YU Receives $11 Million from Jim Joseph Foundation to Advance Jewish Life through Jewish Education

On the heels of a $4 million grant to Yeshiva University last September, the San Francisco-based Jim Joseph Foundation announced today that it is making a new $11 million grant to bring its overall investment in YU’s training and credentialing of Jewish educators to a historic $15 million over the next four years. With new grants in the same amount to The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) and Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC), the Foundation has now committed a total of $45 million to increase the number of credentialed future Jewish educators and improve the quality of professional preparation and Jewish education they receive.

YU Receives $11 Million from Jim Joseph Foundation to Advance Jewish Life through Jewish Education

On the heels of a $4 million grant to Yeshiva University last September, the San Francisco-based Jim Joseph Foundation announced today that it is making a new $11 million grant to bring its overall investment in YU’s training and credentialing of Jewish educators to a historic $15 million over the next four years. With new grants in the same amount to The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) and Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC), the Foundation has now committed a total of $45 million to increase the number of credentialed future Jewish educators and improve the quality of professional preparation and Jewish education they receive.

Y.U. “Summer Camp” Returns To Southern Israel With Jewish Life Values and Summer Fun

The Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future (www.yu.edu/cjf) announced today that 21 outstanding students from select U.S. universities will be arriving in Israel next week to serve as counselors on the fourth annual “Counterpoint Israel Program.” The month-long service-learning initiative, scheduled to run from July 23-August 23, aims to empower and build the next generation of Israeli youth by providing them a summer camp experience filled with important life skills.

“And I Still See Their Faces” Captures the Breadth of Jewish Life in Poland Before Holocaust

In a dog-eared black-and-white photo, three glamorous young Jewish women stride confidently down Gleboka Street in the Polish town of Cieszyn, sometime during the 1930s. They are wearing the fashions of the day: two-piece suits, fur stoles, and dainty gloves. We know only the name of the woman on the right, Hilda Glanz, who demurely clutches her purse while her friends smile at the photographer.