Yeshiva University News » Women

Jul 1, 2009 — Yeshiva University, through its Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), will introduce a Torah learning program at Lincoln Square Synagogue this summer for women of all ages who want to pursue advanced Talmud and Judaic study. The Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program, which takes place July 6-29, affirms the University’s status as a pioneer in developing Orthodox Jewish women as scholars, teachers and community leaders.

The program, focusing on “Crisis, Hope and Leadership in Jewish Tradition,” will provide women of all ages and Jewish educational backgrounds with the knowledge and tools to become Judaic scholars, community leaders and role models for the Orthodox community.

See The Jewish Channel’s coverage of the program here:



The program is a component of the CJF’s annual Manhattan Beit Midrash Community Program, which has offerings for men, women and youth at Lincoln Square Synagogue.

Highlighting this year’s Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program will be a mini-course on Mondays and Wednesdays led by Elana Stein Hain, who completed advanced studies in Talmud at YU’s Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies (GPATS) and is the community scholar at Lincoln Square Synagogue, the first woman to hold such a position at the prominent New York house of worship. The position is sponsored by the CJF.

Hain’s mini-course, “Chabura: Sugya Survey Workshop,” will focus on a sampling of sugyot [Mishnaic texts] which are ripe for both the yeshiva/Brisker (Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik) method as well as academic perspectives. The workshop will include 30 minutes of chavruta [group study] helping participants develop and sharpen their learning skills.

“Women are partners in the leadership of the Jewish community,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner Dean of the CJF. “What this program does is provide the tools for them to grow intellectually and develop the knowledge necessary to take on this role. It’s an outgrowth of our commitment to women’s leadership and Jewish education that dates back 40 years to the founding of Stern College for Women, the Midreshet Yom Rishon held weekly on campus, the GPATS program and numerous leadership fellowships for women.”

In addition to Hain, the faculty for the Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program includes Rabbi Moshe Kahn, a faculty member of Stern College, the GPATS program, and the Drisha Institute, who will address “The Call of the Shofar: A Halakhic Analysis” on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays; and Dr. Shawn Zelig Aster, assistant professor of Bible at Yeshiva College, who will focus on “Sefer Yeshayahu: Text and History” on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. In addition, Rabbi Brander will give a special shiur [lecture] on “Justice, Human Rights and Morality: The Ethics of Warfare” on Tuesday, July 14 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

For adults of all ages, there is a rotating scholar series on Tuesday evenings, a three-week course on Wednesdays, July 8, 15 and 22, and a morning program. Among the faculty will be Rabbi Hayyim Angel of Congregation Shearith Israel of New York and instructor at Yeshiva College; Yael Leibowitz, an adjunct professor at Stern College; Rebbetzin Smadar Rosensweig, professor of Bible at Stern College; Dapha Fishman Secunda, director of women’s programming at the CJF; Dr. Shai Secunda, the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Postdoctoral Fellow in Judaic Studies at Yale University; Rabbi Dr. Jacob J. Schacter, University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought and senior scholar at the CJF; and Rabbi Dr. Jeffrey Woolf, senior lecturer in Talmud at Bar-Ilan University.

Among the topics they will address are: “Jeremiah’s Confrontation with the Religious Establishment”; “Maimonides’ Analysis of Sefer Iyov”; “Yehudah and David”; “Theological Reflections of National Suffering”; “Interactions between Judaism, Islam, and Christianity”; “Reflections on Tisha B’Av”: “Our Patriarch Avraham”; and “Notes from the Destruction in Eichah Rabbah.”

For more information on YU summer programs or to register, please contact DFishma2@yu.edu or call 212.340.7700 x 430.

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Jun 30, 2009 — Affirming its status as a pioneer in advanced Talmud and Judaic study for women and its four decade long commitment to developing Orthodox Jewish women as scholars, teachers, and community leaders, Yeshiva University, through its Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), will sponsor the Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program next month.

The program, “Crisis, Hope and Leadership in Jewish Tradition,” which will take place at Lincoln Square Synagogue, 200 Amsterdam Avenue, from July 6 to July 29, is designed to provide women of all ages and Jewish educational backgrounds with the knowledge and tools to become Judaic scholars, community leaders, and role models for the Orthodox community.

The program is a component of the CJF’s annual Manhattan Beit Midrash Community Program, which has offerings for men, women and youth at Lincoln Square Synagogue.

Highlighting this year’s Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program will be a mini-course on Mondays and Wednesdays led by Elana Stein Hain, who completed advanced studies in Talmud at YU’s Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies (GPATS) and current Community Scholar at Lincoln Square Synagogue, the first woman to hold such a position at the prominent New York house of worship. The position is sponsored by the CJF.

Hain’s mini-course, “Chabura: Sugya Survey Workshop,” will focus on a sampling of sugyot (Mishnaic texts) which are ripe for both the yeshiva/Brisker (Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik) method as well as academic perspectives. The workshop will include 30 minutes of chavruta (group study) helping participants develop and sharpen their learning skills.

“Women are partners in the leadership of the Jewish community,” said Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the David Mitzner Dean of the CJF. “What this program does is provide the tools for them to grow intellectually and develop the knowledge necessary to take on this role. It’s an outgrowth of our commitment to women’s leadership and Jewish education that dates back 40 years to the founding of Stern College for Women, the Midreshet Yom Rishon held weekly on the YU campus, the GPATS program and numerous leadership fellowships for women.”

In addition to Hain, the faculty for the Women’s Beit Midrash Fellows Program includes Rabbi Moshe Kahn, a faculty member of Stern College, the GPATS program, and the Drisha Institute, who will address the “The Call of the Shofar: A Halakhic Analysis” on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays; and Dr. Shawn Zelig Aster, an Assistant Professor of Bible at Yeshiva College, who will focus on “Sefer Yeshayahu: Text and History” on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. In addition, Rabbi Brander will give a special shiur on “Justice, Human Rights and Morality: The Ethics of Warfare” on Tuesday, July 14 from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

“I am thrilled to be part of this progressive program,” said Ms. Hain. It gives me great satisfaction to help foster a vibrant environment of leadership and learning for women of all ages who, like me, have a deep interest in becoming scholars and role models within their community.”

For adults of all ages, there is a rotating scholar series on Tuesday evenings, a three-week course on Wednesdays, July 8, 15 and 22, and a morning program. Among the faculty will be Rabbi Hayyim Angel of Congregation Shearith Israel of New York and instructor at Yeshiva College; Yael Leibowitz, an adjunct professor at Stern College; Rebbetzin Smadar Rosensweig, professor of Bible at Stern College; Dapha Fishman Secunda, director of women’s programming at the CJF; Dr. Shai Secunda, the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Postdoctoral Fellow in Judaic Studies at Yale University; Rabbi Dr. Jacob J. Schacter, University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought and Senior Scholar at the CJF; and Rabbi Dr. Jeffrey Woolf, senior lecturer in Talmud at Bar-Ilan University.

Among the topics they will address are: “Jeremiah’s Confrontation with the Religious Establishment”; “Maimonides’ Analysis of Sefer Iyov”; “Yehudah and David”; “Theological Reflections of National Suffering”; “Interactions between Judaism, Islam, and Christianity”; “Reflections on Tisha B’Av”: “Our Patriarch Avraham”; and “Notes from the Destruction in Eichah Rabbah.”

For more information on YU summer programs or to register, please contact DFishma2@yu.edu or call 212.340.7700 x430.

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Study co-author Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and population health at Einstein.

Feb 26, 2009 — Women who have more years of fertility (the time from first menstruation to menopause) have a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease than women with fewer years, according to a large new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

“These findings, involving nearly 74,000 women, suggest that longer exposure to the body’s own, or endogenous, hormones, including estrogen, may help protect the brain cells that are affected by Parkinson’s disease,” says lead author Rachel Saunders-Pullman, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., assistant professor of neurology at Einstein and attending physician in neurology at Beth Israel Medical Center, an affiliate of Einstein’s in Manhattan.

An abstract of the study was released by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). Further study details will be presented at AAN’s 61st annual meeting in Seattle, April 25 – May 2.

After Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease. About 1.5 million Americans currently have Parkinson’s, characterized by symptoms that can include tremor (shaking), slowness of movement, rigidity (stiffness) and difficulty with balance. The condition typically develops after the age of 60, although 15 percent of those diagnosed are under 50. There is no cure for Parkinson’s, although medications or surgery can ease symptoms of the disease.

Parkinson’s disease is almost twice as common in men as in women, and researchers have long hypothesized that sex hormones might play a role in the disease.

In the current study, researchers analyzed the records of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study and focused on those women who developed Parkinson’s disease. The study involved about 73,973 women who underwent natural menopause.

The study found that women who had a fertile lifespan of more than 39 years had about a 25 percent lower risk of developing Parkinson’s compared with women who had a fertile lifespan shorter than 33 years.

In addition, the data showed that women who had four or more pregnancies were about 20 percent more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than were women who had three or fewer pregnancies. “One explanation for this finding is that the post-partum period, which is typically one with lower levels of estrogen, subtracts from a woman’s total fertile lifespan,” says co-author Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and population health and the principal investigator of the WHI study at Einstein.

“Overall, our findings might lead one to assume that hormone therapy would make sense as a neuroprotective agent,” says Dr. Saunders-Pullman. “However, we also found that women who were taking hormone therapy did not have a lower risk for Parkinson’s. Thus, our data does not support a role for treatment with exogenous hormones, that is, hormones that originate outside the body, to prevent Parkinson’s.”

In fact, hormone therapy can have harmful neurological effects. “Earlier studies in the Women’s Health Initiative demonstrated that hormone therapy increases one’s risk for both stroke and dementia,” says Dr. Wassertheil-Smoller. “Clearly, we need to conduct more research into estrogen’s effects on the brain.”

The study was supported by the Thomas Hartman Foundation for Parkinson’s Research and the National Institutes of Health.

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Jan 21, 2009 — The grand ballroom of Jerusalem’s Ramada Hotel was awash in sopranos and altos on the evening of Jan. 17, as thousands of young women gathered for the 11th Annual Kol Chatan v’Kol Kallah Inter-Seminary Choir Competition, co-sponsored by Yeshiva University and the social action group Kedma.

The competition has grown exponentially in the last decade, from an informal contest in a coffee house to a much-anticipated bonanza in which groups from 16 different religious programs for post-high school young women each present a five-minute song (and, usually, dance) presentation.

This year, the songs revolved around the themes of “Land of Israel” and “Weddings.” More than 2,000 girls and women from all over Israel came to enjoy the show, which is judged by a panel of 18, one woman from each seminary and two representing YU.

Proceeds from the event were donated to a fund for needy brides, administered by Rabbanit Bracha Kapach, who was awarded the Israel Prize for her extensive work in assisting the poor. Even before the ticket booth opened at the competition, advance sales had exceeded 40,000 shekels.

“We want to make a statement,” said Danielle Sacks, a choir singer from Midreshet Lindenbaum, before the contest started. “We worked hard together, we’re having a great time and we’re gonna sing our hearts out.”

Ayala Maurer, a London native learning at Sha’alvim for Women, said that her entire school had been preparing for this event for three months, noting that non-choir members helped create costumes and posters to raise school spirit. “Being from London, I didn’t know so much about YU,” Maurer said. “I see it’s a great organization that does good things. Everyone here is going to Stern!”

Those who are planning to attend YU next year indeed expressed pride that the University was supporting the competition.

School spirit, though, was focused entirely on the seminaries, and high-pitched chants of “Michlalah! Michlalah!” and “MMY! MMY!” filled the auditorium whenever there was a break in activities. In welcoming the students, President Richard M. Joel joked, “There is no man on the face of the earth more intimidated than I am right now.”

He also acknowledged that war was raging in Gaza and Southern Israel, telling the all-female audience, “As soldiers are fighting, as people are in pain and in fear, we are not ignoring that. Our singing is what is possible because they care about our futures and are working to protect it.”

Dr. Karen Bacon, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean of Stern, also addressed the students. “This event represents the unleashing of the creative energies of Jewish women in the name of chesed [loving kindness], medinat Yisrael [the State of Israel] and Jewish unity,” Dean Bacon said. “This year is so special for all of you, and I know you’ll want to continue the type of relationships you have here with Israel and with Torah. At YU, that relationship is very firm.”

The first-place prize went to Midreshet Harova, whose cast of 49 young women, including 41 singers, wove together songs by Matisyahu and Blue Fringe with Israeli flag movements, a dvar Torah and costumes evocative of the Old City’s Jewish Quarter – including two students dressed as cats. Their theme was “If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem.”

The Tomer Devorah seminary and Michlalah won the 2nd and 3rd place awards, respectively. The performance by Tomer Devorah combined strong vocals, gymnastics and synchronized dance moves with songs and monologues emphasizing Jews’ strength despite tragedies throughout history. The Michlalah students featured strong, soulful soloists and a performance that included gymnastics and a message on the importance of reveling in the values of our own culture.

Darchei Binah won a special mention for raising the most funds for Rabbanit Kapach’s wedding fund.

Other participating seminaries were Midreshet Yeud; Midreshet AMIT; Bnot Torah Institute (Sharfman’s); Tiferet; Machon Maayan; Midreshet Tehilla; Midreshet Lindenbaum; MMY; Midreshet Moriah, Nishmat; Sha’alvim for Women; and Baer Miriam.

Overall, the choir competition proved to be “one more example of how we can channel the talents and strengths of these young women in a way that combines fun, chesed, creativity and Torah values,” said Stephanie Strauss, assistant director of Yeshiva University’s S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program. “It allows the students to work as a team and to express their Judaism through song and dance – just as they will have opportunities to do if they choose to attend Yeshiva University.”

“This event shows that YU is involved in the lives of students in Israel,” said Shira Preil, who is studying at Michlalah on her way to the Stern College Honors Program next fall. “They brought us together to have fun and do a mitzvah.”

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Tzivya Block became the first YU women’s volleyball player named the HVWAC Rookie of the Week.

Nov 5, 2008 — This fall Yeshiva University’s Lady Macs volleyball team began its inaugural season as the sixth women’s varsity team at YU. The team made the quarterfinals of the Hudson Valley Women’s Athletic Conference (HVWAC), after a 17-match schedule against the six other colleges in the conference, and several non-conference matches as well.

The team, in its second year of competition, was elevated to varsity status after last year’s truncated season as a club team, in the exploratory phase to test the talent and dedication of the team members.

Michael Spinner, associate director of athletics and sports information director, praised the team for exceeding everyone’s expectations in their first season. Against a schedule comprised of established varsity programs with significantly more experience, the team finished the season with a 2-14 record with most of the losses going right down to the wire.

“They have been extremely competitive in most of their match-ups and very impressive as a team,” Spinner said.

After leading YU to its first win of the season, Stern College junior Tzivya Block became the first Yeshiva University women’s volleyball player named the HVWAC Rookie of the Week, which is awarded to the most accomplished first-year player from any of the seven teams in the conference.

Ecstatic about her award, Block acknowledged the support of her team mates. “Volleyball, unlike some sports, requires teamwork” said Block, whose twin sister, Nili, was named Co-Rookie of the Week. “We all had to work together. Whether it was passing the ball to each other during a play or communicating on the court, we always had each others’ back.”

In the past three years, Yeshiva University’s Athletic Department has successfully doubled their offerings for students at the Beren Campus. While the expansion of women’s varsity-level sports was originally planned to take five years, the dedication and interest of the women enabled the department to achieve the plan in shorter time, said Joe Bednarsh, director of athletics.

Volleyball now joins basketball, tennis, soccer, cross country and fencing as a women’s varsity program with a team of 15 members made up of freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors.

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Dr Lea Santos

Sep 12, 2008 — Dr. Lea Ferreira dos Santos, an assistant professor of physics at Yeshiva University’s (YU) Stern College for Women, will represent the United States at the third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP). The conference, which was established to address the severe underrepresentation of women in the field of physics, will be held in Seoul, Korea on October 8-10. Dr. Santos was selected from a group of over 70 applicants to join the US delegation at the conference.

“This will be an excellent opportunity for members of our department to learn from our own colleague how universities worldwide solve the multiple challenges toward increasing the representation of women in physics,” said Professor Anatoly Frenkel, head of the physics department at Stern College.

Growing up in Brazil, where she attended the University of Sao Paulo and earned her PhD, Dr. Santos remembers feeling somewhat isolated, as a woman, in her science classes. “However, it wasn’t until I came to the US and was exposed to discussions about women in science that I realized the depth of the social problem behind the small numbers,” she says. “Discussions are essential to creating awareness, which eventually leads to changes.”

According to the conference’s Web site, ICWIP “is dedicated to providing an opportunity to share the scientific accomplishments of participants as well as analyzing international progress in promoting women in physics.” The conference will consist of lectures by prominent international women physicists, workshops, and poster presentations on gender in physics and scientific work.

“In a very short time, Dr. Santos has established impressive scientific productivity in her research of theoretical physics (quantum many-body systems),” added Dr. Frenkel. “She has also quickly established herself as an excellent teacher and mentor.”

Dr. Santos has been instrumental in advancing the relatively new physics program at Stern; she developed several new innovative courses and has attracted a number of students to her research group. Being the only female faculty member in the department, Dr. Santos understands the profound influence she has on the young women in her classes. “I became convinced that my contribution to science would come from two realms, as a researcher and as a role model to female students.”

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: the Wilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.
# # #

Visit the YU Web site at www.yu.edu.

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May 1, 2008 — A select group of nine Stern College for Women students were inducted into Psi Chi, the National Honors Society in Psychology, in April.

Stern College junior Rochelle Sonenberg said she was honored to be admitted to the society, which accepts psychology majors or minors with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and who are in the top third of their class. “There aren’t too many people inducted, and I’m proud to be a part of it,” Sonenberg said.

Besides the prestige, Psi Chi offers students opportunities to participate in the society’s lectures and conferences, and possibilities for furthering their research.

“Students should take this as an opportunity to become involved in activities outside the classroom,” said Joshua Bacon, PhD, associate professor of psychology and faculty advisor to Psi Chi, in his address at the induction ceremony. “This is your opportunity to take the initiative and make things happen. Make this a vibrant part of the Psychology Club and of Stern College.”

“I’m really excited to be inducted into Psi Chi,” senior Ophira Kopitnikoff said. As for achieving and maintaining the requisite GPA, Kopitnikoff said, “I feel like my hard work has paid off.”

Other students who were inducted were Aviva Bellman, Jeana Beneson, Allison Bindiger, Dana Faleck, Elise Glaser, Rina Kellerman, and Michelle Lasky.

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Nov 19, 2007 — When the only “complaint” conference organizers receive is that a gathering is not long enough, program chairs know they’re doing something right.

More than 100 women attended a recent conference that sought to provide a wide range of resources to the women who teach premarital classes to observant Jewish brides and educate them about issues of sexuality relevant to this instruction. Kallah teachers meet with brides for several sessions before their wedding day to teach them the laws of Taharat HaMishpacha (Jewish family purity).

With 89 attendees on site – and an additional 22 women participating through videoconference from Baltimore and from YU’s Gruss Institute in Jerusalem—the gathering, “Creating Healthy Expectations in our Kallot,” brought together teachers from diverse backgrounds and of mixed ages, as well as nurses, therapists, and social workers.

Participants included kallah teachers from the Chassidic, Sephardic, and Modern Orthodox communities, prompting Rosenfeld to point out that Tzelem, a special project of YU’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), clearly serves as a “unifying” force in the Jewish community.

“The diversity at the conference was incredible to see,” says Rosenfeld, noting that some 30 percent of the attendees were women who would otherwise have no occasion to come to Yeshiva University. “But this conference—and the cause of better preparing young women for marriage–united women who otherwise travel in different worlds.”

Keynoting the conference, co-chaired by Abby Lerner and Peshi Neuburger, was speaker Marilyn Freedman, founder and director of Essential Physical Therapy in Great Neck, N.Y. Her presentation, “Transitioning into Marriage: Body Awareness and Comfort with Intimacy,” included exercises and practical suggestions kallah teachers can give students to make them feel more comfortable with their bodies.

“Many women gathered to ask her individual questions,” says Rosenfeld, noting that a prominent rebbetzin who has been teaching kallot for more than 20 years had already referred someone to the speaker. “She said that if only for that, the program was worth it, since if you help one person, you’ve changed the world.”

Leading the small group sessions in the afternoon were Dr. Sara Barris, who discussed “Niddah and Communication in the Marital Relationship; Dr. Martin Grajower, who spoke on options for avoiding huppah niddah; and Rabbi Kenneth Auman, who led an “Ask the Rabbi” session. In addition, co-chair Peshi Neuburger led text study on the issue of harchakot.

Tzelem is a perfect example of what YU is all about,” says Rabbi Kenneth Brander, CJF dean. “Through conferences such as this, not only does Tzelem harness the religious energy and Torah knowledge of Yeshiva University, it also taps into our ability to convene leaders in mental health and to make a real difference in the community.”

“This helps us build community in a very unique way,” says Rabbi Brander, and it also “helps inform sensitive issues sharing the Torah vision on matters such as intimacy.”

As part of this initiative, the CJF is incubating a curriculum, now being piloted in two yeshiva day schools, to educate students in the areas of interpersonal relationships, sexuality, intimacy, and the Jewish values that inform those areas. In addition, the university is offering chattan classes as well as specialized training for rabbis and mental health professionals.

Tzelem serves the Orthodox community in developing religiously sensitive resources and educational programming in the broad areas of intimacy and relationships for different constituents and operates with the backing of rabbis, educators, and mental health professionals within the Orthodox community.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: theWilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts, science, math and business courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

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Visit the YU Website at www.yu.edu

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Nov 13, 2007
Yeshiva University
Department of Athletics and Physical Education

500 West 185th Street New York, NY 10033 (212) 960-5211 www.yu.edu/athletics

Contact: Michael Spinner – Sports Information Director
(212) 960-0042 – phone
(212) 960-0088 – fax
mspinner@yu.edu

For Immediate Release
November 13, 2007

YU honored after successful first season of Skyline Conference competition

(New York, NY) – A successful first season of Skyline Conference competition for the Yeshiva University Women’s Tennis team has resulted in significant post-season recognition as sophomore Stephanie Kimmel (Allentown, PA/Yeshiva Flatbush) was voted First Team All-Conference, and Yeshiva was awarded the Skyline Conference Sportsmanship Award for Women’s Tennis. Both awards were based solely on the votes of the Head Women’s Tennis Coaches within the Skyline Conference.

“This is a very proud moment for the Yeshiva University Athletics Department, and one of the most exciting announcements we have had this season for our women’s athletics program,” said Yeshiva University Director of Athletics, Mr. Joseph Bednarsh. “To have a student-athlete recognized as one of the very best in the Skyline Conference, and for our team to be rewarded for displaying the highest level of sportsmanship is the perfect example of what we are aspiring for department-wide. We hope for all of our athletes to compete at the highest possible level, but it is of paramount importance for our student-athletes and coaches to exhibit sportsmanship at all times, and to represent our institution with a level of maturity and professionalism that will give Yeshiva University a great name in athletics competition. To be recognized for both at the same time is just incredible, and I am very proud of every member of our Women’s Tennis team, and our terrific Head Coach who just completed his first season at Yeshiva.”

Kimmel, a biology major, who studied in seminary in Israel during her freshman year, emerged as one of the best rookies in the Skyline Conference during the 2007 season. While competing at first singles, Kimmel finished the fall season with a 7-3 record, including a 6-1 record during her last seven matches as she squared off with the best individual player each opponent had to offer. She also compiled a 7-3 record as a member of Yeshiva’s first doubles team. Twice during the fall season, Kimmel was named to the Skyline Conference Honor Roll for our outstanding play during the year.

As a team, Yeshiva finished the fall season with a 2-8 overall record, including a 1-7 mark in Skyline Conference competition under the guidance of first year Head Coach Roger Crawford. However, the season was Yeshiva’s first in the Skyline Conference, and four of the conference matches could have gone either way. Yeshiva will continue competition early in 2008 when they compete during a spring Women’s Tennis season for the first time.

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Oct 24, 2007 — The Yeshiva University Women’s Organization (YUWO) will celebrate its 62nd Annual Opera Benefit and Silver Anniversary Aprés Opera Gala on Saturday evening, November 10, 2007, at Lincoln Center in New York City.

Major supporters and members of the YUWO’s President Society for Torah Chesed will be honored at a gala buffet dinner in the Grand Promenade of the New York State Theater, following a performance at 8 p.m. by the New York City Opera of Massenet’s “Cendrillon” (Cinderella in French with English subtitles). The President’s Society for Torah Chesed assists Yeshiva University students through its Torah Chesed Fund, scholarships, and deserving projects.

Dinah Pinczower serves as national chairman of the board of the YUWO and she is also the founder of the Aprés Opera Gala. Inge Rennert serves as Opera Gala Advisory Chair. Jean Lindenbaum, Beatrice Peyser, Sydelle Slochowsky, and Alice Goldberg Usdan are Opera Gala co-chairmen; associate co-chairs are Dr. Derek Enlander and Denise and Michael Mandelbaum. Esther Joel, Mindy Lamm, and Dinah Pinczower serve as co-chairs of the President’s Society for Torah Chesed. Harriet Muss, Rebecca Steindecker, and the late Caron Enlander form the YUWO’s Presidium.

For reservations or information, please call the YUWO office at 212-960-0855.

Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University brings together the heritage of Western civilization and the ancient traditions of Jewish law and life. More than 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students study at YU’s four New York City campuses: theWilf Campus, Israel Henry Beren Campus, Brookdale Center, and Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus. YU’s three undergraduate schools –– Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Sy Syms School of Business ––– offer a unique dual program comprised of Jewish studies and liberal arts courses. Its graduate and affiliate schools include Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, and Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. YU is ranked among the nation’s leading academic research institutions.

Visit http://www.yu.edu

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