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Rabbi Michael Taubes Named Head of School at Yeshiva University High School for Boys

Rabbi Michael Taubes, an educator with more than three decades of experience in Jewish education and administration, has been named rosh yeshiva / head of school at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB) / Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy. The appointment is the culmination of an extensive international search that involved parents, faculty, board members and YU administrators.

Rabbi Michael Taubes will serve as head of school and rosh yeshiva at YU High School for Boys

“Our students and faculty are fortunate to be led by Rabbi Taubes who can bring them to levels of greatness in Torah studies, general studies and ethical and moral behavior,” said Miriam Goldberg, chair of Yeshiva University High Schools Board of Trustees.

Taubes, who has served as interim head of school since September, will continue to work closely with Dr. Seth Taylor, principal for general studies, to ensure that YUHSB is constantly growing to its next horizon and maximizing its relationship with its parent institution, Yeshiva University. With the vibrant beit midrash of a premier Torah institution, the state-of-the-art facilities of a national research university, and world-class roshei yeshiva and professors just steps away, YUHSB’s students and faculty will continue to benefit from their connection to YU.

“Rabbi Taubes brings to our school years of experience as an educator and a role model,” said YU Vice President and Chief of Staff Rabbi Josh Joseph, who directly oversees the high school. “Through his interim leadership role, we’ve noticed a shift in the school’s mood and atmosphere, one that is all for the better and we expect that he will continue to work with our first-class faculty and dedicated parent body to ensure that our students turn into mentschlich bnei torah and future scholars that can only be trained at a place like MTA.”

An alumnus of Yeshivat Har Etzion in Israel, Taubes attended Yeshiva College, where he was honored upon graduation in 1980 with an award for excellence in Talmud. He earned his semicha from Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, where he studied in the shiur of Rav Joseph B. Soloveitchik, zt’l, and holds a master’s degree in Jewish Education from YU’s Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology. Taubes, his wife, Bassie and their children, reside in Teaneck, NJ, where he serves as the spiritual leader of Congregation Zichron Mordechai.

To learn more about Yeshiva University High School for Boys visit www.yuhsb.org.

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YUHSB Senior Fellowship Offers Students College-Level Research Experience

The Senior Fellowship at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB)/ Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy— recently began its fourth year of pairing motivated and inquisitive seniors with Yeshiva University faculty to conduct thorough research in a variety of fields.

Taking advantage of its physical and institutional proximity to the University, YUHSB offers students a unique opportunity to gain exposure to world-class professors and advanced ideas through its Senior Fellowship program.

“We wanted to make it a win-win for both the high school and YU,” said Dr. Ed Berliner, executive director of science management and clinical professor of physics at YU and director of the YUHSB Honors College. “For YU, it is an opportunity to expose our most impressive students to the high-caliber YU education, and in terms of the students, it is a truly unique opportunity to be paired with the best and brightest professors in their fields.”

Berliner noted that many of the graduates of the program continue their studies at Yeshiva College.

Studying topics as diverse as global economics, literary theory, U.S. relations with China, literary modernism, peptide bonds and early biblical interpretation, students have been paired with YU faculty including Dr. James Kahn, Dr. Evan Resnick, Dr. Elizabeth Stewart, Dr. Raji Viswanathan and Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder, among others.

“I have been very impressed with the sophistication and drive for intellectual advancement of the students I have mentored,” said Wieder, the Gwendolyn and Joseph Straus Professor of Talmud at YU-affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. Wieder is currently working with his students on producing prototypes of commentaries on the Hebrew Bible—work that requires his students study in depth the intricacies of biblical Hebrew and literary Aramaic.

Yosef Kornbluth worked with Wieder in 2008 and 2009 on biblical targumim (Aramaic translations of the Bible) and is currently a sophomore in Yeshiva College. Kornbluth especially appreciated how, by the end of his year, he began noticing “the fine nuances in translation and their impact on the meaning of the text.”

Doni Schwartz, a current senior fellow, has thoroughly enjoyed the beginning of his fellowship year spent researching aspects of the Eherenfest Urn Model with Dr. Fredy Zypman, professor of physics at Yeshiva College. “Since my introduction to physics last year I have been enamored with the subject,” said Schwartz. “I am hoping to pursue this field well into my college years. This was a rare opportunity for a high school student and I am honored to have been chosen for it.”

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Local High School Students Face Off at Annual Yeshiva University Debate Tournament

Wandering the corridors of Furst Hall at the Yeshiva University Wilf Campus on Sunday, December 18, would have revealed an unusual sight. Nearly every classroom on the second and third floors contained six individuals in business dress—some with rolled-up sleeves, others swiftly taking notes—all methodically but passionately arguing over the intricate nuances of the ethics of scientific research.

Yoni Zolty and Elan Stochel represent YUHSB at The Great Debate.

Taking part in the 23rd annual Great Debate, these aspiring orators belonged to 11 Jewish high schools in the greater New York metropolitan area. Started by Harriet Levitt, English teacher at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB)—The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy, in 1988, the Great Debate offers Jewish high school students an opportunity to participate in a large formal deliberation among their peers from other schools, a relatively difficult task as most debate meets occur on Saturdays.

This year’s participating schools included the Ezra Academy, Hebrew Academy of Nassau County (HANC), Maayonot, Rae Kushner Yeshiva High School, Ramaz High School, Rambam, SAR High School, SKA High School, Torah Academy of Bergen County (TABC), YUHSB and Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls, with the Jewish Educational Center and DRS High School observing.

YUHSG's Shani Pollack and Mindy Schwarts debate Eli Shulman and Meir Freidenberg of YUHSB.

The Great Debate joins the ranks of the Red Sarachek Basketball Tournament, the Wittenberg Wrestling Tournament and the Yeshiva University National Model United Nations as one of the many annual events that exposes Jewish high schools to the Yeshiva University community.

Teams either had to argue for or against the resolve that stated, “The scientific community should make use of results obtained from unethically performed research.” The results? TABC took first place and YUHSB placed second.

“Debate has the power to change students from self-absorbed individuals into deep-thinking intellectuals,” said Levitt. “Once they get into debate, they turn into different creatures. They realize that there are two points of view on everything. I notice that students on the debate team in my classes are much more likely to speak up with confidence.”

YUHSB's Freidenberg and Shulman

The student participants expressed a variety of reasons for attending. Ari Himber, a senior at HANC, aspires to attend law school in the future and wanted to hone his skills. Zachary Fineberg, a senior at TABC, had a different reason. “I guess I am just a polemical guy,” he said. “I love debating people.” Others simply enjoyed the intellectual exercise, like SAR senior Aviva Leshaw, who said, “I feel alive when I am debating and picking apart an argument.”

Many enjoyed the social aspects of meeting new people within the greater community and studying new topics. “This is a great opportunity to meet new people and learn more about different controversies in our world,” said Shifra Arnheim, a Maayonot senior.

Many of these students had participated in other YU-sponsored events in the past: from previous great debates to attending the Yeshiva University Dramatics Society Production of 1776 or the annual Seforim Sale.

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YU High Schools Hebrew Language Workshop Pairs Students with Acclaimed Israeli Author

Twelve students from the Yeshiva University high schools—eight from the Yeshiva University High School for Boys/Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (YUHSB) and four from the Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls (YUHSG)—are participating in an independent study Hebrew literature course in which they will be mentored by a renowned Israeli author with the goal of developing their Hebrew-language creative writing skills.

Bat Shahar (on-screen) mentors YU High School students during a monthly workshop.

Titled “Meet the Israeli Author,” the course—first implemented last year as a workshop— is the first of its kind in a North American Jewish high school, according to Tova Rosenberg, coordinator of the workshop and director of Hebrew language studies at both YU high schools.

Jerusalem-born Chana Bat Shahar, the author of nine Hebrew titles and recipient of the Prime Minister’s Prize (1994), serves as the students’ mentor—a role she filled last year, as well.

Throughout the year, students will participate in monthly “virtual workshops” with Bat Shahar—conducted entirely in Hebrew— during which they will get to know the author, learn about her methods and receive pointers on how to hone their craft. Between meetings, the students work with their Hebrew teachers to prepare for their monthly sessions.

Yolly Dratch (right) chose to take the course for the second year in a row.

Rosenberg believes that this course provides a multi-faceted experience in which the acquired skills will be widely applicable to other areas of study. “In addition to affording these students the opportunity to meet and interact with a well-known Israeli writer, this unique workshop will help them develop the skills and self-confidence required to write excellent Hebrew stories of their own, and these techniques will be used in their English writing, as well.”

Between video conferencing sessions, the students will correspond and receive additional guidance from Bat Shahar through e-mail.

“I chose to take this class because I wanted to learn more Hebrew and I heard it was unlike any other language class given,” said Yonatan Schwartz, of Teaneck, NJ.

“I think it is incredible that we are able to meet and converse with an established author. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity,” said Avi Rabinovitch of Denver, CO.

Liora Haibi (standing) teaches Hebrew at YUHSB between workshops with Bat Shahar.

Yolly Dratch of West Hempstead, NY chose to take the course for the second year in row. “I took this course again because I enjoyed it a lot last year. The feedback I got from my teachers and Chana bat Shachar was extremely helpful and encouraging,” said Dratch. “The most interesting part about this class is how I’m pushed to do my best and beyond.”

Over the course of the year, the students will publish their own Hebrew literature journal with their completed short stories.

“I have to admit that last year, I had doubts about the success of this workshop,” said Bat Shahar. “I thought that the students would not be able to overcome the difficulty of creative writing in a foreign language. But, the students’ Hebrew improved from session to session and their creative writing, as well. They wrote beautiful and interesting stories.”

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Students Document Holocaust Testimonies as Part of Yeshiva University High Schools’ Oral History Film Project

Growing up as Jews firmly entrenched in the Jewish education system, learning and hearing about the Holocaust was commonplace. Since we were children, we have been exposed to the atrocities of one of the darkest episodes of human history.

Students interview Rabbi Gershon Yankelewitz as part of the Names, Not Numbers program.

Students interview Rabbi Gershon Yankelewitz as part of the Names, Not Numbers program.

But viewing a documentary or reading a book is one thing. Bearing witness is another.

Through the extraordinary work of Mrs. Tova Fish-Rosenberg and Dr. Geoffrey Cahn, select seniors at the Yeshiva University High School for Boys, as well as five other yeshiva day schools, have been given the opportunity to make sure that the memories and experiences of those who went through the Holocaust—both those who perished and those who survived to tell their stories—are preserved.

The Names, Not Numbers program was designed in order to transform traditional history lessons into a lively, interactive, nontraditional curriculum that involves individuals who have actually lived through the history being taught.

Students are split into groups and spend months learning about the history of the Holocaust, filming and interviewing techniques, and researching a survivor that has been assigned to them. All of this preparation leads up to the climax of the project, which is a filmed interview with their group’s Holocaust survivor. The students then spend the next two months editing and consolidating the video of the interview into a 15-minute segment. These segments stand as their own film but are also incorporated into a larger documentary titled Names, Not Numbers.

The Names, Not Numbers program has helped to both preserve the memories of those who suffered during the Holocaust as well as instill modern-day students with a sense of duty to combat anti-Semitism and other forms of hatred and intolerance. Speaking with survivors is perhaps the most effective way to demonstrate the importance  of the charge to never forgot the victims of the Holocaust and to bear witness for those who are no longer with us.

The author, Michael Guggenheim of Passaic, NJ, is a senior at Yeshiva University High School for Boys. As part of the Names, Not Numbers Program, Guggenheim’s group interviewed Rabbi Gershon Yankelewitz, rosh yeshiva at YU’s Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS). A portion of their interview can be seen below.



About Rabbi Gershon Yankelewitz: Born in Lubcza, Poland in 1909, Rabbi Yankelewitz studied in the Radun Yeshiva until the death of its founder, the Chofetz Chaim. Rabbi Yankelewitz then continued his studies at the legendary Mir Yeshiva in Russia, before being forced to flee from the Nazis at the start of World War II. The entire yeshiva relocated to Kobe, Japan before eventually settling in Shanghai, China—where they remained until 1947. Rabbi Yankelewitz has given a daily shiur at RIETS for nearly 60 years.

Rabbi Yankelewitz's copy of the Rambam's Mishna Torah, printed in Shanghai during World War Two.

Presentations of the Names, Not Numbers films are shown each year at their respective high schools at a culminating event honoring the interviewees and showcasing the students’ work. This year’s screenings will be at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (MTA) on May 11 and Yeshiva University High School for Girls (Central) on May 18. The films have also been shown in synagogues, camps and community centers on Kristallnacht, Yom Hashoah and Tishah B’av.

Read more about Names, Not Numbers here.

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Alan Dershowitz to be Honored at Yeshiva University High Schools Dinner on May 3

Yeshiva University High Schools (YUHS) will hold their Annual Dinner of Tribute on Tuesday, May 3, 2011, at New York City’s Sheraton Hotel and Towers. Professor Alan M. Dershowitz will be the guest of honor. Rabbi Mark Gottlieb will be honored as Kesser Shem Tov and special tribute will be paid to Mr. and Mrs. Ya’acov and Harriet Sklar. Mr. and Mrs. Gary and Meryl Hoffman will be recognized as parents of the year.

Alan Dershowitz

Alan Dershowitz

Dershowitz, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, is a graduate of Yeshiva University High Schools and has published hundreds of articles in numerous publications such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, The New Republic and Commentary. He is the author of 27 fiction and non-fiction works with a worldwide audience. Dershowitz’s most recent titles include Rights From Wrong, The Case For Israel, The Case For Peace and The Case For Moral Clarity: Israel, Hamas and Gaza.

Rabbi Gottlieb has served as head of school and menahel at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB) since 2005. He also serves as the dean of the Tikvah High School Scholars program, an interdisciplinary leadership institute promoting Jewish Thought and the enduring human questions. Previously, Rabbi Gottlieb was principal of the Middle & Upper School at the Maimonides School in Brookline, MA, and has taught at The Frisch School, Ida Crown Jewish Academy, Loyola University in Chicago, Hebrew Theological College (Skokie, IL) and the University of Chicago. After graduating YUHSB, Rabbi Gottlieb received his B.A. at Yeshiva College, his rabbinical ordination at the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) of Yeshiva University and his M.A. in philosophy at the University of Chicago. He is currently completing his dissertation in philosophy at the University of Chicago on the problem of translation and the tasks of education in a cosmopolitan culture.

Rabbi Mark Gottlieb

Rabbi Mark Gottlieb

Ya’acov Sklar has served as principal of YUHSB for the past 12 years. A graduate of YUHSB and Yeshiva College, he earned an M.S. in science and an M.A. in school administration and supervision from City University. Harriet Sklar, associate principal at Yeshiva University High School for Girls (YUHSG), received a B.A. from the College of New Rochelle and her M.A. in education from Lehman College. She has been part of the high school for the past 13 years after an impressive 15 year career in the New York City public school system.

Gary Hoffman, a graduate of the YU High Schools and Yeshiva College, is the president of YUHSB’s Parents’ Council.

For reservations, to place an ad in the journal or for more information about the dinner, please contact 212-960-5366 or email yuhsdinner@yu.edu by April 18.

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Yeshiva University High School for Boys Hockey Team Wins Ninth Yeshiva League Championship

Teammates and fans appeared equally joyous at the MTA Lions varsity hockey squad's 2-0 win over DRS to bring a ninth varsity hockey championship home to Washington Heights. (Photos by Shlomo Friedman)

The Yeshiva University High School for Boys/MTA Lions varsity hockey squad has won its league championship for the ninth time in school history and 15 years to the day since the last time. MTA shut-out the Five Towns’ Davis-Renov-Stahler Yeshiva High School (DRS) 2-0 on Sunday to take the championship game of the Metropolitan Yeshiva High School Hockey League (MYHSHL).

Goalie Yoni Jaroslawicz, a junior from Manhattan, was named most valuable player in the game which was played at Lawrence Middle School in Lawrence, NY. Senior Eliezer Lisker of Kew Garden Hills, NY and Sophomore Eitan Rosenfeld of Teaneck, NJ, scored the only two goals.

The last time the Yeshiva University High School for Boys team made Yeshiva League hockey history, prior to Sunday, was March 27, 1996 — 15 years earlier, to the day — when the Lions defeated the Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway (HAFTR). In 2005 MTA made it to the finals only to lose to Frisch.

MTA enjoyed a 10-4 record in the 2010-11 season, led by Captain Noah Isaacs, a senior from Teaneck, NJ, and co-Captains Eitan Stern and Gabe Rosenfeld, both juniors from Teaneck. The team beat Frisch 4-1 in the first round of the playoffs, shut-out HAFTR 1-0 in overtime in the quarterfinals and was victorious over SAR 5-4 in the semi-finals, before finally defeating DRS in the championship game.

Victorious! The MTA Lions varsity hockey squad after its 2-0 win over DRS to bring home the ninth league championship in team history.

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Yeshiva University High School for Boys’ Yisrael Feld Leads Team USA to Gold at Maccabi Australia International Games

YUHSB's Yisrael Feld

YUHSB's Yisrael Feld at the Maccabi Games (Courtesy of Yvette Sher)

Led by Yisrael Feld, a senior at Yeshiva University High School for Boys (MTA), the USA basketball team took the gold at the Maccabi Australia International Games on January 2 in Sydney, Australia. The team included two other local Yeshiva League ballplayers, HAFTR’s Shelby Rosenberg and JEC’s Yehuda Heller.

Feld, a six foot guard and captain of the MTA Lions, felt honored to represent his country. “Having USA written across my jersey was an unreal experience,” said the Teaneck, NJ native. “And traveling to Sydney and meeting all sorts of Jews from across the world was really amazing.”

When he began assembling his roster months ago, Team USA Coach Elliot Steinmetz ’02SB, approached Maccabi USA with the idea of recruiting more Orthodox players—a nontraditional practice at previous games.

Team USA

(Yvette Sher)

“I wanted to get more religious kids involved and Maccabi was very supportive and accommodating,” said Steinmetz, who played basketball for YU. In all, seven of the team’s ten members were Orthodox—a Maccabi USA first, according to Steinmetz. “Regardless of their backgrounds, the guys got along great and were able to come together to compete in a short amount of time.”

Though the team had only two practices together before the tournament began, they were able to sweep through the 18 and under tournament. With Feld leading the way—averaging 29 points per game—Team USA went an undefeated 5-0.

Feld is no rookie when it comes to success on the court. During the 2008-09 season, he was the first sophomore to play on MTA’s varsity team in more than a decade and was named National Sophomore of the Year by Jewish Hoops America. The following year saw Feld making the All Jewish Hoops America National First Team, and most recently, in October, scoring his 1,000th point in only his 50th game.

Feld, left, celebrates with his teammates at medal ceremony

Feld, left, celebrates with teammates at medal ceremony (Yvette Sher).

“He’s really a fantastic kid with fantastic talent that can make any coach look good,” said Steinmetz, who first met Feld a few years ago at a basketball camp he operates. “But what’s more impressive is that he’s a true mentch on and off the court.”

Daniel Gibber, head coach of the MTA Lions, shared the sentiment.

“Yisrael has so much pressure on him as people expect him to carry the team every game. It’s remarkable how successful he’s been,” said Gibber ’91YUHS, ’96SB. “More importantly he is extremely levelheaded, humble and quiet about his skills. He is one of the nicest kids you can be around.”

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Area High School Students Convene on Wilf Campus for Debate Tournament Sponsored by Sy Syms School of Business

“This debate is very simple,” began Shua Brick, a senior at Yeshiva University High School for Boys/Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy (YUHSB). “We complicate it with percentages and numbers, but ultimately, this is a simple argument.”

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Facing his two opponents, teenagers like himself, and a pensive judge, Brick spread his hands wide. “My grandfather lives at home with us because of a stroke,” he said. “First I thought this debate was about him. Then I realized it would affect me. Not my grandchildren or my children—me. What would we do without Social Security?”

More than 116 debaters from 16 local yeshiva high schools were asking the same question. On Sunday, YUHSB hosted the 22nd Annual M.T.A. Cross-Examination Debate Tournament at Yeshiva University’s Wilf Campus. Sponsored by the Sy Syms School of Business and known also as the “Great Debate,” the competition drew experienced debaters from a spectrum of schools. The big issue up for discussion: Congress’s proposed legislation to privatize Social Security by allowing Americans to invest a portion of the tax in private retirement accounts.

During three rounds that each featured 25 simultaneous matches, students demonstrated their expertise, passion and self-possession, name-dropping congressional authorities and discussing the nuances of retirement ages in Sweden, Chile and France. Judges, who ran the gamut from veteran debate coaches to college students who participated in the tournament in high school, delivered oral critiques at the end of each round to point out strengths and flaws in each debater’s style.

“It’s not like speaking in a telephone booth,” said Harriet Levitt, who organized the first debate in 1988 to give yeshiva students a forum to hone their skills, since national competitions are typically held on Saturdays. Chair of the English department and debate coach at YUSHB, Levitt has mentored hundreds of students on technique and style. “You have to be sensitive to how you’re being perceived and present your case in an organized fashion,” she explained. “The skills students develop, of researching thoroughly and relating to others, are very important in today’s world of instant communication.”

They’re also skills whose value only increases as students move on to college, graduate study and professional careers. “So much of college is constructing arguments about assigned topics, the precise crafting of ideas,” said Simeon Botwinick, ’11 YC, who was a president of the YUHSB debate team and now serves as editor-in-chief of The Commentator. Rabbi Eli Cohn, a teacher at YUHSB who debated in high school and was one of the judges in Sunday’s competition, agreed. “The ability to articulate an argument, evaluate a thesis and respond to a claim are all skills that I use daily,” he said.

“Communication skills are absolutely critical to people in all areas of business,” said Michael Ginzburg, dean of Sy Syms. The business school began sponsoring the debate tournaments last year to emphasize this need to potential students. “Many people think we’re only concerned with quantitative skills, but having the best analytic or number skills without having an ability to effectively communicate the results of your analysis will not lead to success in business.”

For debate participants, the competition was a rare opportunity to gauge their abilities against other students from differing milieus and education models. “Being with all these people from different backgrounds is good practice,” said Jason Lefkovitz, a junior at North Shore Hebrew Academy. “It takes you out of your comfort zone.”

Participating schools included YUHSB, Samuel H. Wang/ Yeshiva University High School for Girls (YUHSG), the Jewish Educational Center of Elizabeth, NJ, the Yeshiva of Flatbush, Ramaz, HANC, and Maayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls among others. Michael Guggenheim and Daniel Goffstein, a YUHSB team, came in first place, with Daelin Hillman and Emma Goldberg of the Abraham Joshua Heschel High School in second.

The “Great Debate” is also responsible for many new friendships. “I think it’s good to be put together with other students who have common interests in academic settings,” said Leah Sladen, a sophomore from SAR Academy, one of the participating schools. Botwinick agreed. “In college, most interactions with other schools are through sporting events, but this is talking intelligently and conversing. I have friends in college today that I met through debate.” He added: “We definitely had something to talk about!”

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On November 15, Dr. Michael Berenbaum addressed students at both Yeshiva University High Schools (YUHS) in connection with Names, Not Numbers, an oral history project and curriculum in which students research, interview and film Holocaust survivors. Berenbaum is the author and editor of 18 books and co-produced One Survivor Remembers: The  Gerda  Weissmann  Klein Story, a film which was recognized with an Academy award, an Emmy Award and the Cable Ace Award. He was the chief historical consultant for Last Days, which also won an Academy Award in 1998.  Berenbaum is perhaps best known for his work as research deputy director of the President’s Commission on the Holocaust, project director of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and director of the USHMM’s Holocaust Research Institute.

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/16892459[/vimeo]

Created in 2003 by Tova Rosenberg, director of Hebrew language studies at YUHS, Names, Not Numbers teaches students the skills they need to interview and film an oral history of Holocaust survivors, resulting in a documentary film, Names, Not Numbers, and a second, “making of” film, Names, Not Numbers: A Movie in the Making. Previous years have featured training sessions from journalists such as Joseph Berger from The New York Times, Gary Rosenblatt from The Jewish Week and CBS news producer, Stephanie Cassell.

To date, over 360 students and 160 survivors and World War II veterans throughout North America have participated in the program, for which Rosenberg was awarded the Baumel Award for Excellence in Jewish Studies in 2004.

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