Yeshiva University News » Undergraduate

New Dean’s Scholars Program Offers Medical School Courses to YU Undergrads

With this year’s launch of the Einstein Enrichment Program, Yeshiva University is offering 10 select undergraduates the opportunity to take courses at YU’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

EinsteinEnrichment

Einstein's Dr. Moshe Sadofsky addresses YU undergraduates as part of the Deans' Scholars Program

“The program will entail exposure to our top scientists, independent reading and highly interactive problem-based learning,” said Dr. Edward Burns, executive dean at Einstein and the program’s director. “It is designed to ignite a passion for biomedical science and medicine as it is practiced in the laboratory and clinic today, rather than from textbooks.”

Titled “Deans’ Scholars Program: Frontiers in Biomedical Sciences,” the credited cooperative academic program is being overseen by Dr. Karen Bacon, the Dr. Monique C. Katz dean at Stern College for Women, and Michal Jaff, the Beatrice Diener Presidential Follow. Fall lecture topics included Epochal Moments in Biology, Cells and Organelles, Genetic Material, Enzymes and Metabolism, Cell Communication and Stem Cells, covering material rarely taught to freshmen. In the spring semester, new topics will correlate basic science and clinical entities.

Designed specifically for first time on campus students who are interested in the biomedical sciences, the program meets six Fridays during each semester, and will require abundant involvement from participants, who will meet “very senior, famous scientists and will have to strut their stuff,” said Burns, and have access to state-of-the-art laboratory equipment.

Einstein Enrichment

The program, in its first year, will expand to 20 incoming students next year.

The current cohort of Scholars will continue the program for three more years, with increasing responsibility, independence and exposure as they advance through college. Next year, up to 20 incoming students will be offered spots in the program, “assuming this pilot is a success,” said Dean Bacon.

“This program is a really great opportunity,” said participant Anne Buzzell, of Clayton, NC. “The Einstein professors are highly qualified and give really interesting and smart lectures.”

Charles Lavene, a Yeshiva College participant, said that, although he has already set his sights on attending Einstein, “the program so far has sold me on Einstein even more.”

Buzzell noted that Einstein, too, hopes to benefit from this program. “The Dean mentioned that he hopes to see more undergraduate students take advantage of what Einstein has to offer,” she said.

The administration hopes that this program will prove “a competitive advantage,” for students when applying to medical school, said Dr. Burns. “It will be as useful for getting into Einstein as it would be to get into any other medical school,” he stressed.

The idea for the program first emerged last year, when YU President Richard M. Joel approached Dr. Burns to create a unique initiative “that would tie Einstein to the undergraduate YU programs in such a way to make Yeshiva and Stern Colleges unique in the sciences,” said Dr. Burns. With assistance from Provost Morton Lowengrub, several deans, the YU pre-med advisors and Dr. Victoria Freedman, associate dean for graduate programs in the biomedical sciences, the program was formed.

Although the program is the first of its kind at YU, there are tentative thoughts of expanding the model further. “Based on this experience, we would like to try to develop something similar between the undergraduate schools and our Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law,” said Dean Bacon.

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High School Seniors Get a Firsthand Look at YU’s Academic Excellence and Vibrant Jewish Atmosphere

Hundreds of high school seniors and their parents had the opportunity to learn about Yeshiva University’s unique dual curriculum of an exceptional Jewish Studies program and a first class liberal arts, sciences or business education, at the November 13 undergraduate Open House for men on the Wilf Campus and the November 20 Open House for women on the Beren Campus.

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“Yeshiva University is the preeminent Jewish university in North America, said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, special assistant to the president for undergraduate admissions. “We are set apart by the unique ability to combine Torah study on each student’s individual level with a first-rate secular education and the resources of one of the nation’s top research institutions.”

Prospective students interested in Yeshiva CollegeStern College for Women or SYMS School of Business can learn about the many academic options available in fields ranging from biology, political science and accounting to Jewish studies, philosophy and art. The Open Houses include tours through YU’s libraries and dormitories as well as a chance to meet with deans and faculty.

“Here at YU, a student can be in an environment in which common values are shared, their lives enriched and their successes celebrated,” said Brander.

To arrange a campus tour, learn about financial aid packages available or to apply to Yeshiva University visit www.yu.edu/admissions.

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Thank A Donor Week Offers Students Chance to Recognize Scholarship Support

The week of November 7 marked the first official Thank a Donor Week at Yeshiva University. Organized by the team that oversees stewardship and donor recognition, the week offered students the opportunity to write thank you cards to donors, who make it possible for so many students to attend YU.

Some 75 percent of undergraduates receive scholarship assistance and the average scholarship award exceeds $20,000. In the 2011-2012 academic year, YU has awarded $38 million to its undergraduates. Such support is only possible thanks to the generosity of donors who, despite challenging economic times, know well the value of a YU education and contribute to help students attend Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women and SYMS School of Business, no matter their financial situation.

So far, more than 500 thank you cards have already been signed by grateful students on the Wilf and Beren Campuses.

For more information on how to become involved, please contact 212-960-5376 or DonorRelations@yu.edu.

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New Students Arrive on Campus for Orientation 2011, Prepare to Embark on Their Collegiate Journeys

Following a weekend that saw Hurricane Irene wreak havoc all along the East Coast, more than 600 new students created a different kind of a stir as they arrived at Yeshiva University to begin their college careers.

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Under blue skies and sunshine, students flocked to the Wilf and Beren Campuses on Monday, August 29, wheeling new sheets and lamps to their dormitories in orange bins, meeting undergraduate and University leaders at casual luncheons, and relaxing at newly-installed picnic tables on 185th Street’s pedestrian-only plaza. They came from a wealth of religious traditions and countries around the globe, already thinking of futures in careers and fields across the academic spectrum. However, the beginnings of new friendships were already in evidence.

Josh Cohen, from Columbus, Ohio, and Jack Sztrigler of Mexico City, Mexico, met each other at a pre-season soccer practice last week and are both excited to be part of Yeshiva’s men’s team this year. “I chose YU because, not only is it a great place academically, but we’re getting a good foundation in Jewish values here,” said Cohen, who intends to pursue an accounting degree at the Syms School of Business.

Sztrigler, who is working toward a degree in political science at Yeshiva College, is already looking forward to the year’s first event: Wednesday’s conversation between Senator Joseph Lieberman, the “Shomer Shabbat Senator,” and Rabbi Meir Soloveichik, at the Zahava and Moshael Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought. “I can’t wait for their discussion,” said Sztrigler. “I came here to study politics and it’s fascinating to have someone like that right on campus.”

That interface of Torah Judaism and intellectual growth encapsulates YU’s mission. Speaking to parents of new students in the Nagel Family Atrium, a lounge in the Mendel Gottesman Library, President Richard M. Joel noted that the building was connected to The Glueck Center for Jewish Study, which houses the university’s biggest beit medrash.

“You recognize that these are critical years for your children to have the finest kind of education, where they will explore the different disciplines of life but understand, that to do so, they first must be bnei Torah,” said President Joel. “You’ve chosen to let them do that in an environment where they get to reaffirm, as they are defining themselves for the first time, that the quality existence is a commitment to Torah and Torah values, through which all of G-d’s other ideas are explored.”

President Joel also highlighted a host of renovations and new features around both campuses, including a new Student Life Center on the fifth floor of Stern College for Women’s 215 Lexington Avenue building, a revamped lounge and new café in the Morgenstern Residence Hall, and the introduction of an International Food Bar that will offer alternating Chinese, Indian, Mexican and Israeli Shabbat cuisine.

“I picked Stern for its Jewish environment and the fact that it’s in such a great location,” said Talya Noveck of New Bruswick, New Jersey, who hopes to pursue a nursing degree. “The most interesting part of Orientation so far has been meeting new people—I love my roommates!”

A new resource, Student Life Answers, will be available this year for students with questions—any questions, from “How do I find the right chavrusa? [study partner]” to “Who can I talk to about work-study?” Questions sent to answers@yu.edu will be answered by designated University personnel, drawing on their knowledge of key administrative offices and access to comprehensive information to provide students with the most accurate and complete responses.

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A Message from President Richard M. Joel

We recently announced a series of exciting steps at Yeshiva University to further advance education for our undergraduate students. Our priority is to offer each student in every realm of study the finest education and preparation for their successful future. The crucial next step in our advancement is to create a unified undergraduate faculty. This will allow us to deliver an even better education and, ultimately, better futures for our students and graduates. Faculty unification will also help us streamline the way we deliver student services and create a less cumbersome administrative structure on both undergraduate campuses. We recruited Professor Lawrence Schiffman as Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to work with the faculty and deans to guide this process.

Permit me to focus on the implications of these advancements for our business students.

The Syms School is alive and well and its faculty are key partners in building a stronger undergraduate future. As we move forward in refashioning undergraduate education, our commitment to preparing our business students for successful careers remains a central goal. We will achieve this through a number of steps over the coming period of time:

  • The course offerings and requirements for next year remain unchanged.
  • We proceed energetically to complete our process of accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).
  • The faculty moves forward in strengthening academic offerings and building on all the opportunities that a unified undergraduate faculty will make possible, specifically in economics and mathematics, but in other disciplines as well.
  • We increase cooperation among departments.
  • We emphasize academic and career advisement to business students, focusing even more actively on provision of internships, mentoring, and assistance with job placement.
  • We broaden our programs of alumni involvement in order to increase interaction between Syms alumni and current students.

Throughout this process, we will be working with students and alumni to solicit input and assistance.

Let me summarize the foundational principles that have served to guide us as we embark on the process of reimagining undergraduate education at Yeshiva University:

  • To create a unified undergraduate faculty to better serve our students on the Beren and Wilf campuses.
  • To greatly improve the interaction between faculty of similar disciplines.
  • To create intellectual and academic opportunities to foster greater interdisciplinary collaboration.
  • To provide all the first-rate opportunities presented on each campus to students on both.
  • To reorganize undergraduate faculty to better integrate the business programs, and arts and sciences offerings.
  • To centralize student services and activities to maximize the quality and efficiency of these offerings and to ensure, where appropriate, greater consistency of academic policy.

The bottom line should be clear. Preparation for success in the world of business is a key focus of Yeshiva University’s educational future. Yeshiva University should be a choice destination for the young men and women seeking the finest education in Torah Umadda and positioning themselves for maximum success in business careers. Syms is a proud part of our past and present, and a prouder part of our future.

Richard M. Joel

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Career Development Center Offers Students Opportunities, Resources to Connect with Wide Range of Employers

Two down, two to go.

Sarah Clyde, a Stern College for Women senior graduating in May with a shaped degree in computer science, had four job interviews in the last two weeks. All of them were with employers she met at Yeshiva University’s annual Career Fair, organized by the Career Development Center, on April 1.

CDC Career Fair“The Career Development Center always stresses how networking can get you in the door for an interview,” Clyde said.  “The Career Fair is like a mini-interview and networking event. Once you make that personal connection with the recruiter, you’re more likely to be called in for an interview.”

This year’s Career Fair offered students the opportunity to meet and engage with more than 45 employers across a variety of fields, including medical technology, publishing, Jewish communal work and finance.  According to Sarah Rosen, director of alumni and employment relations at the CDC, that wide range of options is carefully cultivated by the Center throughout the year.

“We try to make this event available to a diverse employer base,” said Rosen. “The diversity is important because we can expose students to employers they may not even realize they would be interested in. The fair gives students the opportunity to hone their skills with different types of employers.” Clyde agreed, offering similar advice to other students: “Don’t only approach the companies you came specifically to see. Take a risk and start a conversation.”

For some employers, the Career Fair was their first encounter with the student body of YU. “This is our first time here and we’re excited,” said Robert Zyzynski, a recruitment intern at the New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board. “We’re looking for students who have open minds because at our agency we really need people who can consider all options. We heard about this recruiting opportunity and we jumped on it.”CDC Career Fair

For others, like Spreemo, a healthcare technology organization, the fair represented the chance to tap a tried-and-true labor market. “I’ve been involved in three businesses in the past that have recruited from YU and always had good experiences,” said Pamela Harpaz, the company’s chief financial officer. “That’s what we’re here for.”

Jared Schuler, a talent acquisition associate for Scholastic, Inc., was similarly impressed by a current public relations intern at the company who is a student at Stern College. Her work at Scholastic has made the publisher interested to learn more about the student population at YU. “It’s our first time one-on-one with this school,” said Schuler. “We wanted to come and see what they’ve got.”

The CDC prepared students for the fair with informational materials and workshops about revising resumes and the art of the personal pitch. Jonathan Scheiner, a senior studying Management of Information Systems at the Sy Syms School of Business, thought that both discussions helped him present himself more effectively. “I think the companies I spoke with today were very receptive to my pitch, and I think looking them in the eyes and smiling was a big part of that,” he said.

Clyde is already on her way. However, she will continue to seek the guidance and feedback of the CDC as she advances her job search. “The CDC has years of experience dealing with both students and employers,” she said. “They know what employers might and ask and where students fumble on interviews. It can only help to sit down and have a conversation with an advisor.”

To learn more about the Career Development Center at Yeshiva University visit www.yu.edu/cdc.

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Six Selected to Participate in Kressel Research Scholarship Program, Now in its Third Year

2010 Kressel Research Scholars

Six Yeshiva University students will intensify their focus on advanced undergraduate-level research this year as part of the Henry Kressel Research Scholarship program. The scholarship—established by Dr. Henry Kressel, chairman of the YU Board of Trustees, managing director of Warburg Pincus LLC and a Yeshiva College graduate—offers students the unique opportunity to craft a year-long intensive research project under the direct supervision of University faculty.

“This is the third year of the program and I am delighted with the achievement of the scholars,” said Dr. Kressel. “Our goal was to provide the opportunity for promising students to perform creative research with our outstanding faculty. Not only have these students gone on to excellent graduate and professional schools, but they have also received prestigious fellowships, including our first everCarnegie and Fulbright Fellowships, as well as a National Science Fellowship.”

This year’s recipients are Joseph Attias, a philosophy major; Or Pikary, accounting; Ben Rosenzweig, psychology; Michael Turkel, English; and physics majors Dassi Shulman and Aaron Yevick.

The students’ research, each conducted under the mentorship of a faculty member, will focus on a variety of subjects.

Shulman will be mentored by Dr. Emil Prodan, assistant professor of physics at Stern College for Women, and will explore several fundamental aspects of a recently discovered state of matter called the topological insulating state.

“Having access to high-tech science facilities where I can pursue my physics and engineering studies and research opportunities such as the Kressel Scholarship has enabled me to develop my understanding and love of science and propel me forward in my career,” said Shulman, who hopes to pursue a career in structural engineering.

Pikary, the first Sy Syms School of Business student to be awarded the scholarship, will be conducting his research under the guidance of Dr. Joseph Kerstein, associate professor of accounting at Sy Syms.

“Through Yeshiva University’s strong offering of both Judaic and secular education, I’ve been able to grow both academically and as a Jew with strong ethical values that can better society,” said Pikary. “I have therefore become particularly interested in researching what types of corporate governance are associated with firms who choose to act ethically to meet their responsibilities under SEC disclosure rules.”

The scholars will each receive a stipend of $7,500 for the year, along with travel money and appropriate research-support expenses. Following their research tenure, Kressel Scholars will present their work to the student body to stimulate a larger intellectual discussion on their topics.

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Ambitious Students Prepare to Embark on Their Yeshiva University Journey

More than 600 men and women from all corners of the world flooded Yeshiva University’s Wilf and Beren campuses this week to begin their undergraduate study at the only institution that promises to enrich both their secular and spiritual knowledge.

Hailing from more than a dozen countries as far as India and Panama and states across the country, these students were drawn to YU by its unique mission, articulated by President Richard M. Joel in his opening address to new Yeshiva College students at an orientation barbeque. “A lot of young people today ask, ‘Do I matter?’ ” President Joel said. “I believe you’ve come to a makom [place] where together, individually and collectively, we can build worlds. Here, living by Torah values, you can equip yourselves to be great talmedei chachumim [Torah scholars], great scientists, great poets, great teachers…you can advance the sacred story of our people: G-d’s partnership with Avraham and Avraham’s partnership with G-d.”

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This year’s Orientation was jam-packed with vibrant and exciting events. New students on the Beren Campus got acquainted with club leaders at a “Chillin & Grillin” barbeque, engaged in chavruta learning at the new Lea and Leon Eisenberg Beit Midrash in Stanton Hall and explored New York City’s rich cultural offerings on a walking tour of the Brooklyn Bridge. Students on the Wilf Campus shared high tea with their new faculty mentors and heard about engaging opportunities to contribute to the global Jewish community from members of the University’s Center for the Jewish Future. And there’s always room for sheer fun: along with their counterparts at Stern College for Women, first-year students headed to New Roc City for a night of bowling, laser-tag and arcade games.

The excitement and ambition of these new beginnings is palpable. For Aliza Loshinsky of Brooklyn, NY, Stern College was the perfect place to cultivate her talents and interests while maintaining a strong connection to the Jewish community. “I hope to be able to use this opportunity to learn more and grow in my Judaism and to develop my strengths in a way that will benefit my family, my people and the world,” she said. Loshinsky is considering psychology as a major.

Davida Kollmar of Edison, NJ, felt drawn to the warm atmosphere fostered at Stern College. “I was impressed by the individual attention given to each student to help her achieve her goals,” she said. She intends to pursue a degree in math or science.

Shlomo Weissberg of Chicago, IL, wanted the opportunity to meet students from a wide range of backgrounds and Jewish traditions in a friendly environment. Hoping to major in accounting at Sy Syms School of Business, he is also excited to engage the learning community at YU. “The new beit midrash is really gorgeous,” he said.

Entering the college arena can be overwhelming. Yet Brad Karasik, associate dean of students at Yeshiva College, urged new students not to be afraid to dive in. “It’s your campus,” he said. “There are so many things waiting for you to take charge of and become active in. Student clubs range from academic interests to Israel advocacy to chessed [volunteer] opportunities and we have hundreds of students on campus for Shabbat every week. The atmosphere here is incredible.”

Zelda Braun, associate dean of students at Stern College, agreed. “Be open to new experiences, to meeting new people, to exploring new areas of interest,” she said. “You have a world of opportunity available to you.”

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New Teaching Fellowship Program Allows Honors Students to Serve as Teaching Assistants

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Jonathan Schwab is a member of the teaching fellowship program’s inaugural cohort.

This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

This fall, the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program will offer senior honor students and newcomers alike a rare opportunity: to mentor and be mentored by their own.

Dr. Gabriel Cwilich, director of the Honors Program, has announced a new teaching fellowship program in which senior honors students in the process of writing their final theses are assigned to select courses that typically enroll a high number of incoming honors students. As teaching assistants, seniors will help professors flesh out courses and curriculums in addition to coordinating supplementary extracurricular activities and holding review sessions or tutoring individual students, depending on the course’s requirements.

“The student acts as a teaching assistant,” Cwilich explained, “but at the same time, he acts as a role model for incoming freshmen and is able to share with them insights into the process of writing a thesis and discuss his particular research.”

The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.The student-initiated program has several objectives. By providing faculty with enthusiastic and motivated teaching assistants, the program aims to develop more comprehensive courses whose activities expand beyond the classroom. The program will also forge a critical connection between upper and lower classmen, as new honors students will have the chance to observe seniors in the final stages of the thesis-writing process and share experiences with upper classmen who have recently been in their place.

The program is equally valuable for the senior honors students, many of whom intend to pursue graduate study. “To be on the ‘other side’ of the instructor’s desk is a rare opportunity that I think will not only help my studies this year but hopefully give me a deeper understanding of collegiate education as a whole—a perfect culmination to my four years here,” said Jonathan Schwab ’11 YC, a member of the program’s inaugural cohort and the Honors Student Council, who proposed the idea to the Honors Steering Committee last year. He will be assigned to Dr. David Lavinsky’s Conversion and Religious Identities in Medieval Literature class.

For the program’s first year, teaching fellows have been assigned to eight courses, including Freshman Honors Seminar in Art and Literature in the Age of Photography, Freshman Honors Seminar in Reading Medicine and General Honors Physics.

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Jun 30, 2010 — Dr. Marina Holz, assistant professor of biology at Stern College for Women, has received an NIH Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) R15 grant for identification and characterization of S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) targets in mammary cell proliferation. S6K1 is a therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

Holz’s research will attempt to provide a comprehensive assessment of the therapeutic potential of the S6K1 signaling pathway by identifying and characterizing downstream effectors of the S6K1 pathway in breast cancer cells.

“Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women,” explained Holz. “Current chemotherapies are indiscriminate, have toxic side effects and, in about half of the patients, do not prevent cancer progression or recurrence. We are hoping to identify new therapeutic targets against which new chemotherapy agents could be developed. These new drugs could be then used in the clinic in combination with other regiments to achieve greater response.”

The AREA grant, supported by funds provided to the National Institutes of Health under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009, supports small research projects in the biomedical and behavioral sciences conducted by faculty and students. The funds provided by this grant—totaling $408,000 over three years—will be used to support student research during the academic year and the summer semester in Holz’s lab.

This summer, Stern College students Faygel Beren, Miriam Steinberger and Tirtza Speigel, as well as research fellow Myriam Maruani ’09S, will work in the Holz lab on this and various other projects.

“This award represents an historic milestone for YU,” said Holz. “Receiving an NIH grant is a rite of passage for most biomedical researchers. I view this as a validation that the research environment at YU is nationally competitive and on par with the best research colleges.”

A resident of Greenwich, CT, Dr. Holz has supervised undergraduate honors projects at Stern since 2007. She received her PhD from Harvard Medical School.

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