Dr. Kathryn Krase, associate professor of social work at the Wurzweiler School of Social Work, co-authored “Micro, mezzo, and macro factors associated with coping in the early phase of COVID-19” for the Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment (Dec. 10, 2020). Her co-authors are Dr. Donna Wang (Department of Social Work, Springfield College), Dr. Thalia MacMillan (School of Human Services, Department of Health, Human Services, and Addiction Studies, SUNY Empire State College) and Alexandra Chana Fishman , Yonason Ron Witonsky and Chantee Parris-Stingle, three Wurzweiler Ph.D. students.

The article reports on the results of a cross-sectional, online survey administered to adults living in the United States and Canada in June 2020 about how well they were coping with COVID-19. The authors found that “the factors that contributed to higher reported coping were increased age, following preventative measures, support from family and friends, and support from children’s schools. Feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information, level of life disruption, use of substances as support, challenges with medical care, and satisfaction with national government significantly predicted a lesser ability to cope.”

In terms of social work practice, “this study revealed more factors that contributed with lesser ability to cope than it did factors that contributed to increased coping. … Identifying sources of stress and decreased coping helps us as social workers to plan interventions and advocacy in areas of need.”

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