scholarship for three summers of coursework culminating in a master of science in education from Azrieli with two years of teaching in the intervening months.

Veteran teachers at the host school will mentor the fellows through classroom observation and weekly meetings. Azrieli faculty will train both the fellows and their mentors during the summer at Yeshiva University, and will provide ongoing support and guidance to the mentors and the fellows throughout the school year.

“This program gives emerging educators a safe opportunity to acquire practical experience that will round out their classroom learning at YU,” said Rabbi Lee Buckman, head of school at Greenfield. “It’s the best of both worlds—theory and practice.”

In addition to the on-site mentoring, the fellows will engage in professional development via conferences and online seminars.

“This grant demonstrates the importance of the work we are doing,” said Joey Small, the Institute’s fellowship coordinator. “By recruiting and supporting these fellows in their initial years of teaching, the grant helps YU nurture the future leaders and practitioners in the field of Jewish education.”

The Legacy Heritage Teacher Training Fellowship is open to students from all colleges. Visit the Institute’s Web site at www.yu.edu/azrieli/schoolpartnership for more information or to apply.

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Donors Ruth and David Gottesman

May 14, 2008 — Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine has received a major gift of $25 million — one of the largest in the college’s 53-year history — from Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman.

The Gottesman gift will support several important research projects at the College of Medicine, most of them to be conducted in the new Michael F. Price Center for Genetic and Translational Medicine/Harold and Muriel Block Research Pavilion, which officially opens in June 2008. The Price Center/Block Research Pavilion is the largest medical research facility to be constructed in the Bronx since Einstein opened in 1955.

Funds from the gift will be allocated as follows: $15 million will be used to establish the Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research; $7 million will fund the Center for Epigenomics, to be headed by Einstein researcher Dr. John Greally; and $3 million will be used to create the Ruth L. Gottesman Clinical Skills Facility in the soon-to-be renovated Van Etten Building, which Einstein has leased from Jacobi Medical Center as part of its overall expansion.

In addition, the gift will support an endowed chair at the Gottesman stem cell institute and a faculty scholar in epigenomics, the study of the vast network of chemical “marks” inside our cells that control the expression of our genes, turning them on and off at certain times and in certain tissues.

It will also enable the college to recruit top-flight faculty that will bolster Einstein’s already prominent leadership in both of these important fields.

“In discussions with the college, we determined that stem cells, epigenomics, and clinical training were areas where we could help make an important contribution, both to Einstein and to the future of biomedical research,” said Dr. Ruth Gottesman, who was elected chair of Einstein’s Board of Overseers in 2007 and is the first woman, and the first former faculty member, to serve in that role. “We want our gift to support endeavors that will position Albert Einstein College of Medicine to excel in both research and medical education, while also attracting the best and brightest to our laboratories and to our classrooms.”

“The Gottesman gift will contribute significantly to Einstein’s already formidable research efforts in stem cell/regenerative medicine research and epigenomics,” said Allen M. Spiegel, MD, the Marilyn and Stanley M. Katz Dean at Einstein. “Additionally, the gift will establish an innovative facility to further enhance the training of future generations of physicians at Einstein, helping them master the clinical skills that will prepare them to be first-rate health care providers.”

Click here to read more about the specific benefits of the gift to Einstein, including the exciting new field of epigenomics.

The $25 million gift is a reflection of the Gottesman’s longstanding affiliation with the college of medicine. In 2002, the couple endowed a professorial chair at Einstein’s Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center in connection with Dr. Gottesman’s life-long interest in helping people with learning disabilities.

Prior to joining the Einstein Board of Overseers in 2002, Dr. Ruth Gottesman had a distinguished 33-year academic career at the medical school, beginning in 1968 when she joined the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center to develop a program for children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities. She went on to serve as the center’s Director of Psychoeducational Services and later as Director of the Adult Literacy Program. In 1999, she became Founding Director of the Fisher Landau Center for the Treatment of Learning Disabilities, a new division of CERC that was established to provide interdisciplinary services to individuals of all ages with learning disabilities.

David Gottesman is the founder and senior managing director of the First Manhattan Company, an investment advisory firm. He was Chairman of the Board of Yeshiva University from 1990 to 1998.

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May 2, 2008 — Yeshiva University’s undergraduate students and alumni now have a resource for meeting other singles through a new initiative of YU’s Center for the Jewish Future. The program, YUConnects, features social activities and Torah events, a Web site, and one-on-one support from couples.

“We are working diligently and sensitively to invite singles to a host of social opportunities where they can feel comfortable connecting and mingling with others,” Efrat Sobolofsky, PhD, mental health advisor of YUConnects, said at the program’s launch, which drew over 200 professional alumni in January .

A group of married men and women, many of whom are alumni of YU schools, play a key role in facilitating and networking. These “connectors,” attend events and meet with members to better understand the qualities they are searching for in a spouse and to facilitate their introduction to other compatible people.

The program distinguishes itself from other dating services that are conducted solely online or over the phone. “The personal face-to-face interaction will create more opportunities for on-target matches,” Rabbi Yosef Kalinsky, the program’s administrator, said. “Our goal and projected success is in the quality of the interactions.”

Dr. David Pelcovitz, the Gwendolyn and Joseph Straus Professor of Jewish Education at Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, plays an instrumental role in training the connectors and is an active advisor to the program.

Activities include interactive events, educational lectures, Shabbat meals hosted across the greater NY/NJ metropolitan area, chesed projects, BBQs, and more.

“YUConnects does a great service to the Jewish community,” said an alumnus who attended the launch. “I have been to various single events before, and my experience with YUConnects thus far has exceeded my expectations.”

YUConnects has the support of the roshei yeshiva (professors of Talmud) at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, a contingent of whom make up an advisory board for the program.

The YUConnects online system was developed in partnership with SawYouAtSinai.com to offer YU singles the opportunity to select an online connector, who will develop a relationship with and perform searches for that member. Becoming a member of the YUConnects online system enables YU undergraduates and alumni to network with other YU singles and provides the option of interacting with the greater SawYouAtSinai.com network.

“In today’s large Jewish world, we are striving to provide a personalized service using the benefits of a technologically advanced and premier online system to link people together,” Dr. Sobolofsky said.

“Using the talents available at Yeshiva, we have created a multi-dimensional approach in our new YU Connects program. I see no more important project that represents our mandate than developing mediums to help singles interested in healthy venues to meet other singles,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, dean of the CJF.

Visit www.yu.edu/cjf/yuconnects to sign up.

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Jan 9, 2008 — Yonatan Frankel, who graduated from Yeshiva College last May, has a heavy workload as a rabbinical student at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary but come the weekend he can often be found traveling to cities such as Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Edmonton, or Calgary. Frankel is the head advisor of Northwest NCSY (formerly the National Conference of Synagogue Youth now known simply by the abbreviation), an organization dedicated to connecting Jewish teens in the United States and Canada with their roots. He sacrifices two weekends a month to extend NCSY’s mission to teenagers in the Northwest because he feels a responsibility to his fellow Jews, so many of whom know little about their own religion.

For over 50 years, Yeshiva University students have formed the core group of young men and women who spend their weekends at NCSY conventions with teenagers exploring all that Judaism has to offer. They travel across North America, often on the eve of midterms and functioning on little sleep, to share their enthusiasm for their heritage. The advisors help run and facilitate the events, but most importantly, they serve as approachable role models who learn, listen, and talk with the teens.

“YU students are perfectly placed for outreach because they can relate to these kids and have the knowledge to teach them,” Frankel said. “If we’re not doing this, then who will?”

Aliza Vishniavsky, a senior at Stern College for Women, echoes Frankel’s feelings. Involved in NCSY since she was in fifth grade, Vishniavsky has been an advisor in the Upper New York region for the past two and a half years. She is currently the region’s chapter coordinator, which involves managing chapter visitations and organizing local events.

“It’s great to see the teens a few times a year at conventions, but nothing compares to seeing them consistently once a month when I go upstate,” said Vishniavsky.

The most rewarding aspect of what she does comes “when I’m hanging out with the girls and they express how much it means to them that I am there for them,” she said. “It makes all the time that I’m giving up totally worth it.”

In recognition of the service of Frankel, Vishniavsky, and the many others like them, Yeshiva University and NCSY hosted a dinner and discussion recently for over 100 YU students who serve as youth advisors.

“The true heroes are the volunteer advisors who work behind the scenes,” said Rabbi Ari Solomont, director of recruitment and outreach for the Mechinah and Basic Jewish Studies programs and a former NCSY regional director himself.

Offering words of support and inspiration to the students were Rabbi Jacob J. Schacter, university professor of Jewish history and Jewish thought and senior scholar at the Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future; Rabbi Steven Burg, international director of NCSY; and President Richard M. Joel.

One of the challenges involved in outreach, said Rabbi Schacter, is recognizing the mindset of today’s youth in a world of endless choice and treasured individuality. “These kids were motivated to come into the room, we need to motivate them to stay, to help them understand the choice that they made and inspire them to continue to make that choice,” Rabbi Schacter said.

President Joel recounted his own experience working with NCSY and in outreach. “This can’t be just about you,” he said. “This is about building Klal Yisrael (the Jewish people). We have to allow people to hear the music of God.”

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Feb 8, 2007 — Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) has developed what is believed to be the first formal program at any rabbinical school in America designed to give rabbis’ wives the opportunity to meet with professionals to discuss issues of self, family, and community in a safe and supportive environment. The second Annual “Rebbetzins’ Yarchei Kallah” program will take place from February 12-14 at Congregation Keter Torah in Teaneck, NJ.

The conference is for wives of rabbis who are participants in the Yarchei Kallah Program which is part of the Legacy Heritage Fund Rabbinic Enrichment Initiative.

Rabbis’ wives face an increasingly complex series of opportunities and challenges in the 21st century. Many seek their own identities while striving to assist their husbands and fill the traditional role of a rabbi’s wife. Until recently, there wasn’t a “road map” that addresses their evolving role and provides them with guidance on how to navigate family and professional responsibilities.

“Rabbis’ wives play a pivotally important role, indeed many roles, in their communities,” said Rabbi Jacob J. Schacter, the internationally prominent rabbi who serves as Senior Scholar of the CJF and is directing this initiative. “Contemporary Orthodox Jews, from rabbis and rabbis’ wives to lay leaders and community members, are sophisticated, intelligent and rooted professionally and culturally in the secular world while living traditional Jewish lives,” said Rabbi Schacter. “We must ensure that they have the tools and guidance necessary to lead these lives creatively and intellectually, now and in the future.”

Over 40 rabbis’ wives, from 32 cities throughout the US and Canada will attend this conference where they will partiicipate in sessions such as “The Blessing and Fulfillment of Being a Rebbetzin,” “Physical and Mental Abuse in Families,” “Raising Healthy Children.” In addition, they will have mentoring sessions in which more experienced rebbetzins will provide insights and respond to questions raised in the sessions.

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