Dr. Josefa Steinhauer, associate professor of biology, was one of a panel of researchers and educators quoted in an article in the January issue of Trends in Genetics.

One question posed to the group was, “Why is genetics education so important?” Steinhauer’s reply, in part, pointed to the ubiquity of genetics topics in current everyday life, including at the doctor’s office and at the supermarket. “Navigating the modern world requires understanding how technological developments in medicine and agriculture, many based on genetics, impinge on our daily lives,” she explained. She went on to discuss the necessity for the understanding of scientific progress and for the public to be able to navigate the wide assortment of information available on the Internet.

Another question was more personal, asking how long the panel members have been teaching genetics and how the material has changed since they were students. Steinhauer answered at length, describing her own graduate experience and noting how some of the classic material she was presented with then is still relevant to today’s students.

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